"You'll never know what it means to be hunted. You can never sleep. You've always got to listen with one ear and keep one eye open.  After a while, you almost go crazy. No sleep! No sleep! Even when you know you're perfectly safe, you can't sleep. Every pissant under your pillow sounds like a posse of sheriffs coming to get you!"

--Matt Warner. 

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The following timeline features the activities of Butch Cassidy, the Sundance Kid, Etta Place, the Hole in the Wall/Wild Bunch gang, and some assorted associates, from 1890 on to 1910. In creating it, I have tried to rely as much as possible on the newest, best-researched books on Butch, Sundance, Harvey Logan, and Etta Place, including:

The Bassett Women by Grace McClure.

Butch Cassidy, A Biography by Richard Patterson. (This is the best overall biography on Butch Cassidy.)

Butch Cassidy, My Uncle by Bill Betenson. (Betenson, descended from Butch's sister, writes from the perspective that Butch did not die in South America but returned to the US, and provides a lengthy list of people who claimed to have seen him in the 1920s-30s. His book is to be commended for giving great details on Butch's early life, and a plethora of outstanding period photos.)

Deadliest Outlaws by Jeffrey Burton..

Digging up Butch and Sundance by Anne Meadows. (A must-have book telling the story of Etta, Butch and Suadance in South America, and how Dan Buck and Anne Meadows undertook their journey in tracing down what really happened to them.)

Etta Place--by Gail Drago.

Harvey Logan in Knoxville--by Sylvia D. Lynch.

He rode with Butch and Sundance--by Mark T. Smokov. ((This is the last word on Harvey Logan, the roughest and toughest of the Wild Bunch, forgotten by history.)

The Last Outlaws--by Thom Hatch.

The Sundance Kid--by Donna Ernst.

Tiger of the Wild Bunch--by Gary Wilson.

Wild Bunch Women--by Michael Rutter.

Beyond these works, I've added what I've found in studying the Internet and newsgroup postings, other books, magazine articles, and TV specials on the subject. These latter sources are often not to the caliber of accuracy compared to the newest extant books on the subject, but to be as comprehensive as possible, I have included information passed on by these sources to help fill in the Mosaic of the Wild Bunch's activities as much as possible.

If anyone has some dates and events I have yet to include, please let me know.

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Other classic books used in this timeline include:

Desperate Men--by James D. Horan.

In Search of Butch Cassidy--by Larry Pointer.

Last of the Great Western Train Robbers--by Brown Waller. (Waller's obscure book, though dated, is to be praised as a first-rate effort for its time to comprehensively cover the career of Harvey Logan, even presenting some obscure information gleaned through hand-searching of original newspaper accounts otherwise forgotten until I redisovered the same through the convenience of modern computer research.)

The Outlaws--by James D. Horan.

The Outlaw Trail--the Story of Butch Cassidy by Charles Kelly.

Riding the Outlaw Trail by Simon Casson.

The Wild Bunch--by Frank Lamb (edited by Alan Swallow).

The Wild Bunch at Robbers Roost--by Pearl Baker.

Also thanks to Kerry Ross Boren, Dan Buck, Pat Schroeder, Jack Stroud and Colin Taylor, human encyclopediasswhen it comes to the Wild Bunch.

1890

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Date/event

May have happened

Notes

Spring. Sundance works for the Bar U ranch in Calgary, Canada. Harvey Logan works for the Circle C ranch.    
Aug. 28. Joe Bush arrests Dan Parker for his December, 1889, robbery of a stage coach.    
Fall. Butch establishes a ranch near Dubois, Wy. with Al Hainer.    
Oct. 19. Dan Parker enters the Wyoming State Penitentiary.    
Winter. Sundance goes to work for the Murphy Cattle Co. in NE Montana.

Harvey Logan works for the Circle C ranch near Zortman, Mt.

Butch Cassidy works for the Pitchfork and 4H ranches, and may have met Harvey Logan at this time.

   
Dec. 25. Hearing word that the law was closing in on him, Butch sells his ranch on Blue Creek, near Hole in the Wall, to Jim Stubbs, and may have sought work at the Pitchfork Ranch near Thermopolis.    

 

   

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1891

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

January-December Butch Cassidy and Al Hainer drift between the Pitchfork, Quien Sabe and their own ranch.    
April 7. Dan Parker goes to trial.    
April 18. Dan Parker and Jim Moore were found guilty of robbing the US mail.   Both were sentenced to life.
August. Butch buys three stolen horses from Billy Nutcher on Owl creek.    
Aug. 7. Sundance is arrested in Canada for cruelty to animals, although the charges were immediately dismissed.      
Fall. Butch sneaks down the stairs and escapes two lawmen at the Moore Hotel in Fort Washakie.    
Nov. 15. "Jew Jake" Harris gets into a shootout with Marshal Treat in Great Falls, Mt., requiring his leg be amputated.    
Nov. 18. Sundance stands in as Best Man for ranch foreman Ebb Johnson.    

Winter. Butch finds work at the Ayers, Beason and Two Bar ranches.

    

1892

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

  Early Winter, 1892. After doing some wrangling,. Butch may have drifted over to Rock Springs and gone to work for a butcher named Gottsche.  
1892. On the run from Texas where he is wanted for assault, "Deaf Charley" Hanks works for the "79" ranch at Miles City, Mt.    
Early 1892. Sundance briefly partners with Frank Hamilton in Calgary, running the Grand Central Hotel Saloon.   They soon quarrel, and Sundance returns to the US after forcing Hamilton, at gunpoint, to pay an extra hundred dollars for a horse. 
Feb. 9. Will Carver marries 17-year-old Viana Byler in Texas.      
April 11. Butch Cassidy and Al Hainer are arrested for the three stolen horses Butch purchased from Billy Nutcher.   Butch, unwilling to go peaceably, was shot in the head but was only wounded.
  June. According to Jeffrey Burton, Sundance may have robbed five stage coaches with three friends.  
Mid-July. Johnnie Logan gets into a shootout with a sheepherder named Olson, requiring his right arm be amputated.

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Charley Crouse sells his famous 3-legged cow for $200. (The Salt Lake Tribune, July 24, 1892.)

   What became of Olson is unknown.
July 22. Viana Carver dies in childbirth.    
July 30. Butch Cassidy and Al Hainer bailed out of jail.   Butch then headed to a cabin on Owl creek and got some part-time work as a stagecoach guard, supplementing his income with a bit of rustling on the side.
Sep. 20. After being charged with burglary with William Davis and two others, Jim Thornhill and Davis plead guilty to petty larceny and are sentenced to 60 days in the county jail, with a warning by the judge not to get into trouble again (The Anaconda Standard, Sep. 21, 1892).    
  October? According to Kerry Ross Boren, subsequent to being bailed out, Butch eventually drifted down to Texas where he met a teenage Etta Place, working in a cathouse. Feeling sorry for her, he brought her back to Utah and placed her with a family. This story is allegedly the basis on which the two eventually wound up at Robbers Roost together with Elza and Maude Lay. All the chief modern Wild Bunch historians discount this claim (as they typically do the Robbers Roost story itself), but it is the only legend offering an explanation for Etta's appearance at Robbers' Roost.

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For what it's worth, Butch's sister also affirmed the Robbers' Roost tale but claimed Etta was there with Sundance, not Butch.

Nov. 2. Tom O'Day loses a horse race at the Buffalo, Wy. fairgrounds to Ed Tway. (Buffalo Bulletin, Nov. 3, 1892.)    
Nov. 29. Sundance, Bill Madden and Harry Bass rob the Great Northern Railway near Malta, Montana.   Netted $64, mostly in checks. The bandits made a toast to the crew before leaving. Madden and Bass were caught and served 10 years.

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The Pinkertons believed "Deaf Charley" Hanks was one of the participants in the robbery.

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HELD UP NEAR MALTA.

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Three Masked Men Stop the Great Northern Express Train in Dawson County.

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Several Packages, Worth Probably $1,000, Taken From the Local Safe.

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A Tough Safe, Full of Money, couldn't be Opened, the Messenger Not Having the Combination.

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The Great Northern express train which arrived here at 3:25 a. m. from the east yesterday was held up by three masked men before daylight one mile west of Malta, a station on the main line between Chinook and Glasgow. The express car was entered, the messenger made to open the local safe at the point of a gun, and a number of packages taken, the value of which will not exceed $1,000. The through safe, the combination of which is known only to the agents of the Great Northern Express company at division points, was not disturbed. It came near costing the messenger his life, however, as the leader of the robbers was evidently in doubt for awhile as to whether he was telling the truth when he told them that he didn't know the combination and couldn't open the big safe if he had to be killed for not doing so. The failure to get into the big safe lost the robbers what might have made them wealthy men.

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It is evident that the three robbers boarded the train at Malta in the darkness, and took positions on the front or "blind" end of the express car and behind the tender of the engine. There they remained concealed until the train had gotten about a mile out of Malta. One of the men then climbed on to the tender, and covering the engineer with a revolver, directed him to stop the train at once. The engineer did so with great suddenness. This robber remained on the engine to watch the engineer and fireman, while his two companions got down from their hiding place and walked toward the rear of the train. They met Conductor Bywater, who was coming forward with his lantern to see what was the cause of the sudden stop. He learned it very quickly when two revolvers were brought on a line with his head and he was directed to hold up his hands. Up they went, lantern and all. The brakeman also wanted to know what was going on, and went forward to find out. He found out just as the conductor had, and in a minute after his curiosity was satisfied he was also standing with his hands in the air. The two robbers, with revolvers pointed at the conductor and the brakeman, ordered them to march to the door of the express car and request the messenger to open up. Jacob Hauert, who lives in Helena, was the express messenger. When Hauert got the request he wanted to know what was the matter, too. Conductor Bywater told him. Hauert recognized the logic of the situation and pushed open the door of the express car and looked down. Though it was very dark, still by the light of the conductor's lantern he saw he was looking down the muzzle of a 45 caliber revolver. One of the robbers, who appeared to be the leader, commanded Hauert to jump to he ground. The messenger did so, and the leader questioned him closely as to whether there were any other occupants of the car. When assured that there was no one else in the car, Hauert was ordered to climb back,. which he did, and the leader followed him. At first, Hauert was ordered to stand six feet from the safes. Next he was told to open the big safe used for through runs. 'The messenger said he was unable to do so as he was not in possession of the combination. The next order was to open the local safe, the one used for packages picked up or to be distributed along the route between division points. With the revolver still pointed at him Hauert complied with the demand. the leader of the gang, telling Hauert not to move, began rummaging through the safe, repeatedly asking questions as to the contents of various packages. Among the contents of the safe were three small packages of jewelry. As the robber picked up each one separately, he asked Hauert about its contents. Hauert replied in each case that they were ordinary packages, of little value, but that on account of the small size they had been thrown into the safe for fear they might get lost if left knocking about the car. After a critical examination from the outside the robber took one of the packages and put it in his pocket. The other two he cast aside as worthless. He singled out half a dozen other packages end took besides all the loose cash in the safe, amounting to less that $10.

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When through rifling the local safe the robber again demanded that Hauert open the large one. For a second time Hauert told the robber that he did not have the combination, and explained the circumstances which, in effect, are that the express company does not give the messengers any information about how to open their through safes, which are locked by the agent at the end of a division and can only be unlocked by the agent at the other end; a provision doubtless made in anticipation of visits from just such gentleman as he and his two friends.

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"You open that safe, or you die." said the man with the gun, softly.

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"Very well, then. I suppose I've got to die," replied the intrepid messenger.

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The robber looked at the messenger for a few moments as if deliberating as to the truth of his statement. Meantime, Hauert was thinking hard of the chances he stood of taking a central part in a funeral service. Finally the highwayman seemed to be convinced that the messenger was telling the truth and began backing toward the door of the car, still keeping Hauert covered with his revolver. When he reached the door the man nodded pleasantly to the messenger, and with "good bye," jumped out. The robber who had accompanied him to the car door was still there, taking care of the conductor and brakeman. The third one was still looking after the engineer and the fireman. Hauert was called and with his two companions backed off with leveled revolvers and disappeared in the darkness. As the supposed leader vanished through the door of the express car, Hauert reached for his Winchester. Having gotten it, he cautiously approached the door and peered out, in the hope of getting a shot at the robbers. The darkness, however, was too dense. the train then started on its westward trip.

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None of the passengers were disturbed, the robbers evidently expecting to make their big haul in the express car. In fact, the passengers knew nothing of the robbery until it was all over. One of them, Ed Goodkind, a Helena man had $2,000 in his pocket. He is usually in the habit when traveling with large sums of putting it in the express company's care for safe keeping. On this occasion he was pressed for time and neglected to do it. Had he done so the money must have gone in the local safe and fallen into the hands of the robbers. Two others of the passengers were English tourists The brakeman was sitting talking to them when the train left Malta. In order to carry out the prevailing impression of western life the brakeman was telling the tourists that hardly a day passes without his train being held up. His story was out short by the sudden stopping of the train. The brakeman went forward and, sure enough, walked right into the middle of the hold-up.

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As the packages taken by the robbers were mostly goods, it is believed that $1,000 will more than cover the proceeds of the holdup. Had the men been able to get into the through safe, however, they would have made a rich haul. Its contents, though not definitely known, are supposed to have been away up, maybe $100,000. The man who rifled the safe is described as being about five feet ten inches in height, wearing a fur overcoat and blue overalls. He had a cap pulled down over his eyes and the lower part of his face was covered with a handkerchief. His two companions also had handkerchiefs on for masks.

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Malta, where the robbers are supposed to have boarded the train, is a small station in Dawson county, sixty-five miles west of Glasgow and seventy-eight miles east of Chinook. The train stops there but a few moments, and the three men, who had evidently laid their plans well beforehand, no doubt selected this as the best place for their operations, both because it is far from any central point, and because of the time of night the express passes there.

--Helena Independent, Nov. 30, 1892.

Dec 1. A Glasgow posse finds the men drinking in Alex Black’s saloon, then retreats after being threatened by them. They are arrested later that night.    
Dec. 8. They are released for lack of evidence, and Sundance (who had been arrested under the alias of J. E. Ebaugh) escapes before a warrant is re-issued for him under the name of Lounghbo.   After leaving, Sundance winds up working at the N Bar N ranch near Culbertson, Mt., where he befriends Harvey Logan. Sundance then spends the next three years ranching.
Dec. 25. Ben Kilpatrick marries Nancy Williams.   Nancy would have a daughter Abby on October 14, 1893, and a son Ben Jr., on October 29, 1896. Kilpatrick would ultimately abandon them in the Summer of 1897.
  One legend has Butch trekking through the snow in Winter to deliver medicine to sick folk near Lander.  

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1893

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

  1893. Etta is alleged by Dorris Karen Burton to have attended the State Normal and Training School in New York. Burton also advanced the theory that Ann Bassett and Etta Place were the same person, basing that in large part on a comparison of blowup photos between the two. However, Ann Bassett's movements in the US were also subsequently traced and accounted for when Etta was known to be in South America. Also, other photos of Ann that Burton seems to have been unaware of or ignored (including one with her father) show she had no real resemblance to Etta Place.
January. Elza Lay and Frank Wilson con a Lander jeweler with a new Winchester on consignment into trading it for a used rifle.   Owner Jim Carter complained to sheriff Charlie Stough and had the pair arrested for fraud, but they eventually talked their way out of the jam.
Feb. 20. Wyatt Hanks is released from the Huntsville Penitentiary after a five-year stint for horse thievery. (The San Angelo Press, July 2, 1902.)    
March 16. "Jew Jake" Harris sentenced to a year in jail at Deer Lodge for shooting Marshal Treat and two others at a Helena train station in 1891.   Once out, he would head for Landusky, and open a clothing store and saloon.
June 12. After being arrested, Butch Cassidy and Al Hainer are tried for stealing horses from the Padlock ranch. They are acquitted on June 22.    
Summer. Walt Punteney and two other ranch hands track down some horse thieves for the M Bar ranch, and Punteney is made asst. foreman as a reward.    
Aug. 8 (approx.) Elza Lay rides 50 miles in eight hours to fetch a doctor to deliver Alice Burnbaugh's baby.    
Aug. 17. "Flatnose" Currie is jailed in Sundance on a charge of horse theft. (Sundance Reform Aug. 17, 1893.)    
Aug. 25. "Deaf Charley" Hanks, Jack Shipman, Sam Shermer, and Jack White rob a Northern Pacific train at Reed's point, near Livingston, Mt.   The take was mediocre, and the group wound up hiding out in a cabin on an Indian reservation, where a posse found and engaged them in a gunfight. A man was killed, and the robbers escaped when the Indian police, under command of Little Dog, ran from the scene.
Sep. 7. Tom, Bill and Fred McCarty rob the Merchants bank in Delta, Co.   Cashier Andrew Blachly was shot in the head, and Bill and Fred were subsequently shot and killed by a hardware store owner who happened to be cleaning his rifle outside the building. Tom supposedly escaped with $100, and $1000 they had stolen was recovered on the bodies.

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THE CASHIER SHOT DEAD.

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TWO BANK ROBBERS KILLED AS THEY RAN OFF WITH THE PLUNDER.

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An Exciting Three Minutes In Delta Col--Cashier Blachly Killed as He Raised the Alarm--Well-Aimed shots from Mr. Simpson's Rifle Pick Two of the Outlaws from their Horses--Chase Given to the Third, but He escapes to the Mountains.

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Delta. Col., Sept. 7. The usual attempt to rob bank in a bold manner ended disastrously here this morning, when three young desperadoes tried to make away with the funds of the Farmers and Merchants' Bank. Cashier A . T. Blachly was shot In the neck and instantly killed, and two of the robbers were picked from their horses as they rode down an alley by the clever marksmanship of W. Ray Simpson, a hardware dealer, and the money was recovered from their dead bodies.

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It was about 10 o'clock when three men on horseback appeared in the alley at the rear of the bank. Two dismounted, leaving the other man to hold the horses. The men entered by the front door and appeared at the window.

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At that moment only the cashier and his assistant' H. H. Wolbert, were in the bank. They both went forward to wait on the customers, when they were covered with revolvers and ordered to hold up their hands.

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Cashier Blachly yelled, and was promptly cursed ly the robbers, who told him to keep quiet. He yelled again, when one of the robbers fired his revolver and Blachly fell dead, the ball having passed upward from the neck. The men then vaulted over the partition, grabbed what money was in sight, and fled through the rear door. As they did this Wolbert picked up his revolver, but was observed by the robbers, who got the drop on him. They did not shoot, but ordered him to throw away his revolver, which he did very quickly. They then dashed into the alley, mounted, and fled down the narrow way toward Gunnison River.

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When the first shot, which killed the cashier, was heard, the cry was raised that the bank was being robbed. Men rushed for revolvers and guns and then ran toward the bank. Among them was W. R. Simpson, a young hardware merchant, whose shop was across the street from the bank. He picked up a rifle and started up the street. As the robbers came out of the alley and crossed the street, Simpson fired and one of the robbers fell, the top of his head being fairly taken off by the ball.

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Simpson then ran to the alley and fired after the other two fleeing men. He shot twice, killing first another man and then his horse. The second man was also struck in the head. The remaining survivor escaped across the river and down toward Grand Junction.

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A posse was soon gathered and started in hot pursuit. The robber's horse was fresh, and he gave them a pretty chase. A number of ranchmen came into town this afternoon from down the valley, and reported having seen the man riding by several miles ahead of his pursuers.

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Other parties left later, going across into the Escalante country, hoping to head off the man. He will be promptly lynched it caught.

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At the time the robbery was going on a lawyer named W. R. Robertson, having his office in the rear of the bank, heard the first shout and ran out into the alley into the arms of the robbers holding the horses, who quickly covered him with a revolver and kept him there until joined by the escaping robbers from the bank.

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The men have been seen about this part of the country for several days. No one knows them. While here, two stopped at the hotel, registering as Clarence Bradley and James G. Bradley. About $1,000 was taken by the robbers, and it was all recovered from the dead bodies of the two men left in the alley.

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Since they were placed in the undertaker's shop, they have been identified by several as the same fellows who held up the bank of Telluride four years ago.

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Clarence Bradley told one man here that they came from the Rogue River country, Oregon, and that they had been herding cattle in Utah. A reward of $500 has been offered.

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This evening one party of pursuers returned to town saying that the trail had been lost, the man escaping into the mountains. As he has a good mount he will no doubt make good his escape.

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Mr. Blachly was about 47 years old. In 1878 or thereabouts he conducted a drug store at Canon City. As the railroad was extended he followed it, keeping at various periods a drug store at Arkansas City, Mears, and Sargent. Finally, when the Denver and Rio Grande reached Guunison. he located in that city, opening a drugstore, as in other places. In 1885 he failed in business. Then he went upon a ranch near Delta for a time, leaving it to become cashier of the Farmers' and Merchants' Bank. He has relatives in several places in Connecticut.

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Denver. Sept. 7. Speaking of the Delta Bank robbery this evening, President Moffat of the First National Bank said: "I think the robbers are of the same gang of scoundrels that has been doing so much mischief in the West and probably one of them robbed me."

--The New York Sun Sep. 8, 1893.

Sep. 27. A letter for a "Thomas Capehart" is noted as being unclaimed at Miles City, Mt. (Yellowstone Journal, Sep. 30, 1893).    
Autumn. Ann Basset enrolls in the St. Mary's of the Wasatch Academy in Salt Lake City.    
Oct. 6. "Deaf Charley," Jack Shipman, Sam Shermer, and Jack White were cornered in McCarthyville, Mt.   In the ensuing battle, Chipman was killed, and Shermer was wounded and captured. "Deaf Charley" managed to escape for a day, and then was talked into surrendering by ranch foreman William Bracken. White also managed to escape.
Oct. 9 Sam Shermer dies from a hip wound suffered during capture.

Walt Punteney and some hands from the Embar Cattle Co. depart for an all-expense-paid trip to the World's Fair.

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The officers and employees of the Embar Cattle Co., who came to the road with beef on the last shipment, started Monday morning on an excursion to the World's Fair at the expense of the company. The party consisted of Jacob Price, superintendent; Virgil R. Rice, foreman of cattle; Walter Punteney assistant foreman of cattle; and William L. Baker, Levy C. Bell, Charles E. Blonde, Henry Close, James R. Ingram, Frank E. James, William J Lanigan, J. V. E. Marsh. S. O. Morrison, William E. McCann, Edward K. Pollock, Henry Rivers, John M. Shafer and Thomas P. Welch.

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Judge Jay L. Torrey saw the party off, and in a neat little speech expressed the hope that the boys would have a delightful time.

--Natrona Tribune, Oct. 12, 1893.

Oct. 23. Jack White shot while resisting arrest. v Encountering a friend while on the run, White begged for food, and the friend agreed to help. When he later returned and instead called for White to surrender, White dropped his rifle and went for his gun, whereupon the friend shot him.
Late December. Tom Capehart, working at the Thompson Cattle Co., breaks his leg and is laid up in solomonville (Arizola, Az. Oasis, Dec. 21, 1893).    
Dec. 25. Prisoner Bill Phillips (under his true name of W. T. Wilcox) was constructing a highly detailed clipper ship in the Wyoming State Penitentiary for sale (Wyoming Daily Boomerang, December 26, 1893).    

Late 1893. Logan brother Hank catches pneumonia. Harvey tries to take him by wagon to Arizona to recuperate, but Hank dies enroute near Steamboat Springs, Co.

   

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1894

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

Jan. 29. Butch files against Jack Price for the return of eight head of Billy Nutcher's cattle.    
February. Butch, clowning around, shoots a man in the leg at a dance near Lander, Wy.  

A Rude Awakening.

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They had a dance at the house of Henry Sheards  [Sherard}on the Big Horn the other night and a big time was the result. During the evening there was a great consumption of spiritous Big Horniensis and everybody sang and everybody danced. Tom Welch was overcome at last with mountain dew and went to sleep on a bench. His friends, not wishing to have him miss any of the good things, tried to wake him up. George Cassidy, finding all other means fail, took out his revolver and fired. Unfortunately, the ball entered the sleeper's left leg making an ugly wound six inches long.--Lander Clipper.

--The Salt Lake Herald, Feb. 15, 1894.

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There are anecdotal claims that Tom Welch was there, spying for the Embar ranch, Butch knew he was faking being asleep, and so shot him.Other anecdotes make them out as friends and even participants in the Tipton robbery together.

April. Butch returns to Lander, ready to stand trial.    
July 4. Butch Cassidy is found guilty of stealing horses from John Chapman the previous fall, and sentenced to two years in prison, while Al Hainer was acquitted.    
July 15. Butch Cassidy enters the Wyoming Territorial Prison.    
Aug. 7. Al Hainer and Frank Bryant in the Lander jail, drunk on whiskey from a local prostitute, beat another prisoner half to death over a grudge  

BEATEN IN JAIL.

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TERRIBLE WORK OF TWO TOUGHS AT LANDER.

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Attack on Fellow Prisoner Supposed to have Been Caused By Bad Whisky Furnished Them By Prostitute.

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Lander, Wy. Aug 7. Special. A terrible fight occurred this afternoon in the county Jail here. Frank Bryant and Al Hainer, two notorious outlaws now confined in the county jail assaulted and terribly beat Jo Baldwin a fellow prisoner. It was about 3 o'clock and Baldwin was sitting by the window reading when Bryant came up behind him and struck him on the head with a board, felling him to the floor.

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Baldwin attempted to defend himself when Hainer knocked him down with a chair. They then beat and bruised him to their hearts content. The noise attracted parties to the jail but it was some time before the sheriff could be found and when the jail was opened, Baldwin was badly used up.

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Bryant is an old offender and has been sentenced to three years in the pen for felonious assault and Is now awaiting the action of the supreme court. There is an old grudge between him and Baldwin. Devonia Durant, a prostitute, supplied Hainer with some whisky and he and Bryant were drunk. Baldwin will recover.

--The Salt Lake Herald, Aug. 8, 1894.

Oct. 3. Harvey, Johnnie, and brother-in-law Lee Self assault cowboy James Ross, and are charged with assault.   They were eventually fined, but blamed "Pike" Landusky for setting up the incident as a way to get their ranch, and get them out of the way. This seems to have precipitated Harvey's eventual attack on Landsusky at Christmastime.
  Nov. 19. Mike Brown, Jake Snyder, and another man identified as Harvey Logan rob E. C. Enderly's store in Thermopolis, Wy. In a manner typical of the Currie gang, Snyder first went into the store, pretending to buy goods, then two men entered to rob the place. Snyder was shot as they escaped, and subsequently tried but not convicted. Enderly, in an unpublished account, identified Logan as the man with a gun.
Dec. 22. Harvey Logan shoots "Pike" Landusky.   Landusky was tall, a notorious bully, and there had long been bad blood between he and the Logans, especially when Lonie became involved with step-daughter Cinderalla Athanissa, or "Elfie." Technically a deputy sheriff, one time he had held the Logans in custody, and wound up beating Harvey near senseless, then urinated on him in contempt. At a Christmas gathering for the town, Harvey, seeking vengeance, arrived with Jim Thornhill, walked up behind Landusky, tapped him on the shoulder, then sucker-punched him (with the aid of a pairr of steel knuckles according to the Fergus County Argus, Jan. 10, 1895) when he turned. Hampered by age and a thick coat, Landusky got the worst of the ensuing fight, then went for his gun, a modern automatic whose safety he was unfamiliar with, and failed to get a shot off. Logan then pulled his own gun (or had one tossed to him), and shot Landusky dead, fleeing from the scene. The coroner's inquest found that after Logan ceased beating him, Lanmdusky drew his gun, Logan wrenched away and tossed it, then shot him with his own pistiol. (Great Falls Weekly Tribune, Jan.11, 1895).

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When "Pike" died, it is said that the townspeople buried him six feet deeper than usual and put a large rock on top of his grave so he couldn’t get out. The rock is still there along with a carved wooden grave marker.

Dec. 31. A coroner’s inquest finds Logan guilty of murdering "Pike" Landusky, and a warrant is issued for the arrest of him, Lonie Logan and Jim Thornhill.    After trials, Lonie and Thornhill are found not guilty.

 

   

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1895

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

1895. W. T. Wilcox (Bill Phillips) is released from prosion.    
  1895. Logan works at the 7H ranch in Arizona under the alias of Tom Capehart. Modern historians believe this was not Logan but rather a real person named Tom Capehart, a second-rate, wannabe outlaw.

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Capehart is a shadowy figure in outlaw lore, first noted in 1893, then appearing more frequently in 1895, and finally vanishing in 1900. He seems to have been brought to the WS ranch by Butch Cassidy, and was noted by ranch manager William French as Butch's "right-hand man."

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Traditionally, Capehart was presumed to be an alias for Harvey Logan, but as mentioned, modern historians believe they have proved he was an actual person by that name, wrongly arrested and charged with complicity in the Stein's pass robbery.

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However…

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Whether or not there was a "real" Tom Capehart, French's memoirs leave no question that the man he knew as "Tom Capehart" was in fact the Sundance Kid. (See the notes for Dec. 15, 1905 and Sep. 23, 1906.)

 January. Logan, encountering Sheriff Sid Willis (an acquaintance of his) down by a river in NE Montana, threatens him, but backs down when he learns Willis is seeking other men.   Logan told Willis to dare Choteau county Sheriff George McLaughlin to come get him.
May. According to attorney W. S. Murphy as quoted in the Anaconda Standard, May 8, 1895, Johnnie Logan was charged as a conspirator in the murder of "Pike" Landusky. This is the same time as Lonie was arrested, and it is possible Murphy got the name wrong.    
May 5. Harvey Ray and Louis Henderson steal 70 head of cattle from Owl Creek rancher John L. McCoy, but are apprehended in South Dakota and brought back to Casper for trial. Ray bails out for $1500, but eventually skips.   This seems to be the "real" Harvey Ray, and if so, it is the only bit of mischief of his that I do not attribute to Harvey Logan using his name.
Aug. 27. Jim Thornhill  and Lonie Logan found innocent of the Landusky shooting.    
Summer. Sundance again works at the N Bar N ranch.

Ann Bassett returns from the St. Mary's of the Wasatch Academy in Salt Lake City.

   
September. Harvey Logan, Tom McCarty and Cleophus Dowd party together in the Bucket of Blood Saloon in Linwood, Wy.   Logan then heads to Hole in the Wall and Thermopolis areas.
Oct. 22. A warrant for cattle rustling is issued for Al Hainer and Jake Snider, and they are separately taken into custody, and placed in the Lander jail on the 30th after being unable to make bail.    
Oct. 23. The post office in Powderville. Mt., is robbed, and Postmaster Barnard shot when he goes for his gun. Blame will forever attach itself to the ubiquitous "Currie gang."   We have no idea who was involved in this robbery, though one of the men was supposedly part Indian, going by the name of "Kid Fearless" (Newcastle Democrat, Nov. 7, 1895), who was also wounded in the robbery. But the pattern would be established that every time a post office was robbed, or three men robbed anything in Montana or Wyoming, George Currie and the "Roberts brothers" would get the blame.
Dec. 12. Will Carver and Sam Ketchum are wrongly accused of killing John Powers in Knickerbocker, Tx., forcing them to close their saloon and leave the area, turning to banditry.   Later, Powers’ wife and ranch foreman J. E. Wright are discovered to have orchestrated the murder, but Tom Ketchum admitted being a participant.

 

   

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1896

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

1896. Elza Lay goes to work for Al Davis on his ranch near Maeser, Ut., where he meets his daughter Maude.

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Sundance does some ranching at Ora Haley's second Two Bar ranch on the Little Snake river.

   
Jan. 19. Butch is released from the Laramie, Wy., Territorial Prison.   A petition signed by a variety of leading citizens of Fremont county, including the judge who sentenced him, played a part in the parole (Laramie Semi-weekly Boomerang, Jan. 27, 1896).
Feb. 1. Johnnie Logan is shot by Jim Winters over an ongoing dispute over water rights and a cabin.   Logan drew first, but with his one arm was unable to control his horse, and Winters shot him. John's girlfriend Lucy, the estranged wife of Dan Tressler, later married Jim Thornhill.
Spring. Harvey Logan (Harvey Ray) and Louis Henderson steal 70 head of cattle from Owl Creek rancher John L. McCoy, but are apprehended in South Dakota and brought back to Casper for trial. Logan bails out for $1500, but skips.   I have been unable to find definite dates for the rustling incident, but interestingly, these rustling and jail events seem to happen about the same time Johnnie Curry was shot by Jim Winters--and Harvey is nowhere to be found during the incidents and aftermath! Rustling cattle to South Dakota, then being arrested and sent down to Casper, and raising $1500 bail, then hitting the trail, would explain his mysterious absence!
April 19. Harvey Logan writes a letter to Cleophas Dowd from Kansas City, apologizing for killing a Pinkerton on his property.   Some doubt the authenticity of this letter. 
May 7. Matt Warner, Bill Wall and miner E.B. Coleman have a in shootout near Vernon with Ike and Dick Staunton and David Milton.   Coleman had found a copper strike, but the three men were attempting to jump his claim. Hiring Warner and his friends to drive them off, a shootout erupted as they approached their camp, resulting in Ike Staunton being killed, and the three being charged.
May 27. In Casper, Louis Henderson, captured earlier with Harvey Ray for rustling 20 head of cattle, pleads guilty, and receives 6 years. (Natrona Tribune, May 28, 1896.)    
  Summer. "Flatnose," Logan and Sundance may have stolen a $500 prize stallion from the E. W. Whitcomb ranch near Gillette, Wy. (Nebraska State Journal, July 6, 1897.) The following year when Logan was captured after the Belle Fourche robbery, his horse was able to jump a fence in attempting to escape. This nice stallion may have been the same horse.
Aug. 1. Butch, Elza Lay and Bob Meeks go to work for the Emelle ranch near Cokeville, Wy., in preparation for the Montpelier robbery, scouting the area in their spare time.    
  Aug. 6. Will Carver, and four others, fail at robbing a bank in Nogales, Az. A posse trailing them through Skeleton Canyon was later ambushed, with two men lost.
Aug. 13. Butch Cassidy, Elza Lay and Bob Meeks rob the Montpelier Bank

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Frank Robson, one of the possemen chasing the Nogales robbers, is killed in an ambush in Skeleton canyon.

  Netted $7,165 or $16,000. Initially, they were chased by a deputy (other reports say an attorney) on a bicycle.

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In escaping the posse, Butch placed moccasins on their relay horses (an Indian trick) to avoid leaving tracks.

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During the robbery, Butch--detailed to guard the patrons--was apparently nervous...

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There was a little comedy enacted in the bank at the time of the robbery. The man detailed to guard the six men who were invited inside was evidently a novice at the business. He became very nervous and his hand containing the cocked revolver wavered in a very uncertain manner which kept six of the Montpeliers, well known citizens, in a state of dread although their antics during this trying ordeal were very amusing.

--The Salt Lake Herald, Aug. 15, 1896.

Aug. 26. Butch writes a letter from Vernal, Ut., to Matt Warner’s wife, offering help, and noting that he and Elza Lay had secured a lawyer for her jailed husband.

Somewhere around this time period, he and Elza--who was already experienced in the craft--may have become involved in passing counterfeit money with the Powder Springs gang  
  Sep. 12-13. Traveling salesman, Joe Decker, and a man named Smoot, claim to have met and spoken with Butch Cassidy (whom Decker claimed to have met before) and another man he said was Bob Meeks (though it nay have been Lay) in the Blackburns' hotel in Loa. They asked for dinner, and desired to read about the Montpelier robbery. Decker claimed they borrowed a newspaper and read it together in a barn. On Sunday, the outlaws left, displaying a big wad of cash, and saying they were headed to buy cattle. They also claimed that Butch said Matt Warner's incarceration was set up by Rose Warner because she was afraid her husband would find out about some of her "misdoings," and that both she and her sister were "loose" women. Then they hurriedly ride off toward the Henry mountains. (The Salt Lake Tribune, Sep. 17 and 18, 1896.)  
Sep. 21. Matt Warner and William Wall are convicted of manslaughter in the shooting of Ike Staunton. E.B. Coleman is found not guilty.    
  Oct. 13. Passenger train No. 3 is held up by a lone robber near Ogden, Wy. He was not identified, but he slipped aboard the blind baggage car, crawled over the tender, forced the train to stop near Strawberry bridge, uncoupled the baggage car, and tried to blow up the safe in a robbery identical in style to the Wild Bunch.  
Oct. 18. Butch fails to rob a Union Pacific mining payroll near Rock Springs.   The mine manger, Finley P. Gridley, was popular with everyone in the local saloons, and was warned by an informant that it would be wise not to ship the payroll as usual.
Nov. 26. The Bassetts throw a huge Thanksgiving party for their friends, and Butch and Sundance officiate.   Noteworthy for the fact that Ann Bassett's detailed account did not mention Etta's presence, nor the presence of Maude Lay, though Elza was noted as being there.
Nov. 28. After being arrested and housed in the Thermopolis jail for shooting some cattle and rustling some calves from the Embar ranch, Walt Punteney--on a night when it is 31 degrees below 0--talks the jailer into letting him step outside to use the outhouse, and effects an escape. (Evanston, Wy., News Register, Dec. 5, 1896.)   Most presumed he had to have frozen to death, but apparently friends helped him to escape.
Nov. 30. Bill Phillips, still using his real name of W. T Wilcox, passes a bad check on the 29th, and is arrested the next day.   Phillips talked sheriff Grimmett of Lander into cashing a bad check for $47.50 for him, and was arrested after the bank told Grimmett it was forged. (Natrona Tribune, Dec. 3, 1896.)
  Winter. Butch Cassidy and Elza Lay share a cabin or tent at Robbers Roost with Maude Adams and (supposedly) Etta Place This is the first mention of Etta Place, originally cited by conman "Harry Longabaugh Jr.," who claimed to be Sundance's son. Even so, the story was confirmed by Elza Lay's daughter Marvel and her son Harvey, recalling stories by Maude Adams Lay, who claimed Etta was "Butch's woman at the time." Still, some debate who Butch's friend was. Some speculate it was really Ann Bassett. However, Maude Lay, who probably knew both women, should have known the difference. Maude is also recorded as saying that Etta Place was the most beautiful woman she had ever seen, and Ann Bassett--while decently attractive in one photo but at best average-looking in all her other ones--was no Etta Place, whose looks were legendary.

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If it was Etta, there is no explanation where she came from or went to, nor is there certain mention of her again until late 1899, though she is believed by some to have spent some time in Robbers Roost before that period, which starts her life on the run with Sundance.

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Interestingly, a 1901 article on Elza Lay, though filled with errors, seems to repeat rumors/lore that the Lays had been living in the wild before their divorce.

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While a member of the Robbers Roosters, Lay married a Miss Maude Davis of Uintah county and a boy was born to them while they lived in the Hole in the Wall country, but the young woman took her child and left Lay. Where they are now is not known.

--The Salt Lake Herald, Oct. 26, 1901.

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This is generally consistent with the claim her family makes but for the fact that the author names Hole in the Wall rather than Robbers Roost.* While this cannot be used as an absolute proof text for Maude and Elza dwelling at the Roost, in the author's view it is strong enough evidence to refute the claim the story has no known public iteration prior to Harry Longabaugh Jr.

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* Bob Goodwin, however, points out that Robbers Roost was also know as the "Hole in the Rock" or "Hole in the Wall country" after the Hole in the Rock expedition of the original Bluff settlers in 1879, and so the author may indeed be referring to Robbers Roost, but by an obscure name.

December. Will Carver leaves Arizona for Texas to put a marker on his wife's grave.

   

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1897

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

1897. According to papers from the crime collection of E. P. Lamborn, he was in possession of a 1928 letter by a sheepherder named Edward Crabb, who provided information on a variety of Wild Bunch members, and also noted that "Flatnose" and Logan "cleaned out his sheep camp" in 1897.    
Jan. 4. Sundance (using the name Harry Alonzo), Charley Philbrick, and Bert Charter head to the lower Snake river to set up a Winter camp and keep watch over Reader Co. cattle.

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Ben and Ed Kilpatrick scuffle with neighbors Tom Benge and Oliver Thornton.

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Thornton would eventually be shot by Harvey Logan--though a 1901 newspaper article claimed Kilpatrick admitted shooting him--after an argument over Boone Kilpatrick's hogs.

Jan. 17. Former deputy sheriff John Gitting claimed to have met and camped with Butch on the Green River road near Huntington. Butch spoke of the Montpelier robbery, and mentioned he was on his way to Colorado for a bigger target. (The Salt Lake Tribune, Jan. 21, 1897.)    
Jan. 28. Sundance, Philbrick and Charter are seen in Dixon, heading north.    
March. Lonie and some friends shoot up Jew Jake’s saloon in an attempt to drive him out of town and increase business at Lonie’s saloon.   Jew Jake returned fire with a shotgun, injuring Lonie and another man. All were arrested and charged, but Jake Harris was found not guilty in May, 1897.
March 17 (or 26). Joe Walker survives an ambush by "Gunplay" Maxwell acting as guide for sheriff Ebenezer Tuttle and several others in a canyon at Mexican Bend on the San Rafael river.   Walker wounded Tuttle, then escaped at night.

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Later, Maxwell--apparently hearing that Butch didn't have the stomach to kill a man--would try to make a reputation for himself by threatening to kill Butch if he didn't leave Vernal by nightfall. He wasted no time in leaving himself when Butch rode out to his camp to answer the challenge..

April. Tom O’Day, perhaps with Logan and other members of the Wild Bunch, hold up the Bader ranch.    
April 8 (approx.). "Flatnose" and his gang were spotted near the Half Circle L ranch with 50 head of horses. (Crook County Monitor, April 28, 1897.)    
April 12. After accosting the Logan gang at the post office located at the Grigg homestead and having his shotgun taken from him by Alfred Grigg, who temporarily defused the incident, Deputy Sheriff William Deane follows and tries to arrest the group near the Kaltenbach corrals, and winds up ambushed and killed by George Smith.

Around the same time, Maude Lay is sent home (but first tarries in Green River as the other woman heads to Salt Lake) by Elza as he prepares for the Pleasant Valley Coal Company robbery with Butch. Before this, however, Both Maude and the other woman (either Ann Bassett or Etta Place) who had been staying with Butch, help participate in the Castle Gate robbery by purchasing ammunition and supplies for the robbery, in Price and Salt Lake City.

   Green river, Utah, April 27. With the failure of the Green River posse to catch the Castle Gate robbers, the last hope of their capture short of the San Rafaels was abandoned. If they are to be recaptured, it will be at a great expense and sacrifice of life.

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That the robbers are prepared for a long siege in their stronghold is not doubted here. A few days prior to the robbery, two women who stay with the bandits in the mountains arrived in town and took the westbound train. One of them, it is learned, stopped in Price and bought all the cartridges in that town. The other one proceeded to Salt Lake, where the supply of ammunitions was added to, and with the other provision shipped here. The man who brought the women here remained four days and took the supplies back.

--The Wasatch Wave, April 30, 1897.

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Some, appealing to Charles Kelly's book, attempt to equate the two women with Millie Nelson and Maggie Blackburn, whom Kelly claims obtained supplies and bought out local ammunition. The 1900 census lists a Millie Nelson (born 1869, living in Iron county) and a Margaret Blackburn (born 1860 and living in Wayne county), however Kelly offers no sources for this claim, written decades after the fact, and totally omits mention of Butch's girlfriend, whomever she was, and Maude Lay's known presence at Robbers Roost. Further, he specifically states the women's first appearance and purchase of ammunition was "While the dogs of the law were still barking over the Castle Gate robbery," precluding them from Castle Gate involvement. Also, Maude Lay spoke only of Etta Place living at the Roost, calling into question any claim these women ever actually lived at the camp. Another newspaper report (see the April 24th note) specifically states only two women were living at the Roost, again precluding these two as candidates for the women staying there.

April 14. Around this time, Butch Cassidy arrives in Castle Gate.    
April 21. Butch Cassidy, Elza Lay, and a man named Fowler (or Joe Walker) rob the payroll for employees of the Pleasant Valley Coal Company in Castle Gate, Ut., as it was being unloaded from the train.   Netted $7000-$8000 in bags bag of gold, and currency. They rode south on horseback, apparently headed for Robbers Roost. They were later seen by a Provo deputy with a packhorse and two confederates. Earlier, they had cut the telephone and telegraph lines, which gave them more time to escape, though a train chasing them managed to quickly get word out of the robbery. A hobo named Scanlon was initially arrested in Castle Gate for having been seen drinking with them beforehand.

A Castle Gate posse, setting up an ambush, wrongly started shooting at a Huntington posse by mistake.

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A robbery witness described Lay as wearing a black hat, blue coat, and goggles. One rode a gray horse, and one a bay horse. One of them was bearded at the time

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After being robbed, Paymaster Carpenter did not order more gold, but paid the miners in checks, saying, "Paymaster Cassidy of Robbers Roost will honor the Paper."

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HOLDUP IN UTAH

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MR. CARPENTER'S EXPERIENCE WITH ROBBERS ROOST GANG

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THEY MADE A BIG HAUL

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CAUGHT HIM WITH EIGHT THOUSAND DOLLARS AS HE LEFT THE TRAIN ONE PAY DAY--THE DESPERADOES HAVE AVOIDED CAPTURE

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E. L. Carpenter of Salt Lake, general sales agent for the Pleasant Valley coal mine, whose mines are located at Castlegate, Utah, is in the city, arranging to place his coal on the Batte market. Mr. Carpenter is the official of the Pleasant Valley company who had an unpleasant experience with highwaymen at Castlegate last Spring. For years, he had been in the habit to pay the miners in a couple of big sacks and starting for the mines, always taking the Rio Grande Western train which reaches Castlegate about noon. His habits in this regard had become so fixed that it was little trouble for a couple of desperadoes to know just when to expect him and lay their plans for holding him up with very few chances.

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There is a band of desperadoes in Southern Utah knows as the "Robbers Roost gang" who make the San Rafael mountain their stronghold and who have for years conducted all manner of thieving, from cattle stealing to robbing banks, with almost utter immunity, but they had never dome business in that particular locality and the presence of the gang in that community was not suspected. Mr. Carpenter's oft-repeated visits to the mines without molestation had rendered the trip so commonplace that he had come to make it without any thought of interruption and so on this particular occasion he stepped off the train with his money bag and started for the company's store as usual unattended except by a young man in his employ to whom he had handed a third bag which he had found it necessary to take along this time, and which contained silver for making change.

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The store was about 20 rods from the station and he reached the walk in front of it, two men dressed like the miners who were loitering about and who appeared to be part of them stepped suddenly in front of him. As they did so they each drew a gun from under the blue blouses they wore and ordered him to give them his money bags. The action was so sudden and unexpected that although two dozen or more men were in the immediate vicinity they were all so astonished that no one thought of interfering Mr. Carpenter had nothing to do but give up for he recognized in one of the men. or thought he did, "Butch" Cassidy. the leader of the Robbers' Roost gang, who is well known all over Utah. His reputation is such that Mr. Carpenter, believing It was he, readily gave over the money without any parlay. knowing It meant instant death to refuse. The robbers took the two bags of gold and ran to a couple of horses that stood hitched nearby, but which no one appeared to have noticed until the men made rapidly away before any of the onlookers had time to collect his senses.

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The only person who appeared to have any presence of mind, who was in a position to do anything, was the young fellow carrying the silver. He was nearer the store door than Mr. Carpenter and either because he was too quirk for the robbers or they, judging wisely that the paymaster carried the great bulk of the money, paid little attention to him, succeeded in dodging inside the store and dropping his bag on the floor, he ran to a gun rack and took down a Winchester. Some cartridges sat in boxes on the counter and he grabbed a handful and loaded the gun as he ran back to the door.

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Meantime, the robbers had been getting their bags and themselves on their horses and were just about a rifle shot away when he reached the door with the gun. He aimed quickly and fired, but in the excitement his aim was poor and he missed, and Cassidy, for it has since been virtually proved it was he, turned in his saddle and fired back. He was riding at break neck speed by this time, but his celebrated marksmanship was demonstrated by the fact that the ball struck the door casing against which the lad was leaning to rest his gun. It was such a close call that it took the fight out of the youngster and he discreetly retired. It was well he did. for Cassidy's next shot would have done for him.

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The robbers with their plunder, something over $8000, headed for their favorite mountains and. although tempting rewards were offered and sheriffs and their posses scoured the country for weeks, sometimes closing in so close upon the bandits that it seemed they must be taken, they escaped and have never been captured. The hunt has never been entirely abandoned, but few men care to take chances with the gang in their San Rafael mountain range, which they know so well and passes that are almost impossible to any except them.

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That experience was enough and Mr. Carpenter now goes amply guarded to the mines on pay day.

--The Anaconda Standard, Sep. 17, 1897.

April 24. The St. George Union confirms two women having been living in the mountains with outlaws, and notes they gave the names of all the outlaws living there--except two.

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Two men arrive in Springville, asking for newspapers detailing the Castle Gate robbery, and a posse is sent out after them (San Francisco Call, April 25, 1897).

 

ON THE SAN RAFAEL: GIRLS AND OUTLAWS.

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There is a carious condition of things and withal an undesirable one over in the eastern part of Emery County just at present; a condition which has brought about and causes considerable apprehension among the people over the mountains. There seem to be at least two fully organized and practically unhampered bands of outlaws in that region, whose dominion is as absolute as Abduhl Hamid's and whose operations are simply the unquestioned offspring of their own good will. Parties who have just been over there have interesting things to relate. There are two combinations firmly entrenched in those impregnable mountain fastnesses; one is located toward the north, the other is southward on the San Rafael. Reports say that several herds of cattle have been driven north and a good many sold, principally at Price. One peculiar circumstance also is that while the severe winter necessarily has preyed upon the sheep, the poor ones have fared remarkably well and the fat ones have apparently succumbed. The weather has probably not had so much to do with this as living, moving bipeds, however. They seem to do just as they please, and remain as unmolested as the gentle Castle Valley breezes. It is a typical wild west show realistically repeated. The outlaws live among "breakes," the wildest, most rugged and inaccessible except to the initiated anywhere under the blue firmament. In recesses cut into the side of those yawning chasms, two or three men are able to hold an army at bay. To such places all who have stolen, robbed or murdered are welcomed so that the gangs are becoming augmented steadily as time goes on. They live in huts made of raw-hides, thus being pretty effectively ensconced from the whistling of winter blasts and furiously drifting snow. But they are not confined to one sex. There are females forming that motley combination. It is positively asserted by parties who are in a position to know that in the one camp are two girls who seem to enjoy that novel existence and immensely comfort their male consorts. That smacks of the romantic. It is also stated quite emphatically by certain knowing ones that Sheriff Burn's slayers are there.

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Rumor is an unstable element, of course, but some time ago there was a change of femininity: two girls came back to one of the Emery Co. towns. They gave the names of all the outlaws except two. The identity of those two even an inquisition could not have wrenched from them.

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Here is a glaring example of the perversity of human nature. Think of young girls out in the wildest wilderness where nature has turned summersaults, under the benign care of a band of the rot arid scum of border civilization.

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These bands do exist to the mortal terror of a great many and incalculable disaster to others. The problem of ousting them is a grave question. There is no use in attempting to dislodge them by force a good big military force would be inadequate. The only way would be to starve them out and it is questionable if that is feasible.--Manti Messenger.

--St. George Union, April 24, 1897.

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The "two girls" are almost unquestionably a reference to Maude Lay and Butch Cassidy's girlfriend, whomever she was. Unfortunately, despite exhaustive searching, I cannot find the names of these two women!

May 14. Southern Pacific westbound #20 robbed by Will Carver and Tom Ketchum.   Carver and Ketchum climbed into the engine and ordered the engineer to stop the train at the next siding. They dynamited express car safe and departed with $42,000.
May 24. Joe Walker robs a peddler between Huntington and Price, Ut.  

BUTCH CASSIDAY'S GANG

Hold Up and Rob a Pedlar Near Huntington

JOE WALKER RECOGNIZED AS ONE OF THE HIGHWAYMEN

Judge Johnson's Court Was Made a Arsenal Last Monday and Wednesday on Account of a Rumor of a Rescue-A Calf Thief Convicted-Good People Talk of Organizing a Vigilance Committee-Charlie Clawson Convicted of Adultery and Sentenced to One Year.

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Special to The Herald. Castle Dale Utah May 27. The nefarious Robbers Roost gang are again at work and unless something is done to rid this country of the crowd there will be a veritable reign of terror here soon. On Monday last a pedlar named William Short who has been selling vegetables to the miners at Castle Gate was held up and robbed by two men in between Huntington and Price The robbery was committed right in sight of a team load of people in broad daylight. The pedlar had been very lucky on his trip and had $79 with him and it is presumed the two men who held him up were aware of this fact. He was approached from behind and ordered to throw up his hands which he did. Then while one of the men covered him with his gun, the other went through him, taking all that he had. He was then told to drive on and make himself scarce in that neighborhood. The men then rode away.

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One of the men was recognized as the famous Joe Walker one of the notorious of the gang in which Butch Cassidy figures so extensively. The other man the pedlar did not know. The officers down here are afraid to go after the men The country is in a state of terror because of their depredations it is well known that there is a large gang of them and they hove so many friends they can successfully defy the officers of the law.

--The Salt Lake Herald, May 28, 1897.

  Late May through Fall. According to Fred Hillman, his father hired Butch to work on their ranch in NE Wyoming for several months. However, Butch is commonly thought to have drifted down to New Mexico with Elza Lay to work at the WS, and sightings of Butch do not jibe with him ranching. There is speculation the man working at the ranch was Bill Phillips, who may have been impersonating Butch even then. However, Phillips was in jail in June, though this can be explained away in a variety of ways.
  June. The Belle Fourche robbers (or other unknown thieves) may have been active in the area of Wolton, Wy., first taking 20 head of horses from the Swift Co. on June 2. (Interestingly, Tom O'Day had a check on him for $400 when arrested in Belle Fourche for having sold some sort of livestock.)  
June 12. The sheriff at Rawlins receives word that Butch Cassidy is leading a band of up to 20 outlaws in the Bitter Creek area, intending to pull a train robbery. Trains in the region immediately hire gaurds, and no robbery materializes.    
June 15 Dick Thompson and Waterhole Stevens, with surreptitious help by Bob Meeks, rob Charley Guild's post office/saloon in Ft. Bridger, Wy.   Guild, realizing Meeks was in on the robbery, kept him at gunpoint until his wife came to see why he was late in returning home for the night. Then tied him up and held him for the sheriff.
June 20. Bill Phillips (under his true name of W. T. Wilcox), arrested and charged with forgery, pleading not guilty (Wind River Mountaineer, June 21, 1897)   I am unsure whether this was the earlier incident or an entirely new forgery incident. It seems to be a new incident.
June 26. The Belle Fourche robbers set up camp outside town.    
June 27. Tom O’Day is sent into Belle Fourche to scout the bank, and winds up getting drunk at Sebastion's saloon.    
June 28. Sundance*, Harvey Logan, Walt Punteney, "Flatnose" Currie, Tom “Peep” O’Day, and Indian Billy Roberts rob the Belle Fourche Bank.

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* Some modern  historians claim Sundance was ranching and did not participate in the robbery. However, he was identified by a number of witnesses.

  Netted $97 because the safe’s time lock wouldn’t activate for another 30 minutes. Tom O’Day, drunk at Sebastion’s Saloon, failed to do his job, wound up hiding in an outhouse after his horse ran off, and was arrested for suspiciously having a check for around $400 on him.

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According to a newspaper account, two of the robbers had carbines with octagon barrels, while a third had one with a round barrel:

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Billings. Sept. 26th. The parties now in jail for the Belle Fourche robbery have been identified. Assistant Cashier Ticknor of the Butte County bank went to the Jail this morning in company with Sheriff Butts and |positively identified the two men calling themselves Jones as the two Roberts brothers who were in the robbery. The other prisoner calling himself Smith [Puntney], he was not so positive about, but thinks he was the last of the robbers to leave the bank. He described before seeing them the guns the robbers had as short Winchester carbines, two with octagon barrels, and one with a round barrel. The guns captured with the prisoners corresponded with his description.

--The Anaconda Standard, Sep. 27, 1897.

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During the chase, one of the robbers' horses wore out, and two of the robbers had to double up. (Laramie Weekly Boomerang, July 8, 1897.)

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Walt Punteney later claimed they had actually robbed a significant amount from the bank, allowing him to purchase a nice ranch.

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Walt Punteney's fanciful account:

“It happened a few years back. There was a time Tom O’Day, a couple of other fellows and I robbed a bank.”

Walt then told of the day he and his friends were engaged in a conversation outside Happy Jack’s [In Thermopolis, Wy.], talking quietly among themselves. Suddenly they mounted their horses and rode out of town together. Such a scene, even in “my” time, meant a job had been planned. And the upshot of that particular discussion was that they would ride to Belle Fourche, SD., and rob a bank.

But somewhere between Thermopolis and Belle Fourche, the conspirators calculated the projected take from the bank would not fit their needs and, concluding they needed additional cash flow, made hasty plans to rob a saloon,* in which a massive steel safe harbored the House’s share of the considerable gambling revenues.

Upon arrival in Belle Fourche, Tom O’Day tied his horse outside the saloon while the others entered the bank. Apparently they had failed to agree on a schedule, because as Tom was leaning against the walnut bar, sipping from a shot of whiskey, all hell broke loose down the street, in the direction of the bank.

O’Day, cursing, ran outside upon hearing the shots. He was just in time to see Punetney, a sack of silver coins thrown over his shoulder, and his other friends leap onto their horses, throw some shots at a gathering, angry mob of the town’s citizens, and make their break from Belle Fourche, pursued by numerous rifle shots and threats from the locals.

“I’ll get ‘em, I’ll get ‘em!” O’Day shouted, running for his horse. But just as he mounted, a stray shell crashed into the animal’s hoof. His horse reared and O’Day tumbled to the ground. Getting up and dusting himself off, he immediately knew time was of the essence. Latching onto a mule which had also been tethered at the hitchrack, he jumped aboard. Trotting past the bank he was heard to yell, “I’ll pursue the varmints, Boys! I’ll get ‘em!”

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As he passed the bank, futilely kicking the mule to try and pick up some speed, someone shouted, “He’s one of them!”

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Before Tom O’Day knew what was happening, a shell from a Winchester buried itself in his shoulder, and he flew out of the saddle and lay on the ground, dazed.

.

In the meantime, Walt Punteney was faring a little, but not much, better. Several miles out of town, the posse of about twenty irate citizens closed in on him. Suddenly a rifle shot caught him just above the right shoulder blade, blowing him off the horse an into a muddy irrigation ditch, where he lay motionless.

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“It was the sack,” Walt said. “Damn! When the shell hit it, it crashed into that sack of silver. The impact was terrific, and I’m sure it saved my life because the posse rode past, thinking I was deader ‘n hell.

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Everybody except Tom O’Day made a safe getaway. And since the jail in Belle Fourche had recently burned down during an escape attempt, he was incarcerated for three weeks in the iron cell which rose like a bear cage above the charred rubble, and in which he was exposed to the elements and the jeers of contemptuous passersby.

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“What ever happened to the money in the sack?” I asked.

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“Oh yeah, the money, “ Walt grinned. “Well, the sack was pretty well torn as you can imagine. And some of the silver was scattered all over that ditch and across the trail. It was a mess. Now, I ain’t makin’ no confessions, understand? But you must agree, Tim, I got a right nice little homestead…”

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* This account, though filled with inaccuracies, is important because it accords with tradition and places O'Day in Sebastion's Saloon, which some other contemporary accounts contradict, placing him at the bank instead. O'Day's alibi was also that he was at the saloon, and there were witnesses that placed him there.

--From Tim McCoy remembers the West.

July. An informant for Carbon county Sheriff Davis infiltrates the Powder Springs gang for 10 days, hoping to lead to the capture of Butch Cassidy. (Rawlins Republican, Oct. 22, 1897.)    
July 4. Butch is seen and spoken to in Jack Ryan's saloon in Baggs, Wy.   He was reportedly staying at a cabin in the Powder Springs area.
July 7. After his preliminary hearing, an effort is made to lynch Tom O'Day that night, but Belle Fourche deputies remove him to safety before a lynch mob can get to him. (Laramie Weekly Boomerang, July 8, 1897.)    
Mid July (approx.). On returning to Venal, Jeff Wilcox claimed to have met Butch Cassidy and Elza Lay, along with around ten members of the Wild Bunch, in Brown's Park. (The Salt Lake Tribune, July 23, 1897.)    
July 13. After being accused of being a leader of the Robbers Roost gang by Joe Bush, "Gunplay" Maxwell writes a denial to the Salt Lake Tribune, promising to defend himself if attacked.   Editor Tribune--in your paper of July 9th is an article titled "Robbers Roost Campaign." In this article you assert that I am a leader of the Robbers Roost gang. I understand that a reward of $2500 is offered for any member of this gang, dead or alive. Let every man who has a thimbleful of brains put himself in my place. What will he do? Guard himself. As a member of the gang he cannot do otherwise.

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Joe Bush says: "Do you supposed Moore, Maxwell or any of the gang would have treated me that way if they had once got the drop on me?" Perhaps Mr. Bush is talking for $2500. At least I look at it that way. If I am worth that much to the State dead, I and worth double that amount to myself living. There are men in the gang that I am acquainted with, but that is no proof that I am a member. I am well acquainted with that country, and from all reports Mr. Bush knows nothing of that country or the men. They arrested John Griffith for a bluff. He is a hard-working, inoffensive man and has nothing to do with the gang.

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I wish to say that I am not a member of the gang, nor do I want to be, but if I am considered as such, I shall certainly guard myself. As such I have nothing to expect but death. In this case I am capable of defending myself. I don't wish to kill any one, but I may be compelled to if this is not retracted. Please Mr. Bush don't kill me for that $2500. I live on Nine Mile, Brooks Postoffice. C. L. Maxwell.

--Salt Lake Tribune, July 13, 1897.97/

July 23. CY ranch foreman, Bob Devine, gathers a small force of cowhands from several ranches, and heads into Hole in the Wall with Joe LeFors, where they meet up with Bob Taylor and some rustlers. In the ensuing battle, Devine and his son are wounded, and Taylor killed.    
July 26. After some sheepmen are robbed near Vernal and the McKee boys are arrested for the deed, the Salt Lake Herald makes the first use of the term "Wild Bunch" in connection with a gang it believes to be a myth. (A few days earlier, on the 22nd, the Vernal Express used the term in reference to the McKees.) It was the opinion of a great many people that the work was done by the "wild bunch," but as no such gang is known to exist, only in imagination, the sheepmen are satisfied they have the right men..
July 27. A letter from Devine appears in the Casper Tribune, calling for action against the rustlers, prompting a subsequent letter from them, threatening revenge if anyone tries coming into Hole in the Wall.  

Bob Devine

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You think you have played hell you have just begun you will get your dose there is men enough up here yet to kill you and we are going to get you yet or lose twelve more men you must stay out of this country if you want to live we are not going to take any chances any more but we will get you any way we can. We want one hair a piece out of that d--- old chin of yours you have given us the worst of it all the way through and you must stay out or die you had better keep your d--- outfit out if you want to keep them don't stick that d--- old gray beard of yours in this country again if you don't want it shot off. We are the twelve men appointed a purpose to get you if you don't stay out of here.

Revenge. Sange.

-- Natrona County Tribune, July 29, 1897.

July 29. Butch Cassidy and Elza Lay, together with other associates of the Wild Bunch, party together first in Dixon and then in Baggs, Wy. Some time after this, Butch and Elza go to work for the WS ranch in Alma, NM. Harvey Logan, Sundance, Walt Punteney, and "Flatnose" Currie may have been there as well, but this seems unlikely.

Local storekeepers in Baggs didn't have enough silver to make change for all the gold taken from Castle Gate so Butch paid a messenger to ride to a town 80 miles away and change $500 in gold for $400 in silver so they could buy supplies and otherwise spend the take. (The Salt Lake Herald, Sep. 12, 1899.)

July 31. A posse of 10 men, led by Sheriff Butts from Belle Fourche, leaves Casper to join 25 others who left the day before in an incursion into Hole-in-the-Wall in search of the Belle Fourche robbers.  

HOLE-IN-THE-WALL WAR.

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MORE ARMED MEN START FOR THE FRONT.

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A Force of Fifty Men Are Now Marching Against the Outlaws and Will Be Joined By as Many More.

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(Special to The Herald.) Casper, Wyo. July 31. Another armed body of men left Casper early this morning for the Hole-in-the-Wall country in search of cattle thieves and bank robbers. The party was led by Sheriff Butts of Belle Fourche with six deputies and about ten well armed cowboys. Sheriff Sproal of Johnson county who returned to Buffalo this morning informed the South Dakota sheriff and deputies that he, Sproal did not send for them, that he could take care of the robbers, and would give them no protection, and if they went into the rendezvous of the outlaws it would be at their own risk. It is believed here that Sheriff Sproal is either in league with the outlaws or else he is afraid to proceed against them. Altogether, about 50 well-armed men have left here for the Hole-in-the-Wall to be joined by as many more from other sections. all determined to protect the property of the cattlemen and honest small ranchmen.

--The Salt Lake Herald, Aug. 1, 1897.

Summer. Ben Kilpatrick abandons his wife and children. Will Carver is in Idaho, and meets the Wild Bunch.    
  July. A string of horses seem to have been stolen from the Camp Crook, SD., area by the Belle Fourche robbers. (Laramie Weekly Boomerang August 5, 1897.)  
August. According to Donna Ernst, Sundance leaves his job at the Reader ranch outside Savery, Wy.     
  August-September? A surgeon from Billings is sent for to set a leg for a man in a group that may have been the Belle Fourche robbers. (Casper, Wy. Derrick, Oct. 11, 1897.)  
Aug. 1 (approx.). The Butte County Bank offers a reward of $2500 for the apprehension--or $675 for information leading to the capture of any one of--"George Curry, Harvey Ray, and the Roberts Brothers." (The Salt Lake Herald, Aug. 9, 1897.)   This is curious, given the (supposed) fact that they only got away with under $100.
Aug. 5 The Butte County Bank offers a reward of $2500 for the apprehension--or $675 for information leading to the capture of any one of--"George Curry, Harvey Ray, and the Roberts Brothers." (The Salt Lake Herald, Aug. 9, 1897 and Laramie Weekly Boomerang, Aug. 5, 1897.)   This is curious, given the (supposed) fact that they only got away with under $100. This can only be for cashier Marble's ear being partially shot off.
  Aug. 2. Logan and another masked man may have robbed the Lander-Rawlins mail stage at Lost Soldier station.  
Aug 4. While it has nothing to do with the Wild Bunch, it's too interesting not to report that the famous cigar-shaped airship of 1897 seen flying around the US was spotted over Ogden. "Cigar shaped, with a light at either end…the queer craft possessed marvelous agility and changed its course, turned abruptly around, and rose and lowered at will." (American Eagle Aug 5, 1897.)    
Aug. 6. Maude Lay gives birth to daughter Marvel.   She then pressures Elza to settle down, separates from him when he won’t, and then divorces him.
Aug. 10. Bob Devine, this time with a larger force, leads another foray into Hole in the Wall, recovering 700 head of cattle from the rustlers.    
  Aug. 18. Up to 75 rustlers led by "Flatnose" Currie and Harvey Logan rendezvous with Butch and his gang. After the loss of the Power Springs leader Dick Bender (believed by some to be the patriarch of the "Bloody Benders" of Kansas, who murdered guests at their inn), Butch supposedly met with the gang and emerged as a sort of titular leader of both the Powder Springs and Hole in the Wall gangs. Subsequent to this in 1898, he supposedly suggested they all explore the idea of joining the Army to fight in the Spanish-American war in return for amnesty, which was rejected. Out of that meeting, Butch is said to have formed the Train Robbers Syndicate.
  September. Butch probably headed to Brown's Park, and then down to New Mexico.  
Sep. 3. Black Jack and Tom Ketchum, together with Dave Adkins, Will Carver (alias G.W. Franks) and either Bruce "Red" Weaver, alias Charles Collings, or Harvey Logan, rob the Denver-Fort Worth Express of the Colorado & Southern near Folsom, NM.

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Members of the Hole in the Wall gang sponsor a turkey shoot in the town of Cooper, Wy. (Wyoming Derrick, Sep. 8, 1897.)

  Found no money, but took some fruit and whiskey. Logan, who was arrested a short time later in Wyoming, probably did not participate.

.

.

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They started out charging an entrance fee of a quarter, then got confident and upped the charge to $1, but the winner was local man, N. R. Gascho.

Sep. 7. Bob Meeks sentenced to 35 years for the Montpelier robbery.    
Sep. 8. Sheriff Davis of Carbon county and his posse raid Powder Springs, looking for Butch Cassidy, but find two other men. (Rawlins Republican, Oct. 22, 1897.)    
Sep. 10. According to a letter found by a Wild Bunch robbery victim in a hat he was forced to take in trade for his own in April of 1898, Butch Cassidy left Robbers Roost with Charlie "Gunplay" Maxwell and Joe Walker on this date.    
  Sep. 10 (approx.) The Belle Fourche robbers may have come out of Hole in the Wall, where they had been hiding, intending to rob the bank at Red Lodge. (Buffalo, Wy., Bulletin, Sep. 30 1897.)  
Sep. 18. The Belle Fourche robbers, on being accosted by marshal Byron St. Clair of Red Lodge, Mt, try to convince St. Clair to leave town and go fishing so they can rob the bank.    
Sep. 20. A posse, consisting of Sheriff John Dunn, Stock Inspector WD Smith, Dick Hicks, H. C. Calhoun, Con Mendenhall, and lawyer Oscar Stone from Red Lodge, goes on the hunt for the robbers.    
Sep. 22. After being spotted earlier in the H. C. Jolly saloon in Lavina, Sundance, Punteney and Logan are captured at 5 PM on the way to Red Lodge, Mt., intending to rob its bank.   Logan was wounded and shot through the wrist. Sundance was never identified by name with this group (though we know he used the name "Harry Alonzo" in summoning friends to provide an alibi according to the Buffalo People's Voice, or else his friends gave it to the press when they went to Deadwood), but is traditionally believed to have been the third man after Logan and Punteney.

THREE DESPERADOES CAUGHT.

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They Helped Rob the Bank of Bell Fourche S. D., Last June.

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BlLLINGS, Mont, Sept. 24. Sheriff Dunn of Carbon county and a posse have effected the capture of three men who were implicated in the robbery of Clay, Robinson Co.'s bank at Belle Fourche, S. D., last June, when the cashier was shot and several thousand dollars in currency was stolen. The men were captured north of Billings in the Mussel Shell country.

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They were seen in Red Lodge on Sunday, and the Sheriff immediately began preparations to follow them. He called in two well-known stock detectives, who had been after these men before for cattle stealing, and called on several citizens to add to the strength of the posse. Knowing the desperate character of the men, Sheriff Dunn gave orders to take them dead or alive.

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The posse followed the robbers' trail for three days, and came upon the desperadoes at 5 o'clock on Wednesday evening, just as they were going into camp. Two men were getting water at a spring and the other was picketing the horses. On being summoned to surrender, the two men at the spring jumped over a bank and attempted to defend themselves, but whenever they showed their heads the deputies fired, and finally they surrendered. The man with the horses parleyed, and getting behind a horse drew his revolver. A shot from a deputy's rifle went through the horse's neck and hit the robber's wrist, causing him to drop his revolver.

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He mounted, and his horse ran a mile before it fell, shot dead. He then surrendered. The names of the desperadoes cannot be learned at this time, as only a brief account of the affair has been received.

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There is a reward of $625 for the capture of each of these robbers. Ever since the robbery last June, the authorities of South Dakota, Wyoming and Montana have been on the lookout for them. Until recently they have been hiding in the Jackson Hole country, where cattle rustlers and desperadoes are hard to capture. They are known to have been implicated in cattle stealing in Custer county.

--The New York Sun, Sep. 25, 1897.

..

We saw Putney ride up to the top of a hill to take a view of the country and we approached the camp within rifle range as Kid Currie was unsaddling his horse. We threw down on him and commanded him to throw up but instead of obeying the summons he got on the other side of his horse pulled his six shooter and threw it down over the back of the animal. The next instant a rifle ball from my gun struck Currie in the wrist and turned him around several times. He then sprang on the horse and started for the hills. As he came to a wire fence his horse was shot in jumping the fence and landed dead on other side. Currie started off on foot.

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In the meantime, part of the posse had captured the other two members of the gang and went in search of Currie. I saw him about a mile distant in the hills and I rode around and crawled up within a short distance of where he lay partly concealed behind a sand hill. I told him he had better come out of there and in reply he held up his bloody hand and said he was shot in the breast and was dying. He didn’t look to me like a dying man and I told him that if he didn’t come over to where I was I’d tear down that sand hill. This had the desired effect and he came a running. He was entirely disarmed and I went back to the sand hill and found his two six shooters and a belt full of cartridges buried in the sand..

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We took the three outlaws to Billings and turned them over to the officers of South Dakota and they were placed in the Deadwood Jail along with Tom O’Day to await trial. Pending the sitting of the court, they broke Jail and O’Day and Putney were captured three days afterward but the Roberts boys succeeded in making good their escape. Putney and O’Day afterward established an alibi and were discharged from custody.

--Account by Sheriff John Dunn of Carbon county, The Salt Lake Herald, Sep. 5, 1901.

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In the fight, another horse was shot and fell on one of the robbers (Casper, Wy. Derrick, Oct. 11, 1897.)

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If this was Sundance, and he was the man whose leg was set by a doctor back in August or September, this may have re-injured the limb, and could have caused permanent damage, accounting for his ongoing leg problems, which have anecdotally been attributed to a bullet wound.

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Seven horses were actually found with the robbers, the extra probably being intended for a relay team. During Logan's attempted escape, his horse was without saddle or bridle. (Buffalo, Wy., Bulletin, Sep. 30 1897.)

Sep. 25. Belle Fourche bank employee, Harry Ticknor, identifies Sundance, Punteney and Logan as the robbers.   They waive extradition, and are sent to Deadwood, SD., for trial 

Oct. 2. Logan, Punteney and O’Day are voluntarily photographed at the H. R. Locke studio, but Sundance refuses.   Logan appears to have been bribed with a cigarette in order to pose for the photo.

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After he received a reward for the capture Detective Hicks purchased new hats for the three robbers (Natrona County Tribune, Oct. 7, 1897), who posed with them in their photos.

Week of Oct. 3. A government surveyor named Glafke is robbed by members of the Hole in the Wall gang while surveying mountains in Johnson county, losing camp equipment and horses. (Wyoming Derrick, Oct. 19, 1897.)    
Oct. 3. The Belle Fourche robbers--including Sundance (using the name Frank Jones), Logan and Punteney--appear at a preliminary hearing where they are identified by three witnesses. Unable to make bail, they are bound over for trial.   As reported in the Nebraska State Journal, October 4, 1897…

PROTEST THEIR INNOCENCE.

Belle Fourche Bank Robbers Playing a Bold Game.

BELLE FOURCHE, S. D. Oct. 3-

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(Special.)-The three alleged bank robbers giving their names as Tom and Frank Jones and Walter Putney, who were held in jail at Deadwood to await their trial, were given their preliminary trial in this city Friday with the result that they were all held to the grand Jury for $10,000 each. They were taken back to Deadwood in default of ball. The prisoners firmly protested their innocence and declare that they never knew there was such a man as ["Flatnose"] Currie or such a place as Belle Fourche. They were all three Identified positively, however, by three witnesses, who were in Belle Fourche at the time of the robbery. An attempt was made to obtain a picture of the prisoners at a photograph gallery, but through the contortions they made it was unsuccessful

Oct. 7. On the run, Carver and the Ketchums arrive in Cochise county.    
Oct. 12. David Gillespie writes a letter to his mother in which he claims an unnamed "young fellow" accused of the Belle Fourche robbery was working with him through August 1st, and so couldn't be guilty.   The unnamed man, presumed to be Sundance by his defenders, is noted as having been shot in the arm and having his horse shot out from under him during capture--which can only refer to Harvey Logan! This could be the basis for author Doug Engebretson concluding, in an otherwise well-researched magazine article and book, that Logan wasn't even a participant at Belle Fourche.
Oct. 22. An unnamed South Dakota lawyer arrives in Casper, asserting some of the men in jail for the Belle Fourche robbery were in the Big Horn Basin when it happened, and were innocent. He claimed to be in the hire of the men in jail, specifically naming Punteney as one of the innocent men. (Wyoming Derrick, Oct. 28, 1897.)   He left the next morning for the Big Horn Basin in search of witnesses.

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The lawyer, while not named in the first article, was apparently clerk J. P. Hymer, from the law office of Temple & Mclanghlin in Deadwood. (Wyoming Derrick, Nov. 4,1897.)

Week of Oct 30. J. Galloway and E. Lahey, friends of Sundance, attempt to see him after he contacts them for an alibi to the Belle Fourche robbery.   Officials reject their claim he was ranching with them, and deny their request to see him, pointing out that Sundance had already been identified by more than one witness to the crime as a participant, and that a reward had been paid for his capture.

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Walt Punteney, it should be noted, had the same sort of alibi--friends testifying that he was ranching with them during the time.

Oct. 31. The Belle Fourche robbers break out of jail, but Punteney and O’Day are caught on Nov. 2.

FOUR OUTLAWS BREAK JAIL

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Brute strength helps them out of the Deadwood lockup.

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They Arm themselves to the Teeth in the Jail arsenal and shoot several citizens as they flee--200 men chasing them into the badlands, whence they can hardly escape.

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Deadwood, S. D., Nov. 1. The notorious Curry Gang of bandits broke jail just before midnight last night, and, after exchanging several dozen shots with several citizens who encountered them accidentally, made their escape to the mountains. The daring of the escape is worthy of the notorious men who accomplished it.

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The fugitives are Tom O' Day, Frank Jones, Tom Jones, and Walter Putney. They ripped the bars from their strong cells by brute strength, assaulted the jailer with their bare hands, and reached the open air. The Jailor was alarmed, but the ferocity and daring of the men was too much for him. The first he knew that trouble was coming, was when the side of the big steel cage in which the bandits were confined gave way before their united strength, and with a roar the men broke down the wooden partition and burst into the view of the astonished guard. He drew a revolver. It was knocked from his hands, and as he drew another it was dashed to the floor. The plucky man then reached for a big knife lying near, and as the four men threw themselves upon him he clashed at them until he lost consciousness. When he revived an hour later he was covered with wounds, but was able to tell the story.

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As the jail was a regular armory, the men had no trouble in selecting a supply of the finest weapons. Each got a rifle, four revolvers, and a quantity of ammunition. They rushed boldly from the place, and started on a run across lots, toward the hills. They ran over Pete Belle, a special mine watchman, a block away. He was knocked down, but armed with a revolver and, taking in the situation, began shooting. In an instant, a wild scene was being enacted.

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Citizens gathered from all directions, and the outlaws retreated into the dense forests of the mountains, turning and firing as the pursuers gained upon them. Streams of fire followed them from two dozen revolvers in the hands of as many citizens. That a number of men were not killed is due wholly to chance and the darkness.

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Fred Swobe was desperately wounded. Frank Elliott was shot through the body, and several other citizens were injured more or less. If the outlaws were hurt there was nothing to indicate the fact. In truth, they seemed to enjoy their wild dash, and repeatedly called to the posse to come up to the mountain and fight it out. They finally disappeared in the hills, making for that section known as the Bad Lands.

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All day a posse of 200 citizens have been chasing the fugitives, but has failed to get within shooting distance of them. It is scarcely within the limit of possibility that they can escape, yet the desperate fellows are making a remarkable effort. They were put into Jail a few months ago after a most desperate resistance in which all of them received from one to a dozen wounds. The men are still suffering from these wounds.

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They were surprised while robbing the Bank of Belle Fourche and were badly wounded, though all but O'Day succeeded in escaping to the Big Horn basin, where they were caught.

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These are the leading members of the {"Flatnose"] Curry gang, and they are known as the most desperate band of outlaws in the West. It is generally understood that they will be killed on sight.

--New York Sun, Nov. 2, 1897.

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Along with them was a black man, William Moore, wanted for murdering either Frank Stacy (over a dog) (Nebraska State Journal, Nov. 9, 1897), a woman (Kerry Ross Boren), or two woodchoppers (Nebraska State Journal, Nov. 23, 1897).

Nov. 2. O'Day and Punteney are caught near False Bottom Creek. Meanwhile, Logan and Sundance supposedly steal a horse near a saw mill by Crow Creek. Sundance may have joined Butch in New Mexico if he did not work at Kelsey’s ranch after the breakout.

According to Charles Kelly, the escaping robbers holed up in Wyoming for the Winter, stealing a total of 45 horses from Gillette and the Northern Cattle Co. near Perry. In mid-November, a posse located the robbers in the Bearpaw mountains, and forced them into a foot escape, recapturing the horses. Between then and December 1, they robbed two post offices as they continued on for Hole in the Wall.

Pearl Baker, however, has Sundance and Logan reuniting with "Flatnose" at Robbers Roost, then heading to Elko to break horses for the Winter before the Club Saloon robbery the following year.

Punteney and O’Day were eventually tried and found not guilty of the Belle Fourche robbery for lack of evidence. (Punteney had two cowboys testify he was ranching with them during the robbery--the same sort of alibi some propose for Sundance.)
  Nov. 8. A starving and exhausted "Frank Jones" (Sundance) is reported captured near Devil's Tower. (Bismarck Tribune, Nov. 9, 1897, Eau Claire Leader, Nov. 9, 1897.) There is no follow-up to this odd report. Either someone was misidentified, or if it was Sundance, he managed an escape. 
Nov. 5 (approx.). Harvey Ray (Harvey Logan) and "Flatnose" Currie are reportedly seen near the Bar C ranch, and are suspected as being hidden there by friends. (Wyoming Derrick, Nov. 11, 1897.)    
  Nov. 16. Deadwood liveryman, Hanford Brown, claimed he saw the escaped Deadwood bandits in flight, and that during the night they stole his wagon horse from his barn near the Devil's Tower area. (Nebraska State Journal, Nov. 17, 1897.)  
Nov. 30. Sheriff Butts and the prosecutor resign because county commissioners will not cover their out-of-pocket costs in the hunt/prosecution for the Belle Fourche robbers.    
December. Butch's brother Dan pardoned by President McKinley for robbing mail from a stagecoach.    
Dec. 9. Will Carver, the Ketchum brothers, and Ed Cullen attempt to rob a Southern Pacific train at Stein’s Pass, NM., but are driven off   Ed Cullen was shot and killed
Dec. 15. The posse hunting the Belle Fourche robbers engages in a pitched battle with several dozen entrenched outlaws in Hole in the Wall, retiring after two of their company are wounded, and returning to Casper.    

Dec. 18. Sundance (Harry Alonzo) reportedly visits several old friends: McIntosh, Gillespie, and the Magor sisters.

   

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1898

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

  According to an anecdotal claim, Sundance spent some time around Grand Junction in early 1898 because he had relatives and friends there. This is important because it may play into a possible event involving Etta and Sundance with "Gunplay" Maxwell in Springville when a beautiful 22 or 23 year-old woman comes down from Grand Junction.

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I have traced a man under the name of Ackley (the name the Springville woman used) to a very expensive hotel in Grand Junction. (As you get to the Springville incident, you will find that the woman I believe was Etta appeared to be very well off and would have stayed in such a hotel. She dressed in expensive clothes and jewelry, suggesting she had access to a lot of money, while her "husband," conversely, appeared to be a cowboy/rancher/miner of modest means with only a wagon or bicycle to his name.) While his wife was not listed with him, this was the only Ackley in Grand Junction, and coincidentally a woman in 1904, at the start of the World's Fair, checked into a California hotel with a husband having the same first and middle initial as the man in Grand Junction.

  January. Harvey Logan claimed to have visited France in this period.  
January. A Cowboy acquainted with Harvey Ray (Harvey Logan), claimed to have seen him near Hole in the Wall. (Wyoming Derrick, Feb. 24, 1898.)    
February. Harvey Ray (Harvey Logan) and 20 rustlers, including some from the Powder Springs gang, run a big winter cattle drive past Casper toward Hole in the Wall.    
  Week of February 1. Butch Cassidy and members of the Wild Bunch are accused of rustling, trying to rob a saloon, and raucous behavior near Mountain Ranch/Huntington, Ut.

ROBBERS ROOST HEARD FROM

Cassady's Gang Said to Have Stolen Several Horses.

Mountain Ranch, Utah Feb 10th. The Robbers Roost gang, consisting of Butch Cassady and six others who have been rusticating at Huntington for a few days passed south last week robbing G F Olsen's sheep camp of supplies, pack outfit, and it is rumored, six or eight head of horses also. They were headed east and crossed the river at Dandy crossing. While at Huntington they held up a saloonkeeper but got nothing as his wife, hearing that the Roost outfit were headed for Huntington. notified her husband to send all his small change away which he did. They also furnished entertainment for themselves by making a prominent citizen dance the two-step and other fancy dances all the while encouraging him with shots from their six-shooters.

--The Salt Lake Herald, Feb. 16, 1898.

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This behavior seems a bit over the top for Butch, but coincidentally places him in the same county as Castle Gate, which reportedly received word a month later that he planned a second robbery. The stolen horses were probably going to be used for a relay team.

Feb. 17. Pat Johnson shoots and kills young Willie Strang on Valentine Hoy's ranch, and Flees to Powder Springs with Jack Bennett, hooking up with Harry Tracy and Dave Lant.  

This will precipitate the great manhunt remembered ever after in Brown's Park, with Hoy being shot, and the relatively innocent Bennett winding up lynched at the Bassett ranch. The other three would survive for incarceration, though Tracy would later escape jail and leave behind a long list of murder victims before being cornered and committing suicide. As Charles Kelly pointed out, the West would have been much better off had Tracy been lynched on the spot!

  Feb. 20. Logan and Carver (or Ben Kilpatrick) possibly rob a bank at Clifton, Az. Netted $12,000. Logan, planning an escape route by making a 12’ jump into a gulch, had to pull the job alone because his partner was too heavy to make the jump, and instead waited with relay horses 10 miles out of town.
Feb. 28. Lonie Logan gets into a shooting with "Shorty" Parker in Chinook, Mt.  

A SHOOTING SCRAPE

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Little hope entertained for the Recovery of Parker.

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Great Falls. March 6--The following detailed account of the fight between Lonnie Curry and "Shorty" Parker is taken from the Chinook Opinion. A brief story has been given in the Standard of Thursday:

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Lonnie Curry and W. W. Lamkin were in Chinook last Monday. From the former particulars of the last shooting affray in the mountain district were learned. Curry was returning to Landusky last Saturday on the stage and stopped in Charles Perry's store at St. Paul's mission. While there, he went in behind the counter to get a match and Shorty Parker opened the door and had him covered with a revolver when he turned around. He dropped behind the counter and crept to the end of the same. When he jumped out Parker shot simultaneously with him. Parker received Curry's shot in the arm near the elbow, but his aim was not so good and the smoke from his gun blackened Curry's hat. A couple more shots were exchanged without damage before Curry ran in and used his gun as a club. Curry came back to Harlem and from there to Chinook, as he heard the sheriff was at this place, and reported the affair to Sheriff Clary.

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Parker is reported to be in a dangerous condition and but small hopes are entertained for his recovery.

--The Anaconda Standard, March 7, 1898.

  Late Feb. "Harvey Ray" (Harvey Logan), and possibly Sundance (called "one of the Smiths") said to have been recognized amongst a group of heavily armed Powder Springs rustlers driving large herds of cattle toward Hole in the Wall 15-20 miles from Casper. (Newcastle News-Journal March 4, 1898.)  
March. Members of the Wild Bunch were seen hanging around Price and Helper, Ut. An informant (said by some to be Butch Cassidy himself, who feared Army retribution) let it be known a plan was in place to ambush 20 soldiers in Gate canyon, and steal Indian annuities and an Army payroll of $30,000.   An additional force of Buffalo Soldiers was added to the unit, and the attack was called off by the gang.
March 12. Two members of the Wild Bunch rob a sheep camp by the Flat Tops.  

ROBBERS ROOST RAID

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Sheep Camp Looted By the San Rafael Outlaws.

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THE HERDER WAS HELD UP.

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FOURTH OUTRAGE THAT HAS OCCURRED RECENTLY.

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Roosters Robbed Men Who Had Entertained Them and Took Everything In Sight.

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From The Herald's Correspondents. Orangeville. Emery county, Utah. March 12th S. M. Galloway of Manti who has charge of the large sheep herd of J. G. Crawford of Manti has just come in from the desert east of here and relates a thrilling story of the Robbers Roost gang. One evening a few days since on returning to camp, he found two men who were making themselves at home and hailed him in a friendly manner, saying they had taken possession as they were too hungry to wait. Mr. Galloway and his herder Carl Sorensen of Ephraim entertained the visitors that night, providing them with beds. During the evening various subjects were discussed, including the Robbers Roost gang. Next day, the strangers rode off and the herders moved their camp to the Flat Tops, Galloway going to Hanksville and leaving Sorensen in charge. As the latter was coming into camp in the evening after rounding up the sheep, he found his guests of the night before had again taken possession. "Hello you here?" he exclaimed. "Yes," one responded, and at that leveled a gun on him ordered him to get off his horse and stand there. The men then proceeded to loot the camp, taking two pack outfits all the groceries, tobacco, and apparatus, two groceries, 50 pounds of flour, what oats they could find room for, and a mutton, and went their way. leaving the herder a few pounds of flour and a fry of meat. This is the third or fourth outrage of this kind that has been perpetrated by the Robbers Roost gang during the past few months and still the outlaws go unpunished.

--The Salt Lake Herald., March 14, 1898.

March 14. Butch Cassidy's plans to rob a saloon in Castle Gate are discovered, and the job is called off.  

ROBBERS SCARED OFF

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Butch Cassady Contemplated a raid on Castle Gate.

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Price Advocate: A little shrewdness on the part of Sheriff Allred in all probability prevented a holdup late last week.

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Some ten or 12 days ago it was intimated to Sheriff Allred by a certain party who is supposed to be in close relations with Butch Cassady's gang that a holdup at Frank Caffey's saloon at Castle Gate where the miners' checks are cashed and the Price stores, was contemplated about pay day. The sheriff investigated and became convinced that plans were prepared and the necessary arrangements made. Mr. Allred notified all concerned to be in readiness to give the robbers a warm reception but somebody was indiscreet and the gang got word of the preparations for their reception and thought it best to let the job out. It was learned that Butch Cassady, Joe Walker and Leigh [Lay] were to make the raid for the money. It is a well known fact that Joe Walker had been in this vicinity for several days and it is probable contemplating the raid and laying plans for the escape of the gang. It  is also very probable that Cassady and Leigh were not many miles from Price. In fact it is thought they could have been reached in a few minutes ride. The greatest difficulty encountered by the officers in their endeavors to get these wily outlaws is the friends of the outlaws who keep them posted as to any move the officers may have planned. It is possible that an example will be made of some of the parties who befriend the outlaws. Sheriff Allred has purchased five modern rifles for use in case he wishes to at any time hurriedly get a posse together. They are all modern make and will do effective work at very long range.

--The Salt Lake Herald, March 26, 1898.

March 14. The governors from Utah, Colorado and Wyoming meet in Salt Lake City to strategize on how to wipe out the outlaws. Eventually they announce a plan to use bounty hunters.  

GALL OF ROBBERS ROOSTERS.

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Sent Their Complaints to the Governors In This City.

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Denver News. Governor Adams returned yesterday from a five days trip to Utah. He went there for the purpose of conferring with Governor Wells of Utah and Governor Richards of Wyoming on methods for exterminating the Robbers Roost gang of bandits.

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We took no steps towards any plan to drive out the gang said Governor Adams yesterday. We found that whatever ideas and plans we had were thwarted by publicity. In fact while we were in conference we received a message from the bandits themselves which took the effect of thanks at letting them know we were considering their case. In other words, they intimated they were ready for us and we could not surprise them.

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The governor explained that the message had been brought in by a Salt Lake City man who had seen a member of the gang.

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Governor Adams also said that the meeting of the three governors had been more in the nature of a conference to exchange ideas for future action than it was to form plans to put in force at once.

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We decided, said he, to allow the county officers to cope with the outlaws to the extent of their ability and if they need aid to furnish it to them. In case of another atrocity. each one of the governors will be able to proceed knowing exactly the attitude of the others. This was not the case before. We have now met and full understand the situation. Governor Adams said that it was the opinion of the conference that should five or six of the bandits be captured, the whole gang would be broken up.

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The capture of Lant, Tracy and Johnson has served in a measure to quiet the fears of the executives.

--The Salt Lake Herald, March 20, 1898.

March 16. Walt Punteney and Tom O'Day are given a change of venue in their trials to Deadwood, SD.

The Ballard Bros. store and customers in Thompson Springs, Ut., is robbed by two members of the Wild Bunch. Proprietor H. G Ballard knew the robbers and followed them up into the mountains the next day and was subsequently robbed by them again. He refused to identify them to authorities. (The Salt Lake Tribune, March 19, 1898.)

   
March 25. Walt Punteney and Tom O'Day found not guilty on the last of the charges related to the Belle Fourche robbery.    
March 28. Butch Cassidy is spotted near Vernal.   Sheriff Preece reported that Butch had been spending time with a woman there of "questionable repute."
  Spring. According to the Pinkerton theory, Sundance leaves the Kelsey ranch in the Little Snake river valley and joins Harvey Logan and "Flatnose" Currie in Brown's Park.    
  April 5. Logan and Sundance, together with Joe Walker and Bill Moore, may have robbed a prospector in Utah.

ROBBERS ROOST RAID.

Five outlaws procure $1500 in gold dust.

HELD UP A PROSPECTOR

HAS BEEN MINING ON THE RESERVATION

Utes Drove Him Off and He Then Fell Into the Hands of the Outlaws--Two of Them Were the Belle Fourche Bank Robbers--Lots of Gold.

Special to The Herald. Price, Utah. Boney Hiles an old Colorado prospector who has been prospecting on White river on the Uncompahgre reservation came into Lower Crossing yesterday having been run off the reserve by the Indians.

Hiles reports that when about 20 miles north from Lower Crossing he was met by a gang of five outlaws from the Robbers Roost country who were headed north and who covered him with their guns and robbed him of some $1500 in gold dust and in greenbacks. Hiles has been panning gold on White river for some time past and sought to keep secret the place of his whereabouts while accumulating large quantities of gold from the placers of that stream but his surprise by the holdups caused him to divulge the facts to the officers to whom he reported. From description given by Hiles, the outlaws were none other than Frank and Thomas Jones, bank robbers escaped from the Deadwood Dakota jail who held up the Belle Fourche bank last August and a negro named Bill Moore who escaped at the same time and who was charged with murder. From the descriptions given it is also thought that Joe Walker was with the gang of outlaws. These outlaws have been known to have been in the Roost region since last November and it is learned that they have taken their departure upon learning of a raid being planned upon them by Marshal Ireland and Joe Bush whose previous raids in that region have given the outlaws cause for serious alarm.

Mr. Hiles reports large numbers of prospectors going into the reservation from Wyoming and Colorado and a large amount of gold being found in the gravel on White river.

--The Salt Lake Herald, April 6, 1898.

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The movements of Sundance and Logan after breaking jail in Deadwood are not known with certainty. Some think they made it to Hole-in-the-Wall and waited out the Winter there. The Pinkertons thought Sundance wound up at the Kelsey ranch. In either event, they are believed to have returned to Brown's Park in the Spring, giving them opportunity to have committed this robbery. However, tying Moore to them for so long cannot be shown with any certainty. Smokov has him leaving after the breakout and stealing two horses, after which he has no further mention of him. The other four stay together for a brief period, then Sundance and Logan steal a horse and head toward Wyoming. (They may or may not have linked up with Moore again, but the fact Moore steals two horses could imply he was stealing with aiding the other outlaws in mind, and would not preclude some prearranged agreement for everyone to split up and rendezvous somewhere with any supplies/mounts they'd managed to acquire, since Logan and Sundance did split up from Punteney and O'Day in addition to splitting up from Moore as well.)

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Since Walker was killed in the Price area a month after this event, it is also possible this robbery was committed only by he and associates of his, including an unknown black man. But we cannot absolutely exclude Logan and Sundance from this event.

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As we will see in the April 8 note, at least one of the men had a letter from Jack Moore, rustler and foreman of the 3B ranch and friend of Butch and the Wild Bunch, proving that some members of the Wild Bunch did commit this robbery, one of whom may have been named Charlie Green.

April 8. "Boney" Hiles reports he has a letter by one of the robbers dealing with Butch Cassidy, and identifying the writer as Jack Moore.  

ROBBERS SCARED OUT BY IRELAND AND BUSH

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Interesting Letter Written By One of the Outlaws Last September.

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Had Planned a Big Raid.

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Special to The Herald. Price Utah April 8 "Boney" Hiles , the prospector who was robbed by supposed members of the Robbers Roost Gang on the 5th inst. and who went to Denver on Wednesday last has just written a letter to an old friend in Price inclosing a letter which he found inside a hatband of an old hat which one of the outlaws exchanged for the hat worn by him. The letter is dated Hanksville and is thought to be from the notorious thief Jack Moore and contains a tip to a fellow outlaw located in Baggs Wyo. warning him of certain movements on the part of the officers and also contains an allusion to some big robbery under consideration by the outlaws.

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From the letter it is apparent that the Robbers Roost Gang is a thoroughly organized band of thieves and that allies are located throughout the field of their operations. The letter is as follows.

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Hanksville. Sept 12 Charlie Green, Baggs, Wyo. Charlie Maxwell, Cassidy and Walker left headquarters two days ago and will be at Kennedys ranch about the 20th. It aint safe to take chances on the big deal. This country is full of officers. A fellow named Ireland has got a big gang out and another killer named Joe Bush has been rooting round. Don't stop in Price when you come down.

"JACK"

--The Salt Lake Herald, April 9, 1898.

April 11. Will Carver and the Ketchums indicted for the Folsom robbery.    
  Mid-Late April? Joe Walker and a partner may have robbed a store in Green River (Vernal Express, May 19, 1898.)  
April 23. Lonie Logan and Jim Thornhill file for water rights on Warm Springs Creek.    
April 28. The Ketchum gang, possibly with Will Carver or Ed Kilpatrick, robs the Galveston, Harrisburg, & San Antonio #20 near Comstock, Tx.   The take is unknown, but is estimated from at up to $20,000.
May 6. Joe Walker and Johnny Herring accost Billy McGuire and a young son of George Whitmore after they are followed into a canyon. They then sent the boy out and beat McGuire with a gun belt, taking their horses and gear, forcing both to walk to town.   After they arrived, a posse, determined to hunt Walker and Herring down, did exactly that.
May 13. Joe Walker killed.   A posse, consisting of Sheriff C. W. Allred, Pete Anderson, J.W. Warf, J. B. Whitmore, George Whitmore, Jack Gentry, Jim Inglefield, Billy McGuire and Jack Watson, mistakenly thinking they had discovered the camp of Butch and Sundance at Moon Water creek, shoot and kill Walker and friend Johnny Herring, and capture two men named Thompson and Shultz, who were later found not guilty of rustling.

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Owing to the many queries that have come to me in regards to the capture and killing of Joe Walker and Butch Cassidy, I have been induced to write a short account of that experience. As far as I know, I am the only man living that witnessed the scene.

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In May, 1898, Sheriff Allred called on me to go with him after Joe Walker, who had been rustling Whitmore's cattle. W.M. McGuire had followed Walker to the box canyon on Price river below Woodside, not knowing just who he was following. Walker ambushed him, and a young Whitmore lad who was with McGuire, sent the boy back, then took Bill's cartridge belt and beat him over the head with it, after which he took the horse and saddle and ordered Bill back up the canyon.

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Blindly, McGuire started out for Woodside, reaching there exhausted at ten a.m. the next day. In the meantime, Walker and his pal left the stolen cattle, backtracked a few miles, and took another trail to Range valley. Sheriff Allred had completed his posse about two p.m. that day for Woodside, where we met McGuire.

We went on to Box canyon, picked up the outlaw's trail and followed it to the Range Valley cabin, where we met some of the ranch hands and inquired about Walker, but got no satisfaction from them. After scouting, we picked up the trail again, headed north to Green River, and met James McPherson, a rancher. The sheriff asked him where Walker was. He said, "Across Green River." The sheriff said, "We'll take you back with us."

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We traveled up the river across from McPherson's ranch, where he had left his boat. He ferried our camp over and we swam the horses across. After eating lunch at his place, we waited until five p.m., then took the trail up Florence Creek in the night, arriving on the summit at day break, when McPherson told Sheriff Allred to get his fighting men in front, that he was not going further. "They are right down there," he pointed in a northeast direction.

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We didn't go far until I saw a horse and saddle. The sheriff called to Joe and told him to surrender. "We have come to take you dead or alive. You had better surrender."

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Our first and only answer was a gunshot. The bullet struck the ground between mine and the sheriff's feet. We did not see anyone shooting, but saw the gunsmoke and began firing at that spot, stepping up closer with each, until we were within twenty-five yards of their bed.

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Walker had apparently rolled from his bed. He now raised up and ran down the mountain about 300 yards and was shot there. Cassidy, so called, was shot as he jumped up and began to run. Thompson and Schultz, who were with them, put up their hands in surrender. We were lucky that they had left their Winchesters by a big rock, and when they had emptied their six shooters at us they had no protection.

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We found a sort of table for their frying pan, bacon and groceries. The campfire was by the rock also. While shooting, we noticed the frying pan, their dutch oven, canned beans and coffee pot leaping into the air. Later we found them perforated with bullet holes.

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When the excitement had calmed, we tied the dead men on horses and started for Thompson Springs on the D. & R. G. W. R. R. Sheriff Allred, Whitmore, Joe Bush, and McGuire took the train and the dead men to Price. The remaining posse took care of the prisoners and the band of horses.

No living person claimed the animals, except two that belonged to Whitemore. The live men said they all belonged to the dead men. We took Thompson and Shultz to Castle Dale, where they were tried, but freed upon lack of accusing evidence.

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--Account by Pete Anderson from The Sun Advocate, Oct .9, 1941.

  May 16. Butch, hiding under a haystack in a wagon, watches his own funeral in Price, Ut., as Johnny Herring is buried as Butch. Some think this story is mere legend.
May 18 (approx.). A strange incident that may set the stage for the first known sighting of Etta Place occurs when two men arrive in Springville, Ut., from Colorado by wagon. One of them, a "big fellow," will initially be identified by a beautiful young woman as her husband, while she will assert that two others that eventually form the group of three are relatives. A day later, a third "under-sized" friend, will ride into town on a bicycle, and join them. The group will probably case the bank and area, and then depart town for Eureka after a few days.   The "under-sized, slightly built man" on the bicycle brings news that that members of the Robbers Roost (Wild Bunch) gang had recently made some sort of raid in Price to avenge the deaths of Joe Walker and Butch Cassidy (at that time thought killed). It may be his friends felt the man's loose tongue risked alerting local marshals that the group may have had ties to the Robbers Roost gang, and could have precipitated their leaving the area.

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I have had a hard time pinning down what "raid" the man was referring to, but the Deseret Evening News on May 25 carried an article on George Whitmore--an obvious target for retribution--and says he and a posse fought some rustlers, and retrieved some stolen Whitmore horses. No date is given for this event, but it is within the general timeframe of the "under-sized, slightly built man's" claim, and may be the "raid" spoken of. Some think this report may be referring to Joe Walker's death, but there are some major inconsistencies, among them Whitmore's claiming he went out alone in search of rustlers and joined a posse in the field when in Walker's case he started out in Price with an organized posse.

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The man on the bicycle will later play an important part in an encounter with a mysterious beautiful woman on May 28 who may have been Etta Place.

May 28. "Gunplay" Maxwell and William Pearson rob the bank in Springville, Ut., of $3000. They attempted an escape in a buggy but were quickly overtaken. In the shootout that followed, Pearson was shot and Maxwell went to jail, but was released in 1903.   Shortly before the robbery, Maxwell and Pearson stayed at the Meldrum ranch, claiming to work for a sheep ranch, and that they were awaiting word from their boss. The papers believed there were up to five other associates involved with the robbery, which generally seems to tally with the three strangers who showed up a few days earlier (Deseret News, June 4, 1898).

Two men (part of Etta's three-man entourage, presumably) were waiting with horses at Maple Creek canyon, a mile from Hobble Creek canyon, where Maxwell's flight ended (Salt Lake City Herald, May 31, 1898).

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Charles Kelly indicates Maxwell admitted he was expecting support from confederates at Provo who were late in arriving (presumably the men who had arrived a few days earlier in the wagon and on the bike).

May 28. A beautiful Colorado woman, described as 22 or 23 years old, dressed nicely and wearing a "great deal" of jewelry, arrives by train in Springville from Grand Junction shortly after "Gunplay" Maxwell robs the bank, and checks into the 3-story Hotel Harrison under the name of Florence Ackley. She hears about the robbery and starts asking questions. Upon learning one of the robbers was killed and the other captured, she panics and desperately tries to get a look at the dead man and the man who was captured. This arouses the interest of local authorities, and she is placed in the custody of two deputy marshals. She claims she is married to one of the men who had come to town a few days earlier in a wagon, described as a "big fellow." (Sundance was very tall for the time.) The next day, an "under-sized" man rides into town on the bicycle, tracks her down, and claims to be her husband. She then denied claiming the "big fellow" was her spouse, and said the "under-sized" man was actually whom she was married to, and with nothing to hold her or the "under-sized" man on, the "very striking" woman and her "husband" were allowed to leave under the watch of suspicious lawmen. They boarded the train for Eureka, Ut., and were not seen again.   The description of this woman is dead on for Etta Place. Twice the woman's beauty was mentioned in a report, along with her nice clothing and jewelry. Historically, no other woman ever mentioned in the same breath with any tertiary association with the Wild Bunch fit this sort of description but Etta Place. While we will never know just who "Flora [Florence] Ackley" was, this must be treated as a strong candidate for an Etta Place sighting, and I'm satisfied that it was.

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As an interesting coincidence, one legend about Etta Place is that she had a daughter after Sundance abandoned her whom she named Florence!

..

My timeline theoretically allows Sundance to have been in Utah in late May when this happened as he next turns up robbing a train in Nevada in mid July after briefly visiting a cousin there.

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The question may arise as to whether the other two men involved with this were the same men who later rob the train with Sundance in July--"Flatnose" and Logan. Sundance and Logan were always thick as thieves, so if Sundance is in this group (which I must presume if the woman is Etta Place), I would expect Logan to be in it too, but this is doesn't have to be the case. Interestingly, Logan was described at Wilcox by one witness as, "Short, nearly under-sized," making it possible that he was the "under-sized" man who came to claim her. Lew McCarty, who was just over five feet tall, could be another possibility.

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One mystery is why the town of Eureka keeps playing a role in this incident. It was a mining town with no apparent interest to anyone who wasn't a miner--certainly no place any outlaw would typically find himself in unless he were lying low there.

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"Flatnose" supposedly worked in an Arizona copper mine once, and it may be he was working there, and the group were going there to link up with him. Otherwise, rail lines ran northwest into Nevada, where Sundance and Logan are next seen robbing a train, as noted, and perhaps they were simply leaving Utah.

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Where the woman, whoever she was, goes from this point is lost to history. However, I have traced her to the expensive hotel where she was staying in Grand Junction before coming down, where her husband was listed by his initials. A woman using that husband's name coincidentally checked into a California hotel at the same time Sundance and Etta could have arrived from South America on their way to the World's Fair.

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Floremce/Etta probably looked very much like the illustration below in 1898, which is how the well-drerssed young lady of the time presented herself.

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May 28-June 30, the local newspaper reports Lonie was in Harlem, Mt..    
Summer. Lonie Logan is partners in the Club Saloon at Harlem, Mt., with Bill Hart.    
July 1. The Ketchum gang, again with possibly Will Carver or Ed Kilpatrick, robs the Texas Pacific #4 near Stanton, Tx.   The take is unknown, but is estimated from $1000 to $50,000.
July 14. Sundance, Harvey Logan and "Flatnose" Currie rob the Southern Pacific #1 near Humboldt, Nv.   Netted jewelry and $450 in cash. Two of the robbers were already riding the train and forced the engineer at gunpoint to halt it, while the third held the horses.

\..

Logan, possibly due to a dark complexion, may have been called a "Negro" by a witness.

July 20. Daughter Della Rae born to Lonie and girlfriend Elfie Landusky.    
  July 22. Some bicyclists on the outskirts of Park City claimed Butch rode his horse alongside them, and eventually introduced himself, then told them let local officials know he was in town. (The Salt Lake Tribune, July 24, 1898.)  
  Summer. Butch, taking a message to someone for a friend, gets apprehended in a Ryegrass, Wy., saloon by a Deputy Morgan from Sheridan, but on the trail is able to grab the Deputy’s gun and escape. This story may have been concocted by Bill Phillips from his own experience.
July 30. Two fake guns are found in "Gunplay" Maxwell's cell. c He was famous for making fake guns in escape attempts, and even managed to make what would have been a working gun, although it was found before he could use it.
Aug. 1. Butch spends time at the Bower ranch near Castle Gate, on his way to Robbers Roost, and jokes with friends about his supposed demise.   Thompson and Schultz, the two men captured at the time Joe Walker was shot, were working at the Bower ranch at the time of Butch's visit.
Aug. 27. Harvey Logan and two others (probably Sundance and "Flatnose", or else Lonie in place of one of them) rob Daniel Budd’s General Store and Post Office at Big Piney, Wy. A day later, they exchange shots with a posse. Eventually abandoning their horses to escape, they subsequently rustle 15 horses from the Northern Cattle Co.    The robbery netted them $200, some equipment, and some camel hair underwear taken by Logan.
Sep. 3. Lonie sells a tract of land for $2000 to an Alice Doores.    
Last week of October. A posse under Deputy Sheriff Ricks and stock detective W. D. Smith tracks down "Flatnose" Currie and two others with a string of stolen horses and has a shootout with them, but the outlaws escape into Canada.  

 COULDN'T FIND 'EM HERE.

A Wyoming Officer's Pursuit After cattle Rustlers.

NOTORIOUS CURRIE GANG.

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A posse ran onto the desperadoes in the Bad Lands of the Bear Paw Mountains and a battle ensued, but the gang escaped.Deputy Sheriff Ricks of Sundance, Wyo., who has spent considerable time in Montana this fall in an official capacity, has returned to his Wyoming home. Mr. Ricks' mission in this state was to search for members of the notorious Curry gang of stock rustlers, composed of George Currie and the Dixon brothers, all said to be members of the Hole-in-the-Wall band of outlaws who have kept this state, Wyoming and South Dakota peace officers in hot water for several years.

..

One of the recent depredations charged against Currie and his companions is the theft of 30 horses from Mr. Preston, a horse grower of Gillette. The band of horses was evidently too large to run out of the country and after taking them towards the Montana line for some distance the whole herd was abandoned and recaptured by the owner. Subsequently Currie took 15 head of horses from the pastures of the Northern Cattle company and reached Montana with them, crossing the Yellowstone river at Terry.

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Deputy Ricks made up a posse composed of Stock Detective W. D. Smith, Chief of Police Jackson of Terry, Mr. Preston and two of his employees and started on the trail of the thieves. The outlaws did some hard riding, the posse finding a dead hose on the trail, which had been ridden to death. After a chase of 15 days the posse ran onto the desperadoes in the bad lands of the Bear Paw mountains. The fugitives had selected a position commanding the road and fired at the posse with rifles at long range. The posse returned the fire, about 15 shots being exchanged. The desperadoes found the firing too close and fled. leaving their entire camp outfit, consisting of several guns, wearing apparel, grub, etc. Twelve head of the stolen horses were recovered. The trail was again taken up, but was lost in the bad lands.

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The posse traveled in all 300 miles in pursuit of the outlaws. It is believed by the officers that Currie and the Dixons will now go into the British possessions. They have been hunted during the past three months from Uinta county, Wyoming, where they robbed a store at Big Piney, across Wyoming and Montana. and officers throughout both states and south Dakota are on the lookout for them. --The Anaconda Standard, Nov. 18, 1898.

November. Ben Kilpatrick charged with stealing a horse from the Molloy ranch near Eden, Tx.  

 

Fall-Winter. Butch, with Elza Lay (using the names Jim Lowe and William McGinnis), head to New Mexico and work at the Erie Cattle Co. Soon they leave and Butch becomes Asst. Foreman and Trail Boss at the WS ranch. Sundance may also have worked at the WS, though Donna Ernst has him at the Beeler ranch in Wyoming during this period. ..

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1899

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

Winter. In a letter to his family, "Flatnose" claimed to be working in an Arizona copper mine. (Cheyenne Daily Leader, Aug. 7, 1900.)    
January. Harvey Logan was living in Kansas City, according to cousin Bob Lee in a May, 1900, prison interview    
February. Butch is foreman at the WS ranch.    
March. Sundance, Logan and "Flatnose" unite at Brown’s Park and then return to Nevada.    
March 5. The Battle of Roost Canyon.   This is the only battle to ever take place in Robbers Roost, between Jesse Tyler and his posse and Silver Tip Walls, Blue John, and Ed Newcomb, who fought a pitched battle from a cave, on out into the open. The three bandits managed to escape. Blue John is thought to have drowned in the river, while Walls was eventually caught in a cabin at Salt Wash and tried for attempted murder. He was found guilty but later acquitted on appeal.

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ROBBERS ROOST GANG

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Desperate Fight With Sheriff Tyler and Posse

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SMOKELESS POWDER USED

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ONE MAN DEAD ANOTHER MISSING

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Desperadoes Fought at Roost and Then Went to San Rafael River--Are Now Surrounded--Intelligence Anxiously Awaited--Outlaws Stole Horses In Moab.

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All northeastern Utah is excited by the last raid against the Robbers Roost gang and Mr. F. B. Hammond, a well known merchant of Moab, told last night of the present situation.

"The robbers or some of them," he said, "are corralled at present on the San Rafael river and our men under the leadership of Sheriff Tyler had surrounded them at last accounts. Whether they will escape or not is unknown as we have not heard from the 'seat of war for several days.

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"So far, the casualties have been one Indian wounded and one robber disappeared. He is known to have gone into the first fight but was never seen to come out of it, and the chances are that he is dead. A few weeks ago, 'Blue John,' one of the gang, waltzed into Moab at night and departed with the best horses in the town and Andrew Tangreen, a deputy sheriff, started after them. He passed 'Silver Tip,' another of the gang, and an Indian coming into town for food. They learned, as soon as they reached Moab, that Tangreen was out after the horses and that night they struck out to warn their friend 'Blue John.' The next morning Tangreen was on his way back to Moab to get fresh horses and help when he met 'Silver Tip' and the Indian. They slid off their mounts and covered him with their Winchesters in an instant:

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"' Do you want us?' they asked casually.

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"Tangreen looked down the barrels of the rifles and decided that he didn't and rode on to town while the two outlaws rode for life towards the Robbers roost.

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"They rode fast but Tangteen had gotten to town and Sheriff Tyler with Deputes Tangreen, Day' Wilcox, Westwood and the train robber were hot on their trail. The train robber? Oh, I will tell you about him later. The next morning the robbers were surrounded at sunup and the fight begun The Indian had started for the horse and was shot and was dragging himself over a ridge when last seen. Then 'Blue John' came out. He stood on the highest point a fair mark at sixty yards, and with the morning sun blazing behind him raised himself to his full height, raised his rife and shouted: Drift, Drift, you --- --- ---.' The Lord knows how many shots were fired at him, but he finally stepped back below the crest, apparently unhurt. That ended the fight. Our men had to shoot against the sun and the robbers used smokeless powder. All we could see was their bodies and they fired at our smoke and kept themselves well hid. Where they got their arms and smokeless powder no one knows but they have them, which the posse considers a very important fact and one that calls for caution on his part. 'Silver Tip,' 'Blue John,' and two other white men with the Indian were in the first fight. The Indian is known to be wounded and one of the white men never showed up again so the chances are that he is dead.

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"Our men came back after the first fight and then the train robber was arrested He gave his name as Wilson when he volunteered with the posse and was arrested ten minutes after his return for train robbery by a Wells Fargo agent and locked up.

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"The posse stared out again the day after their return and found that the robbers had shifted their quarters and we know that they have been located on the San Rafael river but have heard nothing from them for several days. One thing may be depended upon, however: Sheriff Tyler and his deputies are determined men and if there is any way under heaven to kill or arrest the robbers it will be taken advantage of and they will be brought back dead or alive."

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Mr Hammond is stopping at the Walker ant will be here several days.

--Salt Lake Herald March 27, 1899.

  April 3. Sundance, Logan and "Flatnose" rob the Club Saloon in Elko, Nv. This was claimed by Pearl Baker, but evidence is weak. Three men, masked or wearing hoods, entered the saloon late at night, covered the patrons, and robbed the place of $600-$700, beating proprietor Guthridge after he failed to move fast enough.
April 4. E. M. Guthridge, proprietor of the Club Saloon, swears out a warrant for John Page, J. F. Cook and Bart Holbrook for the robbery. (San Francisco call, April 5, 1899.)   They were arrested the next day, but later released after providing alibis. The club manager then accused three cowboys who'd been hanging around town named Frank Bozeman, Joe Stewart and John Hunter. Apparently, these three men became equated with the ubiquitous Currie gang and dubbed guilty of the robbery. There appears to be no hard evidence the Currie gang was otherwise involved.
Week of April 9. Butch was reportedly seen in Rock Springs for a few hours and departed with several friends (Rawlins Semi-Weekly Republican, April 19, 1899).   Butch reportedly was quoted as saying it was getting hot in Mexico, and he was returning to Hole in the Wall country. (Saratoga Sun, April 27, 1899.)
April 10, Sundance, Logan and "Flatnose" arrive in Kemmerer, Wy., after the Elko robbery.   They purchased a wagon, horses, and other supplies.
April 15. They leave town, heading east.   According to Pearl Baker, they were eventually arrested in Gillette for the Elko robbery and held in jail, but bartender "Whiskey Bill" could not/would not identify them (because the robbers wore hoods), and they were released. They then took a train to Salt Lake City and from there went to Idaho Springs, Wy., where horses were bought for the Wilcox robbery.
Early May. Elza Lay and Bruce “Red” Weaver leave the WS ranch to link up with Will Carver and Sam Ketchum for the train robbery at Folsom, which would result in Lay’s capture and incarceration.

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Butch Cassidy was reportedly in the Vernal area, planning the Wilcox robbery

   
  May 10 (approx.). Butch Cassidy and Elza Lay were reportedly seen in the area 50 miles north of Vernal (The Salt Lake Herald, May 21, 1899). This would generally jibe with other reports of Butch's activities, but Lay was in New Mexico at this time.
Late May. The Wilcox robbers purchase a 30-40 Winchester and 500 rounds of ammo at Kemmerer. At Opal station, they purchase two of the horses used in the robbery, taking special care to select animals with the right physical characteristics for making a long run. (The Salt Lake Tribune, June 18, 1899.)

Lonie Logan leaves his saloon with Bob Lee, ostensibly to go on a "hunting trip" for a month. (Laramie Daily Boomerang, March 10, 1900.)

   
June 1 (approx.) A rancher claims to camp in Robbers Roost and finds it abandoned with no signs of its having been in use for some time.   A correspondent at Price quotes a well known cattleman as follows: "The Robbers Roost gang is a thing of the past in Utah south of the line of the Rio Grande Western railroad with the exception of the half-breed Indian Silver Tip now captured, and Blue John who were at best never more than sheep stealers and never aspired to the dignity of robber of any description." He knows Cassaday and Lay intimately and says they have not been east of the Rio Grande Grande Western railroad since winter before last when they were camped at the Roost for several months and had the road leading into their camp and the trails thereto dynamited against intruders. On a trip through that country less than two weeks ago looking after cattle he stopped at the Roost overnight where he found everything rotted away and only the marks of two years of the elements showing that the place had ever been inhabited. There were five wool mattresses, pieces of bedsteads and cooking utensils in the cabin and canned goods that had never been opened, pipe tobacco and many other articles that had been only partially used. He believes Blue John and the Indian are now well out of the country and into Arizona as this last chase gave them a good scare. In fact, he saw and talked them and they signified an intention of leaving soon for the south The gentleman is firm in his statement that Cassaday and Lay are among the three unknown in the Union Pacific holdup and that the third one is old Tom McCarty.

--The Salt Lake Herald, June 10, 1899.

June 2. Wilcox Train Robbery. Traditionally attributed to Butch Cassidy, the Sundance Kid, Harvey Logan, Lonie Logan, "Flatnose" Currie, Ben Kilpatrick, and Kid Ben Beeson.

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Participants may have included Harvey and Lonie Logan, "Flatnose" Currie, George and Tom Roberts (possibly aliases of Logan and Sundance), and Elza Lay.

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.The only ones we know for certain were there were "Flatnose," Sundance and Logan. However, debate has always raged over whether there were three or six men in the party. Tracks indicated three men. Only the engineer's statements explicitly indicate six men. Other ambiguous statements, including Woodcock's, imply more than three men, while accounts ostensibly derived from the crew's reports report at least five men.

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In 1922, May Gardner wrote a long letter to a Wyoming newspaper about her recollections of old Wyoming, recalling, among other things, being at a ranch when the Wilcox robbers showed up. She claimed to cook dinner for them, later watching them climb a wall to escape as the posse showed up. According to her, there were six robbers, one of which she named as "Lang Thompson," which appears to be a newspaper misprint of Sang Thompson, an early inhabitant of Hole in the Wall. Some corroboration for this could exist in the 1911 book Foreman of the JA6, written by a woman who knew Tom O'Day, and used him as a source of information, even making him a character in the book. She used thinly veiled names for actual people in her book (Harvey Slogan as one example), and in a chapter dealing with the Wilcox robbers, one of six robbers coincidentally is named "Zang."

Netted $8000 and took place at night during a heavy downpour. This is the famous robbery where E. C. Woodcock refused to open up the express car and it was blown up with dynamite. As Express Messenger Smith exited the baggage car, gun in hand, Logan, referring to his lighting-fast ability with a gun, told him, "You son of a bitch--I could shoot you six times before you turned around!" (Cheyenne Daily Leader, May 24, 1900.)

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One of the robbers had a Scottish brogue.

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One big man*, with a Scotch-American brogue, was the only robber who acted violent. He swore a good deal and kicked some of the trainmen when they did not move fast enough. Engineer Jones got a bad lick on the head with a gun.

--Account by mail clerks Bruce and Dietrich, Chicago Inter Ocean June 3 1899.

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* This would correspond to a man identified in the locomotive as in his 50s, and graying. Bob Goodwin points out that Herb Grice--a possible participant--was from England in a region where the accent did sound a bit Scottish.

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The one with the brogue didn't hit the engineer for not moving fast enough, or not cooperating:

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The engineer was compelled by the robbers to uncouple the mail and express cars, and pull ahead and endeavored to do some but the train was so situated that he could not get into position without backing up to take up the slack. Upon reversing the engine, one of the two bandits covering the engineer and fireman mistook the engineer's action for attempting to escape and struck him in the head with a revolver, knocking him against the side of the cab but not stunning him.

--Rawlins Semi Weekly Republican June 3, 1899.

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The robbers weren't fooled by the lie about the train behind being filled with soldiers.

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Jones, the engineer, tried to bluff them by saying that they had the passenger train and that there was four carloads of soldiers in the next section, but was responded to by the bandits that they did not care if there was forty carloads of soldiers.

--Rawlins Semi Weekly Republican June 3, 1899.

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Some robbers were friendly.

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After shooting into the car and got the clerks out, one of them said, "Now, boys, don't get scared. You're just as safe here as you would be in Cheyenne."

--Laramie Daily Boomerang, June 6, 1899.

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Most robbers--but not the one in the locomotive, at least--primarily used rifles as arms.

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The trainmen were all covered with rifles and the robbers took their time.

--Columbus, Neb. Journal, June 7, 1899.

 

One of the clerks asked for a chew of tobacco and was given some by a robber.

--Laramie Daily Boomerang, June 6, 1899.

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The precise number and identity of the robbers is debated. The engineer claimed six, and is usually claimed to be the only one naming that high a number. Others did claim three, but still others certainly claimed more than three robbers:

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Five of the robbers carried away two loads each from the safe and must have secured a large amount of plunder.--account from mail clerk W. G. Bruce in Ogden (probably repeating what he heard from mail clerk Dietrich when both were interviewed together right after the robbery).

--Barbour County Index, June 7, 1899.

Six horses were reportedly observed.

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The robbers put the money and valuables into canvas bags, and returning to the engine, compelled the engineer to run to a point near where six horses were tied.

--New York Sun, June 3, 1899.

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Conductor Storey explicitly telegrammed about six robbers, corroborating engineer Jones' claim.

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A telegram from Conductor Storey received at the Union Pacific headquarters throws some additional light on the occurrence and supplies details that ere missing earlier in the day. Conductor Storey says the robbers flagged down the train with red and white lights and stopped it one and a half miles west of Wilcox. there were six in the gang and four of them got in the engine. The conductor came forward to ascertain what stopped them and one of the four men on the engine covered him with his gun and compelled him to be quiet. The two remaining bandits went for the mail car. They cut off the tourist and special cars and took the remainder of the train a mile further west. There they blew in the side door of the mail car and during the excitement Storey got away and ran back to flag the second section and prevent a collision. Then the robbers tried to blow up the bridge, but without inflicting sufficient damage to cut off pursuit.

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The next move of the gang was to take the mail and express cars to the top of the hill between Aurora and Wilcox, where they blew open the safe. The express matter was damaged, but the bagged escaped with only slight injury. Conductor Storey was unable to estimate the value of the "swag" that was secured.

--Kansas City Journal, June 3, 1899,

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Though regularly claimed he believed there were only three robbers, Joe LeFors actually claimed six:

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There were six men in the Wilcox affair. Lonny Curry was killed at Kansas City, George Curry was killed north of Thompson's, Utah, and Bob Lee was sent to the Wyoming State Penitentiary for a term of ten years. The three remaining members of the gang--the Roberts brothers and one other--are still at large.

--Salt Lake Herald, Sep. 17, 1900.

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Woodcock's verbiage sounds like he was describing a large group, not simply three men:

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"I could have got some* of them with my shotgun, but they had other train boys with them, so I was afraid to shoot. They all had their faces blackened. some* had handkerchiefs over them also."

--C. E. Woodcock quoted in the SF Chronicle June 3, 1899.

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* My emphasis.

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This doesn't sound like a man who only saw three men. If all he saw were three men, I submit he should have spoken in less-generalized, more specific terms because of the small number of people he was dealing with: "Two wore masks, one didn't," etc.

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Thus, all this "some" talk indicates talk indicated he was observing a larger group of men, not three, and was speaking in generalities because of the number of people he was seeing.

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"The first holdup I was in took place in Wilcox, Wyo., in 1899 by several bandits of Butch Cassidy's gang."

--C. E. Woodcock, Ogden Standard Examiner, Aug. 3, 1930.

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Beyond that, in a detailed account just after the robbery, Woodcock is reported to have seen six men, and the Union Pacific even provided descriptions of the six!

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Stories of the hold-up

As told by the Mail Clerk and the Express Messenger

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Not an event of an Enjoyable Nature--Woodcock the Express Messenger Shaken Up--Bruce, the Mail Clerk, and His Experience in Connection with L. L. Deitrich,

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At 10:20 last night the train which was held up at Wilcox, Wyoming, yesterday morning, arrived in Ogden, nearly nine hours late. There were a number of people down to the train to hear the stories of the passengers and train men, but the passengers knew nothing of the matter, and the train men had left the train at Green River.

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The only men who came through with the train were Mail Clerk W. K. Bruce and Express Messenger Ernest Woodcock, and their stories are interesting. The train robbed was the west bound train, due at Ogden at 1:40 yesterday afternoon, and was composed of the Portland mail car, the Ogden mail car, a car of the California mail, and the express car, and two passenger cars loaded.

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The hold-up occurred at a point between the stations of Aurora and Wilcox, and the robbers had selected a spot where they were eight miles from a telegraph station on the west, and ten miles on the other, and just at the foot at a hilly rise on the grade. When the train was stopped, it was just at the foot of the grade and just as it had passed over the bridge just west of Wilcox. The train was stopped at 2:18 AM, and the story of Bruce follows:

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"I had just worked up the mail to where I could lie down for a little sleep, when the train stopped. There was no answering whistle or anything to indicate the cause of the stop, and I was surprised and annoyed. The man had climbed on the engine and had asked the engineer whom was in the mail and express cars. He told them 'Sherman' was in the mail car, and a moment after the train came to a standstill some one called outside the door of the car, 'Sherman, Sherman come out here.' Deitrich was standing near the door and I wanted him to see what the fellow wanted. He opened the door and the fellow says, 'Sherman, come out of there.' I told them Sherman was not there, and they said, 'Come out of there, and damn quick, too.' I says, 'Go to hell,' and slammed the door shut, and then there came a bullet through the side of the car which just missed me. I called to Deitrich to turn the lights out, and then they called out, 'Come out of there or we'll blow you out.' and they laid a stick of dynamite against the door of the car and shattered it. One of the robbers was ordered to get into the car, but he only stuck his gun inside the door and fired a few times. There were four shots fired through the car. One of them passed through the water tank and ricocheted around through the car until it was spent, and here it is," and he showed me a battered 45 bullet. "After the explosion we decided we better get out, and we were received by three of the robbers. Their actions made me think they were amateurs. They told us to stand 'out there,' indicating a spot twenty feet from the track, and then, 'No, up against the car,' and we stood where they told us to stand. When they had got us lined up, they called to the messenger but he came not. They put a stick of dynamite against the car and blew the door out and part of the car also. Woodcock came out looking as if he had been hurt. He had his gun in his hand and they took it away from him and lined him up. Prior to this, however, they had run the train up to where their camp was, having taken two Portland clerks and put them in the passenger coaches, which were uncoupled from the mail and express cars, and at the camp were two more of the gang, making the only men I saw five in number. Here they compelled Deitrich to light the cars, and after he had climbed down out of the express car they laid a bundle of about twenty sticks of dynamite on the safe, and the explosion shattered the car and blew the safe out of all semblance to its original self. They never touched the mail car. The five then took a load apiece from the safe and carried it to their cap, about a hundred yards away from the tracks, and then returned and repeated the operation. This is the only means at guessing at the amount of the booty. Just as quick as I got a chance, I left for the other end of the train and ran down about there quarters of a mile to flag down the second section, but the train men had gone before me. The last I saw of the robbers they were walking over the hills to the north, and headed for Laramie peak."

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The engineer did not move fast enough and they hit him over the head with a gun, making a bad scalp wound. After they had left he took the engine and ran down to Medicine Bow, from where first news of the robbery was sent out. Meanwhile the second section had been standing east of the bridge, which the robbers had tried to blow up after the first section crossed. It remained there until daylight, and then came the work of clearing the track. The bridge was not badly damaged.

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Woodcock's story does not differ from that of Bruce, except that he saw six men instead of five. He is pretty badly used up as a result of the explosion and loss of sleep. The fear of both he and the mail clerks is that the robbers would put dynamite under the cars and burst the gas tanks, which would have meant death for the whole party. He has no idea of the amount of plunder, but says the robbers made two trips each to the safe and to their camp. They told him to get out of the car, but he turned the lights out, and then they blew the door open. The concussion was very great and the side of the car was partly blown in. When they blew the safe open there was only a fifth of one side of the car left standing, and that was cut off. Everything was a complete wreck.

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Bruce was for ten years a cowboy in the Wyoming range, and is well acquainted with the ways of the range men. He does not believe that the gang was the Hole-in-the-Wall gang, or the Robbers Roost gang, or the McCartys, or Butch Cassidy's crowd. He says they acted like amateurs, and they did not act like range men, from whom these gangs have been recruited. As for descriptions he says it was so dark he could not give an accurate description of the man who stood beside him with a gun during all the time they were doing their work.

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DESCRIPTIONS OF THE MEN

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Last night the Union Pacific posted a reward of $1000 for the arrest and conviction of the men who did the holdup, and the following description was furnished by Agent Corse:

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The leader of the party--about 50 years old, 5 feet 7 inches or 5 feet 8 inches high, thin, round nose, light canvas coat, weight about 157 pounds.

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Second man--Dark complexion, black woolly hair, slouch hat, dark suit, about 5 feet 8 inches or 5 feet 9 inches high, weight, 170 pounds.

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Third man--Five feet 8 inches or 5 feet 9 inches high, black hair, weight 160 or 170 pounds, black suit, large shoes or boots.

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Fourth man--Quite small, about 5 feet 6 inches high, dark complexion, gray hat, pants inside his boot, weight 160 pounds.

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Fifth man--Weight about 150 pounds, drooping white cowboy hat, canvas leggings, black leather shoes, brown overalls, corduroy pants, light medium length overcoat; a Texas twang to his voice; had a carbine with a long wooden stock.

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Sixth man--about 5 feet 8 inches or 5 feet 9 inches high, weight 150 pounds, stubby, sandy beard.

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Len Deitrich is well known in Ogden, and was a lieutenant in Torrey's Rough Riders. When the robbers ordered he and the engineer onto the engine he did not move fast enough and one of the robbers gave Len a swift kick and batted the engineer over the head with a gun, making a bad scalp wound which bled profusely. Len is a dapper, polite young man, but he is sore because he says it is the first time a man ever kicked him that he did not kick back.

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The robbers were well supplied with dynamite [and powder from Gus Jensen & Bro., in Saratoga], as they left about 200 pounds near their camp, and there was dynamite all along the track, while there were forty pounds left in the express car. The graders are not far from this point, and it is thought that the robbers stole the dynamite from the grading outfit. Bruce says the he believes the robbers will be found right in one of the grading camps.

--Ogden Standard, June 3, 1898.

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BANDITS HELD THE TRAIN UP

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Bold Robbery of Union Pacific Express In Wyoming,

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DYNAMITE USED TO BLOW OPEN SAFES.

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Make Their Escape and Posses Are After Them.

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Daring Work of Six Men, Believed to be Members of Utah's Famous "Hole in the Wall" Gang--Destroyed a Bridge and Wrecked Cars--Brutal Treatment of Trainmen--The amount Secured Is Not Unknown.

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(Special to The Herald.)

Ogden, June 2. --The Union Pacific train due in Ogden at 1:40 this afternoon did not arrive until 10:10 tonight. This is the train that was looted near Wilcox, Wyo., at an early hour this morning. The mail car showed very plainly the disastrous effects of the dynamite used to blow open its door.

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On this train cam in Ernest Woodcock, the Pacific Express messenger, and W. G. Bruce the mail clerk, the former having had a thrilling experience with the robbers. L. L. Dietrich, the mail clerk who was with Bruce, was ordered back to Cheyenne, and took the eastbound train at Evanston. The trainmen who were on board when the robbery occurred stopped at Green River, but the other trainmen coming in tonight gave considerable information on the robbery.

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The train was the westbound passenger, also carrying mail and express. It was running in two sections, the first section being the one held up. This section consisted of two mail cars, a baggage car filled with overland mail, an express car and two well-filled passenger coaches.

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This section was due at Wilcox at 2:03 a.m., but it was a little late. It had passed Wilcox and was flagged by a red light between Wilcox and Aurora at 2:18. It was at a point 392 miles East of Ogden, or 132 miles west of Cheyenne.

Mail Clerk's Story.

The story of subsequent developments as given by W. G. Bruce, the mail clerk, is as follows:

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"When the train stopped, the engineer and firemen were covered with four or five guns in the hands of the robbers, and the engineer was asked what was the name of the mail clerk. He told them it was Sherman, deceiving them purposely. Some of the robbers then went to the forward mail car and called for Sherman. I told them Sherman was not there. They told me to come out anyway. I and Dietrich declined, and promptly put out the lights.

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"The bandits then fired several shots through the mail car, sending them crosswise, lengthwise, and cornerwise. We still refused to open the door, and the robbers placed some giant powder in the door and exploded it, tearing the door off its hinges. One of the robbers then shoved his pistol through the doorway and fired another shot.

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"They were going to put more dynamite under the car, when we came out. The two clerks in the Portland mail car likewise were ordered out of their car, and were held in custody, together with the other two clerks.

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After Express Messenger.

"The robbers then turned their attention to the express, and ordered Messenger Woodcock out. He made no reply, and had previously put out the lights. A shot was fired through his window, and then the door was blown open by explosives, the force of it carrying away a portion of the side of the car. Woodcock got out and was stood up along with the four mail clerks.

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"Previous to this the train had been uncoupled and the express and mail cars had been run on ahead from the passenger coaches. The robbers then sent two Portland mail clerks back to the passenger coaches, put me and Woodcock on the engine and made the engineer pull the train on up to their camp, about four miles distant, where they proceeded to loot the express car.

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"Dietrich, the other mail clerk, ran past the passenger coaches, to flag the second section of the train to avoid a collision. The other trainmen, however, had run ahead of Dietrich to flag the second section, which, however, did not come on till daylight.

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"Meanwhile, the robbers at the express car piled a lot of giant powder on the safe and exploded it. The concussion demolished the car, blowing off nearly all the upper structure, leaving only a portion of one side above the floor. The safe was split in twain and the contents exposed.

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Carried off plunder.

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"After the explosion, five of the bandits carried a load of plunder from the safe to their camp, and each returned and got another load. This is the only way of forming an estimate of how much booty they secured.

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They went about their work in a leisurely business-like manner, and one man was in absolute charge of the job. He was very polite to the mail clerks and the train crew, and this was the case with all but one of the bandits, a burly fellow, with a Scotch-Irish brogue, who swore profusely, and when any men in custody did not move swiftly enough, he hastened them with his boot.

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Was Afraid to Shoot.

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The story of Messenger Woodcock is practically the same as that above given. He added, however, that he had a good shotgun in the express car and might have gotten one or two of the fellows after they blew open the door, but the trainmen and mail clerks were stationed amongst them, and he was afraid to shoot, and feared also that the robbers would have murdered the trainmen. The bandits took this shotgun, but the pistol which they had taken from him as he got out of the car they tossed back into the car after they had looted the safe. They also left about four pounds of dynamite in the car and about 200 pounds of explosive stuff was found cached. Quantities of giant powder was found at several other places along the track.

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None of the mail was interfered with.

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It was learned, furthermore, that when the robbers heard a report that two carloads of soldiers were on the second section, they exploded some giant powder on the bridge, endeavoring to destroy it, but succeeded only in wrecking the track.

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When the robbers left, they walked leisurely to the hill where their camp was situated.

--Salt Lake City Herald, June 3, 1899.

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At 2:18 this morning, just as we had passed Wilcox, where there is only a sidetrack, being about midway between Rock Creek and Aurora, we were stopped by lanterns. Before the train came to a full stop, the rear brakeman, as required by the rules, jumped off and started back to flag the second section which was following. As soon was we came to a standstill, Conductor Storey went forward to see what was the matter and saw several men with guns, one of whom shouted that they were going to blow up the train with dynamite. The conductor understood the situation at once and before meeting the bandits turned and started back to warn the second section. The robbers mounted the engine and at the point of their guns forced the engineer and fireman to dismount, after beating the engineer over the head with their guns, claiming he didn't move fast enough, and marched them back to our car.

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In the meantime the postal clerks had been working as usual, knowing nothing of what had been going on the outside, think that the stop was made at the Aurora station.

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Before the robbers came to our car I looked out and saw we were not at a station, but as it was not unusual to stop between stations I resumed work, seeing nothing to attract my attention. In a moment Dietrick looked out, saw several men ahead, and remarked that he thought the trainmen were driving off a gang of hobos, and then he went back to work. In a few moments we heard voices outside our car calling for Sherman, and looking out saw Engineer Jones and his fireman accompanied by three masked men with guns. They evidently thought Clerk Sherman was aboard and were calling to him to come out with the crew. Bart Bruce, clerk in charge, refused to open the door, and ordered that all lights be extinguished. There was much loud talk and threats to blow up the car were made, but the doors were kept shut. In about 15 minutes two shots were fired into the car, one of the shots passing through the water tank, and on through the heavy stanchions. The bullet was afterward found, and proved to be of small calibre, such as the government use, and was undoubtedly fired from one of the new Winchester rifles which are made to use the new Kraag-Jorgenson cartridges. Following close upon the shooting came a terrific explosion, and one of the doors was completely wrecked and most of the car windows broken. The bandits then threatened to blow up the whole car if we didn't get out, so Bruce gave the word and we jumped down, and were immediately lined up and searched for weapons. They said it would do us no good to make trouble, that they didn't want the mail--that they wanted what was in the express car and was going to have it, and that they had enough powder to blow the whole train off the track. After searching us they started us back and we saw up the track the headlight of the second section. They asked what it was and were told. Then they asked what was on the train, and somebody said there were two cars of soldiers on the train. This scared them, and they hastened back to the engine, driving us ahead. They forced us on the engine, and as Dietrick moved too slowly, resisted him with a few kicks.

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They then ran the train across a gully, and stopped. There were two extra cars on the train, a tourist sleeper and a private car. These were uncoupled, and while this was being done, others of the gang went to the bridge, attempting to destroy it with giant powder, or dynamite, which they placed on the timbers. After the explosion at the bridge they boarded and with the baggage, express and mail cars, went on for about two miles, leaving the extra cars. At the time we were taken to the engine, there were so many of us, they sent Bruce and me back to join the second section.

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Upon arriving at the stopping place they proceeded to business again and went to the express car and ordered the messenger, E. C. Woodcock, to open. He refused, and the outlaws proceeded to batter down the doors and blew a big hole in the side of the car. The explosion was so terrific that the messenger was stunned and had to be taken from the car. They then proceeded to the other mail car, occupied by clerks O'Brien and Skidmore, and threatened to blow it up but the boys were advised to come out, which they did. The robbers then went after the safes in the express car with dynamite and soon succeeded in getting into them, but not before the car was tore to pieces by the force of the charges. They took everything from the safes and what they didn't carry away they destroyed. After finishing their work, they started in a northerly direction on foot.

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In the meantime the second section had crossed the bridge in safety, which, while not destroyed, was badly damaged. The passenger train then proceeded to the Wilcox sidetrack, where they waited for some time, fearing that the first section might be sent back on the main line. At length they proceeded and coming up on the scene of the holdup, viewed the surroundings and found behind a snow fence, blankets and quilts, as well as two sacks of giant powder, each about 50 pounds in weight.

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The engine in the first section had been sent ahead to Aurora, the nearest telegraph station, from which place the alarm had been sent out. We soon followed, dragging along the damaged express car which knocked against sign boards and switches.

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The men all wore long masks reaching below their necks, and of three that I observed, one looked to be six feet tall, the others being ordinary sized men. The leader appeared to be 50 years old, and spoke with a squeaky voice, pitched very high. They appeared not to want to unnecessarily want to hurt any one and were quite sociable and asked one of the boys for a chew of tobacco, Our train was delayed altogether about two hours.

--Account by Robert Lawson, Wyoming Derrick, June 8, 1899.

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A lack of tracks suggested three robbers (although LeFors was the tracker, and admitted he had a hard time finding the actual tracks from other posses' riding through the area), and that was the number settled on, relegating crew reports to the contrary as mistaken. Reports of the robbers' movements are contradictory, however, and imply two groups of men.

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The train crew seemed to report seeing 6 horses tied nearby.

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The robbers stored the money and valuables in canvas bags, and returning to the engine compelled the engineer to run ahead to a point near where six horses where tied.

--The Washington DC Times, June 3, 1899.

 ..

WARREN McCORD'S STORY

Traveling Agent of Northwestern Road Was on the Train.

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Warren McCord, traveling agent of the Chicago Northwestern with headquarters at Denver, gave a very lucid account of the holdup last night at the Knutsford. He was a passenger in the tourist car of the first section, having been unable to get a berth in the crowded Pullmans which were in the second section.

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"I believe that the only reason the robbers did not come through the sleeping car was because they had been delayed so long in getting at the safe in the express car or because they got enough money from the safe and did not want to take the risk of getting more from the passengers. They had intended to go through the sleeping car for they told Engineer Jones so.

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"'Hurry up and run the engine out.' said one of the gang to him in the cab of the engines, 'for we want to get back to the sleepers.'

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"As it took them more than an hour to do the work and daylight was coming rapidly, it is possible that they thought it better to get away as quickly as they could. It is strange but true that not more than three persons in the tourist car knew of the holdup at the time that it occurred. The robbers had broken the glass door of the vestibule to get at the lever which uncoupled the tourist from the express and mail cars. Then when they had taken the engine with the two mail and the express cars a mile away there was a terrible noise from the explosion of the safe but it didn't awaken the people of the tourist.

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After the robbers had done their work--there were six of them--they made the engineer, fireman, mail clerks and express messenger go up the track about 200 feet, telling them to remain until they were out of sight and they struck off to the north over a low hill. Someone went over and made an investigation while we were waiting. He found a corral made of wire netting in which there had been horses, two new quilts and two sacks of dynamite, a sufficient quantity to blow up all Salt Lake. This stuff had been left behind.

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"The purpose of the robbers in blowing up the trestle west of Wilcox was to keep the second section which they thought was filled with soldiers from coming upon them during their work. But the attempt to destroy the trestle was a failure. Only one tie and a stringer was misplaced. The injury was not sufficient to keep the second section from coming on. Just as soon as our return engine whistled for its back flagman to return.

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"It is evident from their knowledge of trains and cars as shown in their work of uncoupling the tourist from the mail and express cars that they were well prepared. And the fact that they knew a second section was coming and believed it to be filled with soldiers lends additional proof. Engineer Jones said that all of the six men wore masks and that their faces were blackened underneath them, so that identification was practically impossible."

--Salt Lake Herald, June 3, 1899.

 ,

Butch may not have been present, though his attorney was among the passenger, and acted suspiciously.

,

Horses found nearby with some of the loot were (arguably) traced to Tom O'Day, Bob Taylor and Manuel Armenta.

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The men wore masks made from white napkins possibly taken from a restaurant, and used "great profanity" during the robbery.

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In Laramie, Wy., the Union Pacific sent out the #4 train at 7 AM with horses, equipment and possemen to chase the fugitives, but this was not the famed "Super Posse."

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15 miles North of Casper, on Salt Creek Road, the robbers drove off the posse by their first use of smokeless powder.

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Five robbers were supposedly hidden in a cave near the Muddy Creek Road ranch, one of which was identified by ranch-owner Emery Burnaugh, who supplied them, as Butch Cassidy.

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One of the robbers (possibly Harvey Ray) is thought to have been wounded, and later died.

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Shortly after the robbery, there is a claim that three newly-arrived cowboys in Brown's Park cleaned up, donned suits, and left the area in a buckboard, claiming they were cattle buyers. Some believe they were Butch, Sundance and Elza Lay. (According to Ann Bassett, Elza Lay left her a map to where his cut of the gold was hidden.)

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Shortly afterward, Sundance was supposedly seen in a flashy new suit with a pair of pearl-handled Colts, partying in the Roundhouse Saloon at Linwood, Wy., along with Butch, Harvey Logan and Elza Lay. The gang then headed to Brown's Park

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When eventually asked by lawyer William Simpson if he had been in on the robbery, Butch claimed he was in on the escape, but not the actual crime.

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The original plan may have been to rob a Denver and Rio Grande train near Price, Ut., but due to a heavy influx of recent prospectors to the area, the plan may have been changed.

June 4. At 2 in the morning, three of the robbers boldly rode through Casper and crossed the bridge, unmolested.    
June 5. Come dawn, a posse found a Pacific Express Co. shotgun left behind by the robbers. Later, Frank Webb and J. B. Miller were struck by lightning, and injured, (The Salt Lake Herald, June 6, 1899.)

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A posse under Joe Hazen and Oscar Hiestland found the trail of the Wilcox robbers and exchanged shots with them at Pine Bluffs. A stand-off resulted until the robbers rode up a steep hill and escaped during the night. Heistland, his horse shot, had to walk several miles to find another.

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A "James Lowe" checks into the White House hotel in Salt Lake City.

   
June 6. Converse County Sheriff Josiah Hazen shot in an ambush near Teapot Creek by the escaping robbers using smokeless powder.   In a conversation with Sheriff Layne of Ogden on June 17, a Casper deputy sheriff who was on the posse claimed two other men were also shot and killed in the battle along with Hazen. (The Salt Lake City Tribune, July 21, 1899.) However, this is not confirmed by the detailed article below.

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The posse stayed on the trail of the robbers but lost it in the Big Horn Mountains.

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OUR CORRESPONDENT TELLS THE STORY

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The chase after the train robbers and developments up to the hour.

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Telegram received this afternoon how they made their escape

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Special to they Sun-Leader.

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The chase after three men who robbed a Union Pacific train a week ago this morning is still in progress. It has been interesting from the start. After the Sun-leader correspondent left the trail Monday morning to bring in his dispatches, it was followed by the posse for seven miles to Castle creek where Sheriff Hazen was killed.

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At Castle creek the robbers turned their horses loose Monday night and at sun-up Tuesday morning the posse cached there and found the horses, they having strayed some distance. Then the camp of the robbers was found, and between it and their horses the tracks of three men were discovered. Sheriff Hazed said: "Here they are, boys, right in here. Here are their tracks." His remark was answered by a volley from the robbers, who were but a few yards off, and the brave sheriff fell, rose up and ran a short distance and then fell again.

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Detective Wheeling, who was near Hazen, and Frank Webb returned a few shots, but at the affair at the rocks the robbers could not be seen and they use smokeless powder, could not be accurately located.

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After Hazen was shot the men stationed themselves about in the washouts and sage brush, each selecting his own position, and a camp was established several hundred yards distant, A small party went after a wagon, which they luckily secured from some immigrants, and after several hours Mr. Hazen was found and carried across the creek to the wagon by Chas. Mallaby and some other cowboys and brought to town.

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About 9 o'clock Tuesday morning Dr. Leeper and Mr. Gill crawled into the washout from which the robbers had done the shooting, came out and reported them gone. They had crawled through the washouts to the creek which is very crooked, with perpendicular land banks. There was considerable water in the creek and it was muddy from recent rains. For five miles the robbers walked up the creek in the muddy water which, by Tuesday morning, had settled and cleared so that their tracks could be seen. It was believed they had left Monday morning immediately after the shooting and consequently had 24 hours' start.

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The men of the posse were worn out from loss of sleep, hungry and discouraged, and decided to return to Casper. But they soon met a party of reinforcements with supplies, and taking fresh courage, turned again to the north to take up the trail. About four miles, as the bird files, from the place where Hazen was shot the robbers struck an old road running along the top of a high and narrow ridge. During Monday night they followed this road for nearly 15 miles. About daylight they had separated. Two of them [Logan and "Flatnose"] arrived at Nelson Bros.' sheep camp, five miles southwest of French's oil wells, at 5 o'clock Tuesday morning. The larger man of the two ["Flatnose"], who seemed in a happy frame of mind, kindly assisted herder Melia in getting breakfast and also offered him the loan of his gun to kill a mutton, which undoubtedly would have been relished. The shorter, dark complexioned man seemed downcast and had little to say. After breakfast the two men trudged on slowly towards Tisdale's pasture.

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Twenty-four hours later the posse breakfasted in the same vicinity, and your correspondent, who had since leaving Casper Tuesday morning ridden 70 miles without seeing a human being, took breakfast at Lou Scott's sheep camp at French's Wells on Dug Out creek, 20 miles from Kaycee. Here the reporter was overtaken by five men of the posse, and with them went on to Kaycee. It developed that the two robbers had separated probably on Tuesday, and that night reached Powder river by different routes. One had traveled along the French road for miles, his tracks being very plain, even within a mile of Keltonbacks & Young's sheep camps, which are on the south Powder, seven miles from Kaycee. The other had traveled along the old Buffalo-Casper freight road, and probably reached Kaycee about daylight Wednesday morning. He had walked 50 miles since the fight.

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The people in the village had not heard of the robbery until informed by our party. The sheriff of Johnson county had been there alone, leaving Wednesday morning, but the citizens had not known his business.

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At 7 o'clock Wednesday night your correspondent left Kaycee, arriving at Tisdale's, 20 miles south at 11. At Tisdale's United States Marshal Frank Hadsell, ex-United States Marshal John McDermott, Detective Wheeling and 40 men were in camp. They left Thursday morning for Kaycee. They were joined Wednesday night by Joe Laforce, who represents the Montana Stock Association, and Sheriff W. H. Miller of Weston county. These gentlemen had, since the evening before, made a ride of 150 miles, changing horses four times.

Your corresponded arrived here last night at 11 o'clock, having ridden in three days 175 miles.

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Last night Union Pacific detective Tubin and guide left here for the front. They were well supplied with provisions and bedding for the posse. Two of the horses captured from the robbers are old work horses and the third is a race horse, it is thought. Their saddles they must have stolen from some farmer, and one bears the brand of the Denver Manufacturing company. Some gold and silver watches were tied on the saddle.

--Cheyenne Daily Sun-Leader, June 10, 1899.

June 6. Logan and "Flatnose" show up at the Kidd sheep camp, seeking breakfast from John DeVore, Sundance having separated from the group, headed for the town of Kaycee, hoping to obtain fresh horses. Horses may have been stolen from a freight company. (Chicago Daily Tribune, June 7, 1899.) A claim was made that "Tom Roberts" noted that he had "fixed Joe Hazen," suggesting that he had shot the Sheriff, but in a May 3, 1900, interview in the Wyoming Derrick, DeVore claimed that was a lie, and that the two men in his camp never mentioned shooting Hazen.
June 7. It snows, helping obscure the robbers' tracks. Logan and Currie arrive at Jim Nelson's sheep camp, asking for breakfast.    
June 8. They make it to John Nolen's Kaycee ranch, where they were observed by a young girl visiting Nolen's daughter. Nolen and his brother-in-law then obtained saddles and mounts for them in exchange for gold watches.   A letter from Pinkerton Assistant Superintendent Frank Murray to U.S. Marshal Frank Hadsell confirms that Nolen's brother-in-law was arrested in Des Moines with a watch stolen in the Wilcox robbery, giving credence to the latter claim.
June 9. Joe LeFors joins Frank Wheeler's posse at the Tisdale ranch, and believes he tracks the robbers to EK mountain. Over 50 men in the posse then head to the Brock ranch, near EK mountain, and force the family to give them food and blankets.   At daylight on the 10th, the posse charges up the mountain but finds no robbers.
   June 10. There is a claim that, having slipped past the posse, the robbers doubled back to the Billy Hill ranch, where "Flatnose" went down to pick up horses he'd left before the robbery. Unable to find all of them on the range, he purchased two others and some saddles, and rode off. However, he seems to have been with Logan at Nolen's ranch. This report came from Bill Speck to Tom Horn at the point of a gun, under threat of death if he didn't talk.
  June 10. Harve Flood, a hand at the Tisdale ranch, claimed to have seen Logan and "Flatnose," jumping from sagebrush to sagebrush, trying not to leave tracks as they attempted to move out of the area.  
  June 10 (approx.). Sundance was supposedly seen in Battle Creek, Co., trading a horse and $20 for a fresh mount on his way to Brown's Park.  
June 11. Rejoined by Sundance, the robbers rode north.   The gang loses the posse, and "Flatnose" goes his own way, leaving Logan and Sundance to make their way to Charlie Anderson's hog ranch, near Thermopolis, Wy. They hole up there with some other friends including Tom O'Day and a dentist, Will Frackelton. During the stay, Frackelton records Sundance as noting that Logan liked to see the look on a man's face as he "drilled him."

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Logan and Sundance then linked up with Bob Lee and Lonie Logan in Choteau County, Mt., and split the money.

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Butch and Sundance are said to have spent some of the stolen money in Silver City, NM.

Mid-June. Elza Lay and “Red” Weaver seen in Cimarron, NM.    
  June 18. According to impostor Harry Longabaugh, Jr., Sundance and Etta were married at sea.  
June 18. A group of cowboys camped on Crook's creek awakened to find five of their best horses had been taken and five worn out nags had left in their place, presumably courtesy of the Wilcox robbers. (Rawlins Semi-Weekly Republican, June 21, 1899, Natrona County Tribune, June 22, 1899).    
June 19. Sundance, Logan and "Flatnose" reach Crow creek on the Shoshone Indian reservation, and make camp. One of them then heads into Thermopolis for supplies, and buys all the .30-30 ammunition he can find.(The Salt Lake Tribune, June22, 1899.)   Presumably ,they then headed for Anderson's hog ranch, near Thermopolis.

They had 6 horses with them.

June 20. Two men are taken into custody in Beaverhead county, Mt., suspected of involvement in the Wilcox robbery.    
June 24. Joe Bush identifies the men as the Roberts Brothers (presumably the Dixons), while UP postal clerk Dietrich also identifies them as participants in the robbery.

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Word comes out of Wyoming that the railroad has secured the services of some "noted manhunters" who will be given "plenty of money" and all the time they need to track down and kill the robbers even if it takes years to do it. (The Salt Lake Tribune, July 25, 1899.)

  Bush declared them guilty of the Big Piney robbery, but traditionally this is attributed to "Flatnose" with Logan and either Sundance or Lonie as the "Roberts brothers" in that event.

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..

This seems to be the first allusion to a "Super Posse" being formed with the task of taking out Harvey Logan and/or Butch Cassidy, though it does not actually appear until 1900.

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SEARCH WILL CONTINUE

Noted man-hunters to hunt the bandits down.

Cheyenne, Wyo., June 24.--While the sheriff's posse has returned, the soldiers have been ordered back to quarters and the Indian police have been recalled, the search for the Wilcox train-robbers will continue for an indefinite period, as several noted man-hunters have been engaged by the railroad and express companies, and these men will track the robbers to their death. They will be furnished with plenty of money, and can spend even years in the work, if necessary.

-- The Salt Lake Tribune, July 25, 1899.

Mid June? Butch Cassidy and Elza Lay return to the WS ranch.    
Late June. Sundance and Logan were seen in SW Wyoming driving 13 horses toward Brown’s Park.

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Butch Cassidy, back at the WS ranch, informs Wm. French that McGinnis (Lay) will be moving on, and leaving the ranch.

  The two men driving these horses went all the way down into Utah and into New Mexico or Colorado with them.

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Patterson believes they may actually have been Butch Cassidy and Elza Lay, rather than Sundance and Logan.

July 3. Dave Putty and Bud Nolan are arrested in Dillon, Mt., for robbing the Woolton post office with "Flatnose" Currie back in 1898 (while being accused of the Wilcox robbery), but are eventually released.   Putty and Wood [Nolan] were unarmed when arrested. The rancher for whom they worked reports having seen them practicing revolver marksmanship and exhibits a board 4 inches square that they put 17 shots into at 40 steps. shooting backwards over their shoulders with either hand alternatively. Putty said in the county jail that if he got out again, he would make it a point to take a shot at him.

--Natrona County Tribune, July 13, 1899. 

July 5. Lonie buys half interest in George Bowles’ Club Saloon in Harlem, renaming it to Bowles & Curry Saloon.    
July 7. Sam Ketchum and Will Carver buy supplies at Hunt’s General Store in Cimarron, NM., then head for their hideout at Turkey Creek.    
July 8. Elza Lay rides for Ponil Park.    
July 11. Will Carver, Elza Lay, Bruce “Red” Weaver, and Sam Ketchum rob the Colorado Southern train near Folsom, NM. Harvey Logan is traditionally said to have participated. Netted $30,000-$50,000. Harvey Logan not present (according to Donna Ernst). Pursued unsuccessfully by a posse from Huerfano County, Colorado. Sheriff Ed Farr found the gang near Turkey Creek and fought two gun battles over four days. Carver escaped, but Elza Lay and Sam Ketchum were wounded and later captured, though Carver killed Ed Farr and Tom Smith, and wounded deputy Henry Love in the process. (Lay survived his wounds by earlier rigging up a blanket to drip water on them, keeping them clean, an Indian trick.) Lay was sentenced to life for the killings, Ketchum died in jail a few days later, while deputy Love died from his injuries. Lay was pardoned/released in December, 1905, for good behavior and for his part in stopping a prison riot. (Though Matt Warner claiimed the commutation of sentence was due to a mining scam he was running with the Governor and prison warden.)
July 16. After catching up to the Folsom train robbers, sheriff Ed Farr is shot and killed, while Sam Ketchum and Elza Lay are wounded.   Ketchum was caught first, while Lay managed to hold out for a few more weeks.
July 24. Sam Ketchum dies of gangrene.    
Late July. A man, probably Logan, encountered near Powder Springs by Isom Dart and Angus McDougall. The man, driving six horses, asks for news and implores Dart not to mention he had seen him.   Eventually reuniting with Sundance, Logan drives the horses down into Utah, passing through Hanksville and Monticello, Ut., and ultimately reaches Sundance’s cousin’s ranch at Cortez, Co. From there, their course isn’t known with certainty, but they lose Charley Siringo and other agents on their trail. Logan may then have visited his sister Allie in Kansas City.

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Sundance now disappears and isn't seen again for certain until September of 1900 when he participates in the Winnemucca robbery. If he didn't know her before (and I now believe they were already a couple), it's during this time he would have met and courted Etta Place.

Aug. 5. Will Carver is seen in San Angelo, Tx.     
Aug. 16. Elza Lay is captured.    
Aug. 24. Elza Lay and Tom Ketchum are transported by train to the New Mexico Territorial Prison at Santa Fe.    
Late Summer-Fall. Butch tends bar at the Coats and Rowe store in Alma, NM.    
Sep. 18. Silver Tip Walls returned to Loa for trial.

A Negro member of the Wild Bunch, known to reside at Robbers Roost, is captured at Richfield. The man gave his name as Ed Wright, and on him was found a letter from Silver Tip, asking if he "had any of those good tools."

 

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THINK THEY HAVE A ROOSTER

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Negro Arrested in Gleenwood With Letter From Silver Tip.

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Special Correspondence. Richfield, Sept 1. The negro who was supposed to have stolen the valuable saddle from Matthews stable a few nights ago was captured Thursday afternoon at Glenwood. The capture now turns out to be what the officers believe a most important one. A letter was found on the negro from Silver Tip Hawkins stating when he would be taken from Provo to Loa for trial and wound up by asking the negro if he had any of those good tools. It is the belief of the officers that the negro who gives his name as Ed Wright intended to liberate Silver Tip from the custody of the sheriff of Wayne county who will pass with his prisoner from hero to Loa tomorrow. He had taken a horse belonging to a man living in Elsinore, the saddle from here, and armed with a new shotgun and cartridges which he purchased here the day before the thefts he had gone into the mountains along the road which the sheriff would pass. He was seen by several parties going toward Loa and this furnished the trace which led to his arrest. The horse had got away from the negro, however, and he was on his way back to Glenwood to try and recapture it when he was arrested by Sheriff Coons. He at first denied the stealing but finally admitted that the he had taken the saddle and had left it at a sheep ranch on the mountain. When asked why he followed the horse back when he was almost sure of being found out, he said he did not want to go away very far that he had business around where he had been.

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He is very anxious that the charge against him be made petit instead of grand larceny. He was well posted on what constituted the offenses and wanted the officers and Mr. Matthews to value the saddle at less than $50.

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The sheriff of Wayne county on his way after the prisoner Hawkins last Thursday met the negro crossing the mountain east of Glenwood but did not have suspicion him at the time When he arrived here and was informed of the capture and the letter found on the negro made a careful scrutiny of him and is convinced that he is the negro who has been connected with the Robbers Roost gang. He had seen the negro at the Roost and is quite sure this is the same one. Circumstances tend to prove this is correct and it is fortunate that the negro was taken into custody before Silver Tip was taken back as it is probable there would have been a tragedy. His preliminary hearing will be held tomorrow at 2 o'clock.

--The Salt Lake Herald, Sep. 18, 1899.

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We do not know much about this man. He had been arrested before for assaulting a woman. Was his name an alias? Possibly. Was he Bill Moore, the escaped prisoner from Deadwood? Again, possibly. We do not know. We only know there is a claim he was seen at Robbers Roost, and that he knew Silver Tip Walls, one of the first outlaws of Robbers Roost.

October. Nolan and Putty are released for lack of evidence on the Wolton and Big Piney robberies.    
Oct. 2. Elza Lay's trial begins.    
Oct. 10. Elza Lay, convicted of 2nd degree murder, goes to prison for life.    
Oct. 19. A James C. Lyle and another man are taken into custody at Rigby, Id., on charges of being involved in the Wilcox robbery.   OGDEN, Utah, Oct. 22.--Sheriff Layne, of Ogden, has captured one of the parties concerned in the holdup of the Union Pacific train at Wilcox. Wyo., on June 2, when a large amount of money was taken from the express company's safe. The man is James C. Lyle and he was taken at Rigby, Idaho, Thursday. He was not told why he was being arrested until the officers had succeeded in spiriting him over the line into Utah. Lyle, as well Donald, the man who gave information leading to the arrest, whom the authorities think had some connection with the robbery himself, are now locked up in this city. Donald, who apparently knows all of the details of the robbery, say that there were nine men in the gang, which included the notorious leader of the "Robbers' Roost" gang, Butch Cassidy, Lyle and others. Donald says that after the gang escaped from the officers, who had them rounded up in Wyoming at the time of the killing of Sheriff Hazen, of Rawlins, Wyo., they went over the Big Horn mountains down into the Wind River country, on down toward the Sweet Water and again touched the Union Pacific at Green river, where they took trains for all directions.

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Among Lyle's effects was a discharge from Troop G, First U. S. cavalry, better known by the name of Torrey's Rough Riders.

-- Kansas City Journal., Oct. 23, 1899.

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Train Robbers Captured Again.

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The Wilcox train robbers, or at least one of them, have been caught again, so dispatches say, but the truthfulness is doubted by many. The supposed robber gives the name of James P. Lyle, and it is claimed was betrayed by a companion by the name of Donald. A dispatch from Ogden, Utah, where the arrest was made, says in part:

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"The story by the man Donald is a straight one, and while he claims he was not implicated in the robbery and hold-up, he knows all of the greater and minor details. The story he claims is one told him by Lyle, and he says Lyle has always claimed that he was one of the party which held up the train, and that the gang numbered seven men. Among the robbers were two McCartys and Butch Cassidy, Lyle and three others.

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The story of the escape from the officers when it was reported from the officers when it was reported that they were surrounded and could not get away is told by Donald. He says that the gang, when they got away from the gang at that time, went on over the Big Horn mountains, down into the Wind River country, on down toward the Sweetwater and again touched the Union Pacific, and Green River, where they took trains for all directions."

--Wyoming Derrick, Oct. 26, 1899.

Late October. Lonie drives a buggy to Washington Gulch, arriving drunk, intending to seek out Bob Lee at his mining claim.   A couple of days later, he and Lee depart for Harlem.
Nov. 25. Lonie buys out Bowles’ interest in the saloon, renaming it to the Curry Bros. Club Saloon.    
Dec. 20. "Flatnose," broke, contacts his father, asking for money.    
Dec. 28. After remodeling, Lonie's saloon reopens and sponsors a turkey shoot.    
Late 1899. A Pinkerton agent, tracing Wilcox bills showing up in Silver City, NM, shows a “group photo” to the owner of the WS ranch, and he identifies one of the men in it as “Jim Lowe” (Butch Cassidy).

Storekeeper Elton Cunningham claimed that Sundance visited Butch--who was bartending at the time--in Alma, NM., late in 1899. Around the same time, Ben Kilpatrick was hired on at the WS ranch under the moniker of “Big Johnny” Ward.

Logan cousin Bob Lee indicated that Sundance, using the name of Frank Scramble, made his way to Texas after the Wilcox robbery and sent money back from the area around Galveston for horses used in the robbery.

However, Sundance is traditionally believed to have remained in Montana, working at the N Bar N ranch through the Winter.

  This appears to have been a photo of some of the Wild Bunch that has been lost to history. It was not the "Fort Worth Five" photo.

 

If it's true Sundance was in Texas during the Winter of 1899 through Summer of 1900, he may have met Etta Place during this period if he did not know her previously. Either way, their relationship must have heated up during this time, resulting in an engagement and marriage at some point.

  Winter, 1899-1900. According to Pearl Baker, "Flatnose" lived in a cave in Rattlesnake Canyon, Ut.   

   

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1900

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

  January. "Flatnose" may still have been living in the cave in Rattlesnake Canyon, Ut.   
  Winter. According to the Anaconda Standard, July 4, 1901, both Logan and Sundance visited Malta, Mt. in Winter of 1900.

According to the article, Sundance couldn't help shooting off his mouth to a waitress.

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When Kid Curry came up to Malta a year ago last Winter, Longabaugh was with him, and they made no attempt at concealment. One day the two men went into a restaurant in Malta, and Longabaugh asked the woman who waited on them if she remembered them.

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"I am Harry Longabaugh," he said, "the man who held up the Great Northern passenger train, and I don't care who knows it!"

--Anaconda Standard, July 4, 1901.

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This is the same thing he did in South America that got he and Butch in trouble.

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The article goes on to state that he and "Kid Curry" traveled together and exchanged some mutilated money (consistent with what happened with the money at Wilcox) in the Cascade bank, and that "Curry" was soon killed near St. Louis.

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The paper is obviously in error on the latter claim, and could indicate Sundance was traveling with Lonie (who was on the run in January), not Harvey; or it may simply be confusing Lonie with Harvey, who supposedly left Kansas City to meet up with Sundance in February.

Jan. 5. Lonie, warned that the Pinkertons are closing in on him, sells his saloon and goes on the run, eventually fleeing to his aunt’s at Dodson, Mo.    
Jan. 21. Matt Warner released from the Utah State Penitentiary.    
February. On a hunt for Jack Moore and other outlaws, Joe Bush, Jesse Tyler and Herb Day supposedly penetrate Robbers Roost and find it deserted.    
Feb. 1. Harvey Logan departed Kansas City to link up with “Frank Scramble” (Sundance) in New Mexico.    
Feb. 12. Two men rob Bowman’s Bank in Las Cruces, NM.   Netted $4,000. Pat Garrett led the posse unsuccessfully chasing the robbers, and arrested upwards of ten innocent men as he cast a wide net, trying to find the bandits.\

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Possible culprits may have included Harvey Logan, Will Carver, Ben Kilpatrick, Harvey Logan, the Sundance Kid, or Butch Cassidy.

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Newest research suggests the real Tom Capehart, and not Harvey Logan, may have done the robbery, or that Oscar Wilbur and William Wilson were participants

Feb. 20 (approx.). Lonie Logan arrives at his aunt's in Dodson. (Laramie Daily Boomerang, March 10, 1900.)    
Feb. 28. Lonie Logan shot by a posse of lawmen and Pinkertons while fleeing his aunt’s house in the snow.

Cousin Bob Lee was later arrested at the Antler Club in Cripple Creek, while he is dealing a game of stud poker.

  His biography of the Wild Bunch is filled with errors so it is hard to know what to believe, what is correct, or what may or may not be exaggeration, but according to Frank Lamb's biography of the hang, he claimed Harvey Logan was told by his aunt that Lonie was actually was ambushed and shot on his way to the outhouse.

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According to a newspaper report, when he was killed, the aunt supposedly looked out a window and spotted four agents approaching in a four-horse sleigh and told Lonie, whereupon he bolted out the back door where other agents were approaching in second sleigh. Then his running gunfight started. (Laramie Daily Boomerang, March 10, 1900.)

March 7. Cousin Bob Lee arrives in Denver on his way north to answer for the Wilcox robbery.    
March 28. Deputies Andrew Gibbons and Frank LeSeuer are shot and killed by five men. Harvey Logan and Will Carver are traditionally tagged with the shooting, but modern historians attribute it to Tom Capehart and associates. Harvey Logan and Will Carver, after passing notes from the Wilcox robbery, are spotted in St. Johns, Az. After a chase.  
March. Butch is tending bar in his own saloon.    
March 20. Warned by William French, the owner of the WS, that the Pinkertons are asking questions, Butch sells his interest in the saloon and leaves town with "Red" Weaver. Several other members of the Wild Bunch, including Harvey Logan, had already headed north.    
March 29. After rustling some horses from N. M. Ashby, who had been rustling WS cattle, Butch Cassidy and “Red” Weaver are jailed at St. Johns, NM.    
April 5. Still on the run, the killers of Gibbons and Leseuer butcher a cow near the San Simon river, allowing Sheriff George Scarborough and deputized cattleman Walter Birchfield time to catch up, with the result that Scarborough is killed and Birchfield wounded.   Scarborough, badly wounded, eventually dies of blood loss and shock after medical treatment is delayed due to the isolated location of the ambush.
April 17. "Flatnose" Currie killed by Jesse Tyler and two posses near Thompson, Utah, after rustling some cattle. Sundance or Tom Cartwright may have been with him. Currie, marooned across a river after his three horses swam away from him, was found building a raft, and though out of normal shooting range was hit and killed by a brilliant rifle shot from one of the posse.

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Curry's body was picked up, and he was soon identified as one of the Wilcox robbers from the widely published description of him and his peculiar facial make-up. His face was so much "dished" that a ruler laid from the forehead to chin just touched the point of his nose.

--The Columbus journal, May 2, 1900.

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This story came from Joe LeFors, and is of dubious claim.

  April 23. Harvey Logan, Will Carver, and another man appear at the Webster ranch, claiming to be looking for money buried by "Flatnose" Currie. After leaving, they crossed the Colorado river.
April 27. Butch and Weaver appear in court, pleading not guilty to Grand Larceny of horses   After the Sheriff contacts William French, owner of the WS, he releases Butch without realizing who he is. Weaver eventually bailed out after paying $1000.
May. Harvey Logan, Will Carver, and another man are seen in Moab, Ut.    
May 5. Hoping to cut a deal to avoid prison, cousin Bob Lee "rats out" Harvey Logan and Sundance (by the alias of "Frank Scramble") on the Wilcox robbery, and also reveals "Frank Scramble" was one of the participants at Belle Fourche.    
May 26. Harvey Logan, Will Carver and another man ambush and kill Sheriff Jesse Tyler and cattleman Sam Jenkins 40 miles from Thompson Springs, Ut.   Tyler, spying three men huddled around a fire in blankets, thought them Ute Indians, and approached unarmed. The men then opened fire, killing Tyler and Jenkins, and running off Herb Day, the remaining deputy. (The posse had split up earlier.)

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After the shooting, the outlaws stopped at the Turner ranch in Hay canyon, eight miles north and 12 miles east of the shooting, and stole new mounts, saying, "We are going up Hay canyon and will cross the White river. Just as soon as we get some money we will pay you for the horses, providing we ain't killed. One thing is certain--we will never be taken alive!" (San Francisco Chronicle, May 29, 1900).

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Earlier in the month, Jenkins had been relating in a saloon about how exciting the shooting of "Flatnose" was, and when warned by friend Frank Lambert to watch his back, prophetically joked that would be the only way the Wild Bunch would finish him off.

May 29. Cousin Bob Lee convicted of being involved in the Wilcox robbery, despite having witnesses testify he was working a gold claim on the day it occurred.   The jury acknowledged he was innocent of the robbery, but was denied the right to convict him as guilty only after the fact, and so found him guilty as a direct participant. William Pinkerton was in Cheyenne to personally see the verdict delivered.
May 30. Capt. W. S Seavey, then Manager of the Denver branch of the Thiel Detective Service, wrote to Utah Governor Wells: I desire to inform you that I have reliable information to the effect that if the authorities will let him alone and the UPRR officials will give him a job as guard, etc., the outlaw Butch Cassidy will lay down his arms, come in, give himself up, go to work and be a good peacable citizen hereafter.    
May 31. Cousin Bob Lee begins his prison sentence in the Wyoming State Penitentiary in Rawlins.    
June. The Pinkerton “Super Posse” formed.

Butch and Carver arrive at Powder Springs.

  This is the "official" formation; the idea had already been implemented at times back in Wyoming.

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GUARDING A RAILROAD IN THE BANDIT BELT By William MacLeod Rame.

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For years train robbery has been a lucrative and flourishing industry in the United States, and of late "hold-ups" have occurred with alarming frequency. Recently, however, the Union Pacific Railroad, however, resolved to exterminate the outlaws who systematically preyed upon it trains, and the plan adopted is likely to have far-reaching results. Mr. Raine describe the way in which the Union Pacific "bandit belt" is now safeguarded.

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Not long ago train rubbery was a lucrative profession in the Western States of America. To-day It is on its last legs. Several factors have contributed to this desirable result. The extension of the long distance telephone to the ranch lands. followed hard upon the heels of the settlement of the cow country, was the first set back to the flourishing industry. Now the Union Pacific Railroad has put another stumbling block In the way of the outlaw. It was not enough that the whereabouts of the escaping desperadoes could be telephoned from point to point ahead of them, which necessitated their confining operations to the wilder parts of the country. The Union Pacific had a plan to put (them out of business altogether, and the fiat has gone forth from headquarters that the organized bands of train robbers which have been operating In the "bandit belts" are to be exterminated.

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The territory of the different "bandit belts" throughout the western half of the United States has for a long time been clearly defined. One stretches across Texas to Arizona, along the Southern Pacific line; another zigzags through the Colorado Mountains to the country about the well-known Robbers' Roost. A third--and the most dangerous of all--belts Wyoming in the rough cow district, where lies the notorious Hole-in-the-Wall country. Here, among the Teton Mountains, far from the reach of the long arm of the law, there lurked for many years a nomadic population composed of cattle rustlers, highwaymen and fugitives from justice. The district was a natural fortification, and every settler in it had a grudge against the law. Here desperadoes were safe from n sheriff's posse; the wings of the wind whispered the approach of officers, and long before the emissaries of Justice had reached the spot their quarry had fled.

The Hole-in-the-Wall is a valley situated in the Western part of Natrona County, Wyoming. It lies among the foothills southeast of the Big Horn Mountains. The nearest railroad point is more than a hundred miles away. Casper, Cody and Rawlins are the nearest towns, and these are about one hundred and fifty miles distant.

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Circled by inaccessible mountains inhabited by desperate cut-throats, and situated beyond the utmost rim of civilization, for long the Hole-in-the-Wall was a safe haven for the flotsam and Jetsam of Western crime.

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It was from this place that the famous "Butch" Cassidy gang sallied forth at intervals to hold up trains, dynamite banks and rob stages. After each lawless outrage the desperadoes, hotly pursued by posses of officials, dashed back toward their mountain fastnesses. Here, once hidden in the impenetrable caves, they were secure from arrest.

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This gang formed a veritable trust in outlawry, but slowly and surely the forces of the law have exacted payment from them for their misdeeds. Out of nil the desperate dozen of fearless men who made up the band but two are at liberty. They are "Butch" Cassidy himself and Harry Longbaugh, "The Sun-Dance Kid," and both of these have been forced to leave the country. The others are either dead or in prison.

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The well-known "Black Jack" Ketchum and his brother Sam, both as desperate ruffians as ever existed; handsome Ben Kilpatrick, whose dashing ways and beautiful eyes made him a favorite with women; the Curry brothers, fearless men and lawless, both of them: Matt Warner, Tom O'Day, David Lentz, Elza Say, Bill Carver and others belonged to this redoubtable band of robbers. Each of them was a dead shot and ever ready to shoot. It naturally followed that every railroad within reach was held up by this precocious gang.

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At Wllcox, Wyoming, on June 2d., 1899, a Union Pacific train was stopped by a half dozen armed men. They forced the engineer and train crew to uncouple the engine and express car from the train. Then they ran the locomotive down the line for a mile, blew up the express car, and looted it. Their haul was only three thousand dollars.

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Immediately on hearing of the robbery Sheriff Hazen, of Converse County, set out in pursuit. It was believed that the robbers would be headed off by the Platte river, which was in the flood, but they succeeded In swimming it on stolen horses. Where they went Sheriff Hazen could and his posse took the water as well. It was a close race, but Hazen won.

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The flying robbers were forced to turn and fight at Elk Mountain. It was a rough and broken country, and the outlaws had the advantage of knowing every inch of it. From behind boulder and brushwood they held off the posse five men against two hundred. Hazen exposed himself, and next moment reeled back with a bullet through his heart. Darkness fell, and the gang slipped away across the mountains into the Hole-in-the-Wall.

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George Curry, Harvey Logan and Bob Lee were all known to be in this affair. Then came another daring train robbery on the Union Pacific line. At Tipton. Wyoming, on August 29th, 1900. Harvey Logan, George Kilpatrick and "Bill" Cruzan headed the masked hold ups who stopped a passenger train. Again the mail and express car was uncoupled, run up the line, and blown up with dynamite. Fortunately the safe was practically empty, so that the robbers only got thirty dollars. Joe La Fors took the trail at once with a posse. For days the trail was followed, but was finally lost la the heavy timber near Utah line. The bandits had disappeared somewhere In the notorious Robbers' Roost country.

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Then came energetic action at the Union Pacific headquarters. A body of Rangers were organized to defend the line, under the command of Tim Keliher. From that day to this travel through the "bandit belt" on the Union Pacific: line, so far as robbers go, has been as safe as taking a journey from London to Liverpool. Every train carries with It one or more armed guards. They ride on the engine. In the baggage car, on the dry coaches, or in the sleepers, being Instructed not to stay always at one point of the train. Any gang of bandits at tacking a Union Pacific train now will know it has to reckon on a stiff fight, for not only is each train guarded, but somewhere up or down the line is the patrol body of Rangers, ready to be shipped to the danger zone as fast steam can carry them.

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Through the Hole-in-the-Wall runs a telephone line, which has made it untenable for the outlaws, and Robbers' Roost will soon be no safer. The organization of Kelliher's Rangers is the beginning of the end. Other railroads will follow the example of the enterprising "U. P." and take similar precautions for the safety of their express cars and passengers.

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At Parachute, Colorado, the "Butch" Cassidy gang recently gave evidence of its continued activity. On June 7th, 1904, a train was held up, but no booty secured. An untiring pursuit was instituted and the robbers were run down near Rifle, Colorado. In the fusillade that followed the outlaw leader was badly wounded.

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He was heard to shout to his comrades, "Don't wait for me, boys. I'm all in. Good-bye." Next moment he sent a bullet through his own brain. The notorious "Kid" Curry had gone to his last account. The other men escaped for the time, but this attempt marks nearly the close of what was once a very flourishing industry.

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The personnel of Tim Kellher's Rangers practically ensures the efficiency of the corps. First there is Tim Keliher himself, a big man, weighing two hundred and twenty pounds, who is nevertheless as lithe and sinewy as a cat. He is modest to an unusual degree, but is as brave as a lion. Keliher is the chief of the Wyoming branch of the Union Pacific secret service. He Inaugurated his acceptance of the position by breaking up at once an organized band of train employees who were preying on the company and robbing it of thousands of dollars.

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Four of these employees went to prison, ten of them were confined in the county gaol and fined, twenty of them lost their positions. Keliher was a much hated man, but he went on quietly with his work.

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The rest of the Ranger company are as noteworthy as their chief. Joe La Fors is a deputy United States marshal and cattle detective known all over the West. He it was who brought to justice the notorious Tom Horn, who was hanged at Cheyenne for killing settlers at so much per head for the big cattle companies. La Fors, Tom Meggeson and Pat Lawson are among the best trailers in the country. Indeed, Keliher says that La Fors can follow a trail at a hand gallop. Fink was sheriff of Buffalo County, Nevada. George Hiatt is an ex-deputy sheriff, and Jeff Carr has been a law officer at Cheyenne ever since the town was a frontier cattle camp. All of them are dead shots and "as game as wild cats." At Cheyenne may be found the headquarters of the Rangers. At this place their specially fitted gear is kept when it is not on the road. In point of fact, it is nothing more than a baggage car prepared to accommodate them. In one end of it stand the horses, while at the other is accommodation for the men. A number of folding cots, a score of blankets, half a dozen cowpunchers' saddles, a pack saddle, a rack for arms, some canteens, a tin stove, and a pantry are all packed into this narrow compass. This pantry contains such necessaries as coffee, bacon, canned goods and salt. Sometimes, while on the trail, the Rangers kill a cow and cook it on their campfires. Of course, these cots and other impediments are not carried while actually following outlaws. Then the men travel as light as possible, their heaviest baggage being the arsenal of weapons which each one has with him.

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Chief Keliher keeps in close touch with all his men, and can, within thirty minutes of the time of receiving a wire, get his car under way for the scene of the hold-up. A special engine stands ready in the yards at Cheyenne. The men are summoned, the horses are hurried from their stable by the gang-plank, and into the night goes steaming the Rangers' special, with a clear right of way over every train on the track. Within six hours they can be at any point of attack within the "bandit belt." Suppose a train to be attacked at midnight. By daybreak Joe La Fors and Meggeson will be following the trail with eagle eyes.

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The horses also are picked out of a hundred candidates. They are native Westerner like their riders, and each of them is as tireless as his master. Strong legged and wiry, they never look for the end of the road.

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The district which is patrolled lies between Medicine Bow, one hundred miles west of Cheyenne and Green River, Wyoming. It covers about one hundred and fifty miles of broken rock country, which is very little known and sparsely settled. Here the line swings through the bad lands about Point of Bocks, Wamsutter, Fort Steele and Bed Desert. If the day is clear enough the mountains surrounding the Hole-in-the-Wall may be seen in the distance. The worst parts of the line are, of course, patrolled most. Red Desert is a sheep grazing country, and is not used by the herders in summer. Riding swiftly across this desert, a band of train robbers could reach the railroad with being detected. It is to forestall this that the Rangers ride the line.

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Both men and horses are kept in constant requisition to patrol the line and watch for suspicious characters. Occasionally the car is sent out to Medicine Bow or Point of Rocks as the case may be. Here the Rangers and their horses are unloaded. They ride along the line, watching for suspicious characters of whom they may have heard. Meanwhile their special follows a parallel course, keeping in touch with the men and picking them up at any point agreed upon. At no time do the men get more than a mile or two from their wheeled base of supplies, unless they are on an actual chase.

--The Fulton County News, April 26, 1905.

  June. Some authorities in Salt Lake City believed Butch was in the area, seeking to make a deal for amnesty.  
  June 6. Logan, Carver and the third man who shot Jesse Tyler may have been spotted near Piedmont, Id., headed toward Henry's Fork, trying to reach Hole-in-the-Wall.  
June 19. The hunt for Jesse Tyler’s killers is called off.    
  July 4. According to Jack Ryan, Butch, Sundance, and some other key members of the Wild Bunch met at the Brown Palace Hotel to make plans for robbing the Bank of Winnemucca and the Tipton train robbery According to Jack Stroud, Etta Place was also there, and Sundance's friends (these being lesser members of the gang, not the principals) were aware of her presence, but were not introduced to her by name, knowing her only as "Harry's wife."
July 10. The body of Matt Rash, shot by Tom horn, discovered by Flex Myers and William Rife.   Rash was engaged to Ann Bassett. Horn also shot Rash's horse, which had been a gift from Elizabeth Bassett.
July 11. $55,000 stolen from a Denver & Rio Grande train near Folsom, NM.   The Wild Bunch was suspected, but no definite proof was found.
July 13 (approx.). "Gunplay" Maxwell is caught with a handmade gun in his cell, and powder made from match heads.    
Mid-July. Butch Cassidy, in the company of other members of the Wild Bunch, is reportedly seen in Carbon county, Wy., which jibes with a sighting of he and Sundance in Dixon and Baggs in August.  

CASSIDAY IN WYOMING

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Cheyenne, Wyo., July 23. Reports have been received here from Carbon county which state that Butch Cassiday, the notorious outlaw and train wrecker, has been seen in the southern part of that county in company with a number of well known outlaws. It is feared Cassiday is planning a raid on the railroad or the banks of some of the small towns south of Rawlins . Officers of both the railroad and a county will take every precaution to prevent a holdup.

--The Salt Lake Herald, July 24, 1900.

August. Butch and Sundance are seen around Baggs and Dixon, Wy.

Mid-late August. Four horses are stolen from a man named Moore in Idaho, and may have been used in some capacity at Winnemucca.

A white Arabian used by Butch and left for young Vic Button was probably stolen from Kittie Wilkins, a famous Idaho horse breeder, whose prize Arabian. "Powder Face" was taken about the same time.

     
Last week of August. Matt Warner sets out from Salt Lake City to find Butch with an offer of amnesty from the governor of Utah.   After the Tipton robbery, Warner would be telegrammed that the deal was off.
Aug. 29. Tipton, Wy., train robbery Laura Bullion may have participated. (However, subsequent encounters by friends of the participants make no mention of her being with them during the escape.) May have netted under $100 or up to $65,000. The robbery was pulled off at night. Debate rages who was involved. Traditionally, many think Butch was involved, but the participants were likely Harvey Logan, Ben Kilpatrick and William Cruzan along with a man named Perry who was the “dynamite expert” of the group.

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The horses were tethered to telegraph poles.

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E. C. Woodcock was again on duty during the robbery, and managed to hide some cash inside a telescope. (Indianapolis News, Sep. 1, 1900.)

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The railroad first learned of the robbery through the Conductor using a pay telephone.

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Jim Thornhill claimed the robbery was planned and implemented by Harvey Logan in retaliation for Lonie’s shooting.

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The robbers cunningly gathered a string of wild horses, then removed the horseshoes from their own horses and let the wild ones free to mislead posses as they escaped.

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After being notified of the robbery, the Union Pacific, through Special Agent Tim Keliher, dispatched a train with horses and equipment to aid the posses searching for the robbers. Joe LeFors, working under U.S. Marshal Frank Hadsell, participated and chased the robbers for a couple of days before their trail was lost and the posse gave up.

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Logan remembered Woodcock:

"Why you're the same man that was in the other holdup."--Harvey Logan to E. C. Woodcock at Tipton, (Laramie Semi-weekly Boomerang, Sep. 3, 1900).

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Postal clerk Pruitt, who was in charge of the mail car, cut loose from the balance of the train with the baggage car Wednesday night, has returned to Cheyenne. He says that he was lined up with the trainmen while three robbers were dynamiting the express car. The robber on guard stood close by him and talked freely. Among other things, he said:

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Bandit Ruminations.

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Don't know how we will fare here, but we did pretty well at Wilcox. We got a little short of money and come down to get some more. This ain't the train we wanted. That one came through a week ago and carried a lot of government gold, but the man who was a goin' to stop her backed out when he see two cars of bums on board, thinkin' as how they was officers. We'd have done well on that train. But bein' here and needin' money, we thought we better tackle this one, as we are pretty sure she's got money in the safe. We don't want to kill anybody, but we might just do it just the same. We really ought to have killed the engineer in the Wilcox affair, but let him off with a rap on the head. If we ever come across him again and he acts that way we'll have to let him have it. There's no use in anybody acting smart with us. I wish those fellers would get a move on, for we want to get away from here. We gave it to old man Hazen on Tea Pot Creek because he followed us, and if anyone else follows us this time we'll give 'em the same dose. We ain't a skeered much, as we know roads in this country that they don't and anyway if they got close we could give it to 'em."

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…The denials of the Union Pacific Express company aside, it is believed the robbers secured many thousands of dollars from the wrecked baggage express car. While the robbers were at work in the car, it was noticed that they stooped over frequently and picked up articles from the floor which they hurriedly thrust into their pockets. When the car reached Green River, three $20 gold pieces were found on the floor, indicating that a sack of gold coin had been broken open and its contents scattered by the explosion. Then too, when the robbers ran away from the car, it required two men to carry the sack of plunder and load it on a horse.

--Denver Republican, Sep. 2, 1900.

Sep.1. According to a letter found at the outlaws' camp at Winnemucca, Butch was in Riverside, Wy. on this date.    
Sep. 2. The Tipton robbers hide out at Jim Thornhill's until the 22nd.    
Sep. 4. The search is called off for the Tipton robbers.  

CAN'T CATCH TRAIN ROBBERS SAYS ONE OF THE PURSUING PARTY.

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Special Correspondence.

Saratoga Wyo. Sept. 15.

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All hope of capturing the four men who held up, dynamited and robbed the overland express train at Tipton three weeks ago has been given up, and the crime goes on record as one of the most successful and daring robberies in the history of the west.

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Not once has a glimpse of the outlaws been obtained since they mounted their horses and rode away in the darkness after securing the treasure contained in the safe of the Pacific Express company, and their present whereabouts is a mystery to the railroad and express officials and the United States officers.

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The identity of two of the robbers has been decided, however, and this may aid in their capture sooner or later. Deputy United States Marshal Joe Lefors of Cheyenne, who was first on the trail of the bandits with a posse of men and who followed the outlaws for several days through the bad lands south of Tipton until their trail was lost in the sands of the desert, returned to Saratoga a few days ago from the chase and went on east to Cheyenne. While here, he was interviewed as follows:

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I think I know most of the men the participated at the hold up of the Union Pacific train at Tipton, and they are no strangers to the law, either. I also know that two of their number are none other than the notorious Roberts brothers,* the Ute half-breeds who have terrorized the country from Arizona to Montana for several years, and who are two of the three men who held up a train at Wilcox over a year ago.

[* A reference to George and Tom Dixon from Arapahoe county, Co., whose mother was a Ute Indian, known as the "Roberts brothers," though Logan and Sundance also called themselves the "Roberts brothers" on occasion.]

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There were six men in the Wilcox affair. Lonny Curry was killed at Kansas City, George Curry was killed north of Thompson Utah and Bob Lee was sent to the Wyoming state penitentiary for a term of ten years. The three remaining members of the gang, the Roberts brothers and one other. are still at large. I have personally been antiquated with the outlaws for many years. We worked the same roundup in Johnson county together. I knew they were bad men and because I would not take part In their crimes they came to hate me. I took my money and invested in a small bunch of cattle It was not long, however, until they rustled every head I possessed and I was left without a dollar. I made up my mind to rid the country of them and with some friends worked to this end. When the bank of Belle Fourche was robbed, the outlaws made straight for Hole in the Wall country and holed up for the winter after killing six beeves for a food supply. I wired to Cheyenne officers to assist me in running the robbers down as I knew right where they were located, but before assistance came a heavy snowfall made it impossible to push into the mountains and early the next spring the outlaws got away. A year ago last May I notified the Burlington Northwestern and Union Pacific roads to be on the lookout for a holdup and in less than a month the Wilcox robbery occurred.

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The Tipton holdup and the Wilcox affair were managed in exactly the same manner and the robbery executed in precisely the same way: After the robbers left the scene of the Tipton holdup they rode their horses out on the prairie a distance of seven miles and cooked breakfast They were mounted on the very best of horses and led a pack horse. It was very evident they did not fear pursuit but they did fear running into an ambush as they took every precaution and avoided deep canyons and high rocks which might conceal anyone. After eating their morning meal, the robbers rode straight across the sandy desert for a distance of seventy miles without even halting their horses for water. They rode both day and night and from their manner of traveling they were directed by compass. After we followed their trail for several days a heavy rainstorm melted their tracks from the sand and we were unable to determine which direction the robbers had gone and were forced to give up the chase. The route of the robbers was well chosen and was through a wild and uninhabited country. I believe the outlaws have gone to Arizona where they will probably remain for a few months or until next spring when they will make their appearance again at some point along the line of one of the transcontinental railways.

--The Salt Lake Herald, Sep. 17, 1900.

Sep. 2. The Tipton robbers hide out at Jim Thornhill's until the 25th.    
Sep. 7. Butch and Carver buy horses for Winnemucca at Twin Falls, Id.

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Around the same time, Powder Face, the prized Arabian stallion of famed Idaho horse breeder Kitty Wilkins-Baker is stolen, and is believed to be the white horse eventually given by Butch to Vic Button.

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A woman near Grand Encampment spots what she believes are four of the robbers riding toward Hahn's Peak. (The Salt Lake Herald. Sep. 9, 1900.)

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Marshal Hadsell went to investigate the following day.

Sep. 15. Butch, Sundance and Carver, wearing no guns, case Winnemucca and talk to local boys near the stable.   Witness Lee Case reports at times there was a "4th man" with the other three, which may have been a disguised Etta, though two other suspects--J.H. Perkins and Melville Fuller are more likely suspects. See the notes under Nov. 17 and 26.
Sep. 18. Because of a cattle drive coming into town, the robbery of the Winnemucca Bank is delayed one day.    
Sep. 19. Spectacular robbery of the Bank of Winnemucca by three men who are chased by a train and two posses, but eventually escape into Wyoming on relay horses. Probably committed by Butch Cassidy, the Sundance Kid and Will Carver. (Donna Ernst.)

Others attribute it to the Sundance Kid, Harvey Logan and Will Carver, placing Butch at Tipton. (Dan Buck and Anne Meadows.)

In a 1911 newspaper interview purportedly by Sundance, he indicated that he, Butch and Will (George) Carver pulled the job.

Netted $32,000, mostly in gold coins. There is debate whether Butch was present. However, two letters from Butch’s attorney, one of which was to a to a "C. E. Rowe" (Butch used the alias Jim Lowe), were found at the bandit campsite, implying Butch’s participation. The second letter read: Send me a map of the country and describe as near as you can where you found the black stuff so I can go get it. Tell me how you want it handled. You don’t know its value. If I can get a hold of it first, I can fix a great many things favorable. Say nothing about it. It was signed simply, "P."

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Some believe this was coded talk for the burnt bills and charred gold from the Wilcox robbery when the safe was blown open. Marshal Frank Hadsell of Wyoming, informed by Rawlins lawyer Homer Merrill (who, in turn, was told by Jim Rankin), noted that the robbers were spotted in Rawlins exchanging said currency, where "powder-burned currency" and blackened gold coins quickly showed up in local saloons.

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The robbery also bears the hallmarks of a Butch Cassidy operation but for the fact the robbers did not use masks.

There was a cold wave hitting the west as the Winnemucca robbery took place. On Sep. 18, the temperature in Winnemucca was 30 degrees. (Laramie Republican, Sep. 18, 1900.) ,

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The posse was initially stymied by being unable to find riding horses, and had to commandeer draft horses to chase the robbers with, which slowed them down (Ogden Standard Examiner Sep. 26, 1901). This is what probably allowed the switch engine, that started after the robbers behind the posse, to outrun the posse in the four-mile stretch of track between town and the main rail line.

Sep. 22. Jim Ferguson gets into a knife fight with a man named Cook, and is driven out of the area by local citizens.    
Late September, after the 23rd. Logan and Kilpatrick are seen and spoken to 20 miles from Grand Junction, Co.

 

  According to Donna Ernst, Sundance travels to California to visit his brother Elwood after Winnemucca. (Note: She may have changed her view on this as her book seems to have Sundance with Butch after Winnemucca, up until they depart by train for Texas. Her citation of a magazine interview with Sundance also has him spending three weeks after the Winnemucca escape in Wyoming, waiting in vain for Carver to show up, which jibes with the dates in Oct. she has for Sundance and Butch leaving for Texas.)
Sep. 24. The posse gives up the chase for the Winnemucca robbers.    
Oct. 1. Will Carver breaks up with Laura Bullion after meeting Callie May Hunt, one of Fannie Porter's prostitutes, at the San Antonio Exposition and Fair.    
Oct. 11. Isom Dart shot by Tom Horn as he heads to the outhouse.    A pair of .30 calibre shells was found by a tree where the assassin was hiding, and Tom Hicks (Tom Horn) was the only one in Brown's Park known to carry that calibre rifle, which confirmed to many that he was the killer.

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Former Two Bar foreman Hi Bernard later admitted to Ann Bassett that he paid Horn $500 each for murdering Dart and Matt Rash, which caused her to immediately divorce him.

Mid-October. Butch and Sundance are spotted in Rawlins, attempting to exchange charred gold for paper currency.   It's noteworthy that the gold is specifically noted as having been blackened, for this can only have been gold from the Wilcox robbery, cached somewhere and recovered by Butch and Sundance in preparation for their final departure from the US. (Remember that Butch had left remnants of a letter to his lawyer at his Winemucca campsite arguably dealing with Wilcox money.) Interestingly, no witnesses--including some traveling with them--attest to their being seen with the actual gold from Winnemucca, though Charley Siringo claimed storekeeper Charley Gibbons in Hanksville was given gold to hold by Butch after the robbery, which he subsequently picked up. However, Butch's movements north and then down into Texas are fairly well established, and this tale seems either to have been made up by Gibbons to Siringo or else by Siringo to his readers.

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After the robbery, the entire West was on the lookout for cowboys laden down with stolen double eagles (the equivalent of carrying 1,000 nearly silver dollar size gold coins plus smaller size eagles and half-eagles mixed in with the double eagles--not counting whatever Wilcox coins they had, and not counting whatever gold they may have saved over the years). Butch and Sundance, had they retained the spectacular Winnemucca take, coupled with an unknown amount of gold from Wilcox, would have been ticking time bombs for the first suspicious lawman, posse, porter, or railroad agent who spotted them carrying heavy saddlebags or luggage, and investigated. While there is no firm evidence apart from the useless word of Harry Longabaugh, Jr., it is the author's belief that Etta Place was used in the Winnemucca robbery in a support role, and that she ferried the gold to Texas by train, a woman with a heavy trunk conveniently hiding 70+ Lbs. of hidden gold arousing no suspicion, whereas traveling men were being given a second look as a matter of course. We know, for instance, that Sundance gave his rifle away before he boarded the train for Texas--an unthinkable act if he has $20,000+ in gold to keep safe. If, however, the gold was safely in the care of Etta Place, and Butch and Sundance were traveling light, needing only side arms for personal protection, his casual attitude makes much more sense.

Oct. 25. Sundance and Butch spend the night in Robert McIntosh’s general store in Slater, Co.    
Oct. 28. After giving their horses and equipment to friends, Butch and Sundance board a train to Fort Worth at Wolcott, Co., mentioning their intent is to leave for South America.     
Oct.-Nov. Charley Siringo told by Carlisle ranch foreman, Bill Gordon, that he gave a grubstake to the Tipton robbers because they claimed to have gotten no money. By now, Logan and Kilpatrick had linked up with Lafe Young and were headed for Texas, Cruzan having returned to Grand Junction.

Charley Siringo later told by Jim Ferguson, who aided the men before and after the robbery, that the participants were Harvey Logan, Ben Kilpatrick and William Cruzan.

     
November. According to Donna Ernst, the Wild Bunch party at the Maddox Flat Apartments in Fort Worth.    
 Nov. 15. Ann Bassett receives a threatening letter warning her to leave Brown's Park.   Nov. 12. 1900.

Anna Bassett, Ladore Colo.:

You are requested to leave that country for parts unknown within thirty days or you will be killed thirty days for your life. Committee. 

Nov. 17. In Sacramento, Mrs. J. H. Perkins, recently arrived from Nevada with an infant, accuses her husband who had abandoned her (but prior to that had displayed violent behavior) of being one of the Winnemucca robbers.   Perkins, a sheep-shearer, came up independently as a suspect in Winnemucca after he supposedly talked of the robbery before it occurred. He disappeared right after the robbery, and two friends of his were arrested and shown to bank president Nixon who obviously failed to identify them.

FRAIL WOMAN FEARS HUSBAND WILL KILL HER

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Possesses a Secret Which Would Send Him to Prison.

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MRS. PERKINS' ROMANTIC TALE

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Says Her Husband Is One of the Three Men Who Recently Robbed the Bank at Winnemucca.

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Special Dispatch to The Call.

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SACRAMENTO. Nov. 17.-- If the story told by a dressmaker named Mrs. Perkins is true, and the circumstances seem to bear it out. she offers splendid material for the pen of the novelist. A frail, destitute young woman, with a two months' old baby at her breast, seeking protection for herself and child from the fury of a husband whose secret she possesses. This is the light in which Mrs. Perkins, seamstress, presents herself. The secret is one which would send her husband to the penitentiary perhaps for the remainder of his life could it be told in court and substantiated by corroborative evidence. On September 19 at noon three masked men walked into the First National Bank of Winnemucca, Nev., and with cocked revolvers made all present hold up their hands, threatening with instant death the first man who offered resistance. Two of the men held guard while the third forced Cashier Nixon to open the safe and take out three sacks of gold coin. The robbers threw the gold into a large sack which they carried, together with all the gold in the office drawer, and then, still covering the bank officials with their revolvers, marched them ahead to an alley in the rear, where three saddled horses were waiting. The robbers mounted these horses with their booty, some $15000 and dashed cut of Winnemucca like the wind toward the mountains.

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The alarm spread and citizens fired shots after the fleeing horsemen, but without effect. A posse was organized, but its search was fruitless.

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Because the knew that her husband is one of these three bold robbers is the reason assigned for Mrs. Perkins' fear that he will kill her. At one of the houses where she roomed last week it is said that Perkins walked through all the apartments of the house one night with his hand on his revolver and then threat on his lips that he would kill her.

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Mrs. Perkins came a few months ago from Nevada and her husband recently followed. She could not be found in the city to-day. Whether there is foundation in the story, it is certain that the Sheriff's office here has taken up the case and is working: on it in the hope that it may develop the whereabouts of one of the bold Winnemucca robbers.

--The San Francisco Call, Nov. 18, 1900.

Nov. 21. Butch, Sundance, Harvey Logan, Ben Kilpatrick, and Will Carver sit for the famous "Fort Worth Five" photo.    
Nov. 26. J. H. Perkins, after being arrested in Los Angeles for abandoning his wife and child, is returned to Sacramento and questioned about the Winnemucca affair.  

BANK ROBBERY SUSPECT IN SACRAMENTO'S JAIL

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SACRAMENTO. Nov. 26.--A Deputy Sheriff arrived to-night from Los Angeles with J. H. Perkins. He was arrested on a charge of deserting his wife and child, but is suspected of being one of the three men who robbed a bank in Wlnnemucca, Nevada, of $15,000 last September. It is supposed his wife has informed on him.

-- The San Francisco call., Nov. 27, 1900.

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He apparently wasn't returned to Nevada, and neither Dan Buck nor myself have been able to find the disposition of his case. He then disappears from the incident. However, considering he supposedly talked about the robbery beforehand and his wife accused him of the crime, he must be considered a prime suspect for the "fourth man" seen by witnesses hanging around the Winnemucca stables with Butch, Sundance and Carver. Another suspect is rancher Melville Fuller, whose descendant reports to Dan Buck acted as guide to Butch and held a relay team.

  December. Donna Ernst believes the Sundance Kid marries Etta Place in Texas. This is based on a letter written by Sundance to a friend. However, the precise meaning is open to interpretation, though they certainly were married.
Dec. 1. Will Carver marries Callie Hunt and departs on a honeymoon, taking along Harvey Logan and girlfriend Annie Rogers.   Some time during the trip, Logan and Carver disappear for five days to recover Carver’s buried loot from Winnemucca.
Mid-December. Tom Horn sneaks onto the Bassett ranch in a rainstorm, strangles the family dog, creeps onto the porch, and fires two bullets through a hole in the front door at Ann Bassett, who was playing solitaire inside. She, her brothers and two friends remained hidden in the house until the next morning when two ranchers drove by.   Ann eventually went and complained to the governor of Wyoming about Horn's activities, and Joe LeFors was out to work on the case according to her memoirs. He later tricked Horn into confessing to murder.
Dec. 23. Carver breaks up with Callie Hunt.    
Dec. 25. Will Carver visits his family in Bandera county.    

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1901

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

Jan. 1. Sundance and Etta spend New Year's in New Orleans. They then take a train to Pennsylvania to visit Sundance's family, and later visit Dr. Pierce's in Buffalo, then visit Niagara Falls.    
February, 1901. Etta and Sundance meet up with Butch and move in at Catherine Taylor's Boarding House at the corner of 12th St. and Greenwich in New York (234 West 12th Street). They party for a couple of weeks, and pose for their famous "Wedding photo" at DeYoung's photography studio.   Butch arrived before them from St. Louis on New York's Central Pacific Express. The weather was cold but clear.

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After they met up, they went out on the town, and returned home late at night, making an undue amount of noise.

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James Horan claimed DeYoung took a total of six photos of Sundance and Etta: four of the famous portrait, and two individual shots. He gives no source for this claim, and must be at least partially right since a photographer would have taken more than one shot to be certain of making the print. In any event, the additional photo(s) have been lost to history.

Feb. 2. Ann Bassett leaves by stagecoach for Texas.    
Feb. 4. Butch buys a gold watch at Tiffany’s. Sundance and Etta pose for their famous photo. Etta and Sundance possibly marry at City Hall on Feb. 4 if they did not marry in Niagara Falls or prior to that.  
Feb. 20. Etta, Butch and Sundance sail for South America on the Herminius.    
March. Will Carver mails $70 to Callie Hunt from Christoval, Tx.\

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Will Carver and George Kilpatrick are seen around Knickerbocker, Tx, driving around in a rubber-tired buggy, posing as horse-buyers. They later case the bank in Sonora.

   
March 23. Etta, Butch and Sundance arrive in Buenos Aires and check into the Hotel Europa.    
March 25. Sundance deposits $12,500 in an Argentine bank.    
March 27. Logan shoots Kilpatrick neighbor Oliver Thornton over an argument about some hogs. Immediately, Logan, Carver and the Kilpatrick brothers leave the area.   Logan is generally accepted as being the shooter, though a n Oct. 19 newspaper article claimed Kilpatrick, after being incarcerated and questioned, admitted it.

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Ed Kilpatrick, who reported the crime that night in Eden, claimed Thornton arrived armed and intimidating. Boone Kilpatrick affirmed that "Charles Walker" did the shooting, and that Carver was said Walker, but he may have been pinning the murder on Carver, who was killed in Sonora. Logan certainly used that alias.

Spring. Ben Kilpatrick and Laura Bullion spend time at the Lambert ranch near Douglas, Az.    
April. Callie Hunt is shown a photo of the "Fort Worth Five" by the Pinkertons and identifies the men by their aliases, which leads to their eventual positive identification.    
April 2. Will Carver, failing to draw his pistol as it catches in his suspenders, is shot by Sheriff Elijah "Lige" Briant and a posse in Owens' Feed Store in Sonora, Tx., while getting supplies before an intended robbery of the First National Bank. Carver dies at the Courthouse/jail, while accomplice George Kilpatrick was wounded and captured. His last words were: "Die game, Boys."   Carver supposedly lingered for three hours before expiring (Houston Daily Post, April 8, 1901).

Harvey Logan and Ben Kilpatrick, hearing the gunfire while waiting on the outskirts of town, escaped to Dove Creek.

 

April 4. Will Carver is buried in the Sonora Cemetery.    
April 9. “Red” Weaver shot and killed after getting fresh with a girl at a dance.     
April 30. "Deaf Charley" Hanks released from prison.   Our investigations show that when he came out of prison a year ago he sought to find Harry Longbaugh again, and Harvey Logan, the chief and the cleverest of all the train robbers that have operated in this country during the last twenty-five years. In search of them, he went to Malta, Mont., in June last. Failing to find them, he then went to Harlem, Mont. Whether he met them there I do not know, but on July 3 last, the Great Northern train was held up at 2 o'clock p. m. at Wagner, Mont., by three unmasked men, 0. C. Hanks, Harvey Logan and Ben Kilpatrick of Paint Rock, Tex. They procured $41,500. The bills belonged to the Montana National Bank, and were unsigned, being on the way from Washington, D.C. to Helena. The Pinkerton Agency was called upon, and, procuring descriptions from the trainmen, we ascertained the robbers to be Hanks, Logan and Kilpatrick.

--Quote by Pinkerton agent in the San Angelo Press, April 30, 1902.

May 9. The US is thrown into calamity as the stock market collapses due to a power play by EH Harriman against JP Morgan in a battle over the Northern Pacific Railroad.   In the ensuing crash that followed, Union Pacific stock lost $9.50/share, slashing the value of the company, and costing Harriman much of his personal fortune and reputation.

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Harriman had done ten thousand times worse to himself in a day than the Wild Bunch could do in a lifetime of robberies.

May 15. The "Fort Worth Five" photo appears on Pinkerton wanted posters.    
Late May. Etta, Butch and Sundance hire Chilean Francisco Albornoz to take them to Curhue Grande. They soon arrive in Cholila and begin life as ranchers, erecting a cabin.   They may also have opened a store in town, hiring someone to run it for them. 
June. "Deaf Charley" Hanks, searching for Harvey Logan, arrives in Malta, Mt, and then heads for Harlem.    
June 9. Tom O'Day is arrested in Kayon for assaulting a woman. (Natrona County Tribune, June 13, 1901.)    
June 11.Butch and Sundance purchase 16 horses for the ranch from the Fofo Cahuel estancia.

Logan brother in law, Lee Self, shot and killed by miner William Shurlock in Landusky after pulling a gun on him.

  They paid with a check. 

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Self beat William Berry, a helpless elderly miner, whereupon Shurlock denounced him as a coward. When Self drew, Shurlock beat him to the draw, and mortally wounded Self. (The Anaconda Standard June 12, 1901)

  June 12. A cowboy may have foiled an initial plan by Logan and his gang to rob a train by Granger, Wy. (The Nevada State Journal, June 12, and the Philipsburg Mail, June 28, 1901.) The cowboy found 200 Lbs. of dynamite hidden in a ravine alongside the Union Pacific tracks near Granger (not Green River as reported--Omaha Daily Bee, June 17, 1901). He and a friend hid it and alerted authorities who set up a watch.

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Subsequently, two (other reports say three) well-armed men rode up two nights later, cursed when they found the dynamite gone, and spurred their horses before they could be captured, then fled to the mountains.

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800 POUNDS OF DYNAMITE FOUND NEAR U. P. BRIDGE.

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Last Sunday a cowboy discovered 800 pounds of dynamite hidden in a deep ravine hidden alongside the Union Pacific track six miles east of Green river, Wyo., says a dispatch to the Salt Lake Herald. With the assistance of a companion he removed the explosives to another place and notified the authorities. A watch was kept on the ravine and Tuesday night three mounted and well-armed men rode to the place where the dynamite had been hidden. Discovering that the powder had been moved, the outlaws cursed roundly and put spurs to their horses and fled to the mountains before the officers could intervene.

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Officials are satisfied that a plan had been laid to blow up the bridge that spans the ravine and to wreck or rob an express train. Not only the actions of the men, but their talk indicated Tuesday night was the night set for the deed. One of the outlaws was heard to remark that he guessed they would have to pass up the treasure safe this time.

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The accidental discovery of the dynamite undoubtedly frustrated a daring attempt to wreck a train, and perhaps destroy many lives. The company has been expecting an attack from train robbers ever since the Table Rock affair last year, and guards have been riding on all passenger trains carrying money or valuables. Union Pacific secret service men are now at work on the case, and an effort will be made to trail the three men to their hiding place in the mountains.

-- Philipsburg Mail, June 28, 1901.

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While we cannot pin this event with absolute certainty on Logan, Kilpatrick and Hanks, the MO fits them, and no further train robberies took place in Wyomig for the rest of the year. Either they attempted this robbery and moved up to Montana to rob the Great Northern after its failure, or different perpetrators gave up altogether after the plan went awry. I believe the former.

Late June. Alter their plans to rob a train at Granger fall through, Logan, Hanks and Kilpatrick camp near the Truax and Walsh ranches, cutting a deal for the loan of some horses in preparation for the Flyer.   In 1903, "Six Shooter Bob" Walsh would supposedly get into an argument with Joshua Truax in Dick Pledge's Hindsdale saloon over some horses. (Brown Waller claimed it was over this incident.) Walsh would shoot Truax in the neck, be charged, intimidate witnesses, and quickly be found guilty of murder.
  Late June. Logan, Hanks and Kilpatrick may have worked on a ranch south of the Milk river in the days before the Malta robbery. (Chicago Tribune, July 5, 1901.)  
July 1. "Deaf Charley" Hanks, having hooked up with Logan and Kilpatrick, arrives in Malta to scout the Flyer in preparation to rob it, and is seen hanging around Denson's saloon across from the train station.   At his trial on Sep. 13, 1902, Harvey Logan claimed to be in France at this time. 
July 3. Harvey Logan, Ben Kilpatrick,and "Deaf Charley" Hanks commit the Great Northern Coast Flyer train robbery near Wagner, Mt.  

Netted up to $65,000,* gold watches, and a bolt of silk. "Deaf Charley" snuck onto the coupling between the tender and baggage car, and hijacked the train to a prearranged point where he, Logan and Kilpatrick then robbed the express car, blowing up the safe with dynamite. Before leaving, Smith asked for a souvenir, and Logan emptied his .44, and handed it over, saying, "Thanks for your help."

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* A notation in a dictionary found in Laura Bullion's possession when arrested had a notation of "45,500, 51.000 H. in W: Wyoming" in it, possibly referring to the take.

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Fireman Michael O'Neill seemed to identify Kilpatrick as the hijacker:

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"I first saw this man [Kilpatrick] coming over the tender. He had a big pistol in his left hand and a smaller one in his right hand. When he saw that I saw him, he covered me with his pistol and told me to go on with my work. I complied. Then he came toward me and engineer T. R, Jones. He kept one pistol on me and the other on Jones.

"'What does this mean?' said Jones.

"'It mean this is a robbery, and it is going through,' the fellow said as he climbed on the seat by the engineer's side.'

Fireman O'Neill then related in detail the story of the robbery, adding: "After looting the safe and getting the money, they had horses standing there and they rode away at a gallop, shooting all the while."

--The Frederick, Maryland, News, Nov. 14, 1901.

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.The robbers were described as follows:

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One of the men weighs 195 Lbs. He wore a long beard on his chin and a week's growth of whiskers covered the rest of his face. He wore new tan shoes, a black coat and vest and corduroy trousers. His revolver was suspended from his neck by a thong. [This would have been "Deaf Charley."]

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Another of the gang is described as six feet tall. He is not stoutly built. He has sandy complexion and blue eyes. There is a slight scar over his left eye. He appears to be a working man. He wore a black coat and vest and blue overalls. His shoes were black. His revolver was carried in a bootleg scabbard. [This would have been Kilpatrick.]

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The man who did all the shooting with the Winchester is believed to be Kid Curry. He is described as follows: His eyes are jet black. He has a prominent nose and clear-cut features. It is believed he will weigh 180 Lbs. While his shoulders are conspicuously square, they are slightly stooped. He wore a black slouched hat. The gun he had resembled a Winchester.

--The Anaconda Standard, July 5, 1901.

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HOW THE TRAIN WAS ROBBED NEAR WAGNER

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"I guess you better stop down by that bridge," said the fireman to the engineer, who was leaning out the cab window.

"For why?" asked the engineer.

"Because," replied the fireman in an emotionless manner, "some gentlemen want to hold up the train." And then the engineer looked down the barrel of a gun the fireman had previously looked into.

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That is the way engineer Thomas Jones now tells the story of the Great Northern west bound train seven miles west of Malta and two miles east of Wagner. Wednesday afternoon, July 3, a hold-up that was the most perfectly arranged if not the boldest ever seen in Montana.

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From the days of the stage hold-ups down through the short list of train robberies and attempted robberies in the state, nothing more sensational in the annals of crime of that character has been known. The haul of $41,000 was good, too, and that added to the interest in the story. All the United States has been talking about the case.

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The scene of the robbery is a pretty spot, with the vivid green coloring of the late spring still lingering to add color to the landscape. The Milk river swings close to the track at this point, its banks fringed with cottonwood trees.

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The distance from the track south to the stream is not more than 100 yards, which includes a drop over a steep bank down to the water. On the north side of the track the hill rises steeply upward. Just a few yards west of where the engine stopped is a little bridge over a sandy depression.

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South of the river in the clump of trees traces of a camp have been found, and it is thought the men who afterward committed the robbery remained there several days before making the attack. There seems no doubt whatever that they planned to meet this particular train, evidently having information of the $41,000 that was to be in the express safe that day.

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The man who is thought to be Harry Longabaugh boarded the train at Malta, getting on the rear of the engine tender. Conductor A. D. Smith saw him just as the train was starting out and ordered him off. The man "threw down" a 45 revolver--"threw down" is Montana vernacular for drawing a gun--on Smith and told him to go on about his business. Mr. Smith is not a large man, nor is he overyouthful. He obeyed. On the train he reported to Sheriff Griffith of Glasgow, who was as passenger, and together they planned to arrest the man when the train stopped at Wagner, although that station was in another county--Choteau. The train, however, was stopped before it reached Wagner.

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As it was speeding along toward the little bridge Longabaugh crawled over the tender and poked his gun into the cab. Both fireman and engineer were taken off their guard, and rendered a verdict that the man had the drop on them. When instructed to stop at the little bridge, Engineer Jones demurred, saying he had only a little water in his engine.

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"Well, you've got enough for fifteen minutes, haven't you?" said the robber.

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"I guess I have," said Jones.

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"That's all we want," retorted Longabaugh.

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Just in the spot indicated the train stopped, and two armed men came up from under the bridge. Sheriff Griffith had his head out the window by this time. Realizing the situation, he opened fire with his revolver. He had fired only two shots when one of the men, supposed to be Kid Curry, whirled about and opened fire in the direction of the sheriff. His first shot from a rifle splintered the window sill and the sheriff withdrew his head to keep it from being blown off.

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The story of what followed is well known. Engineer and fireman were first ordered out of the train and placed on the north side of the track near the engine. The express messenger, George Smith, joined the group under compulsion, and then came Mail Clerk Martin out of his car under guard and lined up with them.

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One of the three men stood guard over the party. Kid Curry began shooting down one side of the train and then the other, jumping back and forth from one side of the car to the other and shielding himself behind the prisoners, and Longabaugh tackled the express car. The mail car was first behind the engine, the baggage car the second, and the express car the third.

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Curry's shooting was rapid and accurate. George Woodside, the rear brakeman, was his first victim. As the train stopped, Woodside swung to the ground, only to receive a bullet in the shoulder. Little Mary Wilson, 14 years old, a passenger for a state of Washington town, came next. She looked out the window out of curiosity and a ball went through her arm, inflicting a severe flesh wound. A. W. Douglas, traveling auditor of the Montana Central and Great Northern, also got curious and received the same punishment, a bullet through the arm. This checked all curiosity on the part of the passengers.

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Passengers in the smoker, just back of the express car, were warned to go back further in the train, as an explosion was about to take place. The fool always to be found in a panic contributed to the wild excitement that already existed in the train by rushing back yelling: "They are coming through! Hide everything you've got."

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It is said on excellent authority that there was a wonderful display of hoslery in the cars in the next few minutes. There were some ludicrous scenes, people hiding their valuables in all sorts of odd places, immediately forgetting where they were.

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Meantime Longabaugh was working briskly at the front of the train. He called Fireman O'Neill to his assistance and gave him some pointers on train robbing as a fine art. O'Neill was given three little bags of dynamite to carry, had to hold the tools and in other ways to act as slavey. The robbers were seemingly well aware of the fact that the express messenger had not the combination of the two through safes, so did not bother that official, but speedily and expeditiously Longabaugh drilled holes for the explosion, put it in and exploded first one safe and then the other.

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The explosions wrecked the car, leaving the frame on the tracks a mess of splinters, but not damaging the running gear. Planks and pieces of ventilators were scattered for 100 yards. The explosions shook the whole train and contributed not a little to the fright of the passengers.

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George Cunningham, who owns a ranch two miles north of Wagner, was riding by, a quarter of a mile away. He stopped to look on as the work began, Curry remarked that the man didn't look good to him, "rubbering there," as he expressed it, and began shooting at Cunningham. The latter turned his horse and tried to get away, but the fourth shot hit the horse in the hip, passed through its body and came out through the cantle of the saddle.

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Cunningham, of course, was furious. He started at once for Wagner and sent the alarm for Malta, from which came a few men, who joined Cunningham and Sheriff Griffith in the chase which was organized presently.

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When all was done and the robbers had gathered up their spoils in a gunny sack, they strolled across the little stretch of open sward and dropped down over the bank. At this point many critics think the people on the train had a chance to do some judicious shooting. Those on board, however, explain that they had no rifles and that revolvers were no match for the arms the robbers had. Further, they say that to have run up to the bank over which the men had disappeared was too great a chance to take.

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Before leaving, 45 minutes after they had stopped the train, the robbers had warned the engineer and conductor not to start for 20 minutes. The train waited hardly that long, for the robbers, crossing the river on a raft they had ready, disappeared in the grove after their horses.

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Sheriff Griffith, Cunningham and two employees from Cunningham's ranch started in pursuit, going south. Malta and Glasgow were made in each to raise a posse. Under Sheriff Richard Kane at Glasgow had some small luck getting Colonel Robbins and two others to join him. He took them to Malta by special train, where he engaged Pete Saunders, an old cow-puncher, as guide. The justice of the peace at Malta had rounded up some good horses for the posse, but before it was ready to start some miscreant had driven them off. This caused a delay until midnight.

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This fact only illustrates the sympathy there is throughout that country with the robbers. The Curry gang has many friends, even among the better class. There are good, upright citizens--in the eyes of the community--who will tell you confidentially that they would join in the chase for what they term "blood money," referring to the reward. And if they grow real confident they will tell you that they wouldn't mind placing a few horses out on the prairie in a convenient place if they thought the boys needed them. Train robbing, in the eyes of a large number of citizens in the vicinity of Malta is by no means a crime so long as it is not accompanied by murder. To be sure, there are some citizens who, in equal confidence, will tell you that the robbers should be apprehended; that they are entitled to no sympathy; that their wounding of a helpless little girl was a bit of heartless brutality and that to give sympathy to the men is criminal, but these citizens recognize that the sentiment of the community is against them, and they do not talk too loudly of their beliefs.

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Why? Because they fear, whether their fears are groundless or founded in fact, that if they take too prominent a part in the chase or talk too freely some retribution will be visited upon them. They tell of innumerable cases of horse and cattle thievery, they point to the running off of Smith & Trafton's bunch of horses two nights after the robbery as an example of spite work, and when they go out of town they go armed. It is curious, by the way, all say how the men in that country carry Winchesters when they go out in the range for any purpose. Revolvers do not seem to be big enough for them. Nobody seems to be harmed by the practice, however.

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Of course, Malta, Glasgow and neighboring towns--anything within 50 miles is neighboring up there--were greatly excited over the robbery and the start of the posses, and as the telegraph spread the story the train on its way westward with its wounded was met at each succeeding depot by larger crowds.

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As already told in the Standard, representatives of this paper dispatched to the scene immediately after the robbery traced the route taken by the men for 30 miles south and east, gathered news of the posse as the chase progressed, sent it back by couriers to the Malta telegraph office and furnished the only reports that the railroad companies and the authorities in the outside world received until the chase was abandoned.

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From the south bank of the Milk river the three robbers, riding respectively a brown, a gray and a buckskin horse and leading a bay, headed across the long rolling ridges of the prairie to the south bearing a trifle east until they came to the Malta road, 14 miles south of that place. It was a rapid, wearing journey, over the sun-baked, sheep-eaten and scanty turf, beneath a blazing sun that rolled beneath the heat waves along the horizon until they shaped themselves into dazzling mirages. Now and then an alkali hole, its water brackish and cloudy with the chemical, the banks white with sediment, was passed. Here and there the white shelter tent or canvas-covered wagon of a sheepherder could be seen. Most of these were avoided. One or two, however, the robbers passed close at hand and called to them to message in tones of bravado: "Tell 'em we are going south!"

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They passed the ranch of senator Ben Phillips, 25 miles south of Malta, and a mile or so beyond the hog ranch of Jack Ellis, where they were seen by Mr. and Mrs. Ellis, and a little further along by Jim Jackson, who asserts that Kid Curry recognized and spoke to him. Here the trail disappears.

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The posses followed as best they could with poor mounts and some of their members not accustomed to hard riding. Cunningham was first to quit. He returned home Thursday, pretty well tired out. The guide, Pete Saunders, became disgusted with affairs and left the posse near the Circle C outfit, 40 miles south of Malta, Friday morning. His party had ridden through to that place from Malta, stopping only at Phillips' ranch for breakfast, in 11 hours. It had passed the sheriff's party, which had remained over night at a sheep camp, somewhere en route, but was joined by that crowd later on Thursday at the Circle C.

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From there the route south was taken by the posse to the point on the Missouri known as Rocky Point, 100 miles south of Malta, under the guidance of George Baker, and old trapper who has been working as a wolfer for the Circle C outfit.

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They worked about there until last Monday without avail, having trouble getting horses and meeting with many discouragement. Then they returned home, reaching Malta Tuesday.

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In the meantime, following up on the large reward, offered immediately on the news of the crime reaching St. Paul, Ronald Stewart, general superintendent of the Great Northern Express Company, went to Havre, from which place he and the railway officials have directed the search in other directions.

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Ihe description of the men who did the hold-up, as telegraphed broadcast by the express company is as follows: One of the men weighs 195 pounds. He wore a long beard on his chin, and a week's growth of whiskers covered the rest of his face. He wore new tan shoes, a black coat and vest and corduroy trousers. He revolver was suspended from his neck by a leather loop. This is believed to be Longabaugh.

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Another of the gang is described as being six feet tall. He is not stoutly built. He has sandy complexion and blue eyes. There is a slight scar over his left eye. He appears to be a workingman. He wore a black coat and vest and blue overalls. He shoes were black. His revolver was carried in a bootleg scabbard.

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The man who did all the shooting with the Winchester is believed to be Kid Curry. He is described as follows: His eyes are jet black. He has a prominent nose and clear-cut features. It is believed he will weigh 180 pounds. While his shoulders are conspicuously square, they are slightly stooped. He wore a black slouched hat. The gun he had resembled a Winchester.

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Longabaugh has long been a friend of the Curry family, and has many of their same characteristics. In 1892, he, with Billy Madden and Harry Bassett, held up the Great Northern train only a few hundred yards out of Malta. The scene was just west of the railroad bridge which spans the Milk river as the road leaves the town on its way west. The three men then did not understand safe blowing--a trick which Longabaugh has learned since. They went through the passengers, but their returns were small. Madden and Bassett were captured, the one getting six years and the other eight years. Longabaugh made his escape over the same route as that he took the other day. In recent weeks he has appeared in Malta and has not tried very hard to escape recognition.

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The Curry family history is interesting. There were three boys, two of whom, have met violent deaths. Those who knew them when they first arrived in Northern Montana 15 years ago say they were all bright and intelligent youths, ordinarily of quiet manner and possessing many companionable traits, Their blood and breeding were wrong, however. They were from guerilla stock, their father and his father before him being "gun fighters," engaged desperately in the border warfare of generations ago in Kansas and Missouri.

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The boys settled in northern Montana, not many miles from the scene of the recent robbery and made a number of friends, They were gay and reckless, but also had streaks of industry. Also, it must be admitted, they had streaks of dishonesty. Partly by rustling unbranded colts and partly by business-like methods they accumulated a large horse herd on their ranch in the Little Rockies and became quite wealthy as horsemen in that part of the country are reckoned. About them clustered a number of wild young spirits, and presently they conceived the idea that they had some sort of divine right to rule the whole country.

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About this time the little town of Landusky spring up in the Little Rocky district, a town far from railroads and telegraphs, as it remains to-day. Pike Landusky was the ruling spirit there, and he being of fighting Kansas-Missouri stock himself, and a quarrelsome sort of fellow, resented the Curry rule, The feud grew until blood was demanded on both sides. One day in January, 1894, Kid Curry, the youngest of the trio, went into a saloon in Landusky. The story goes that Landusky attempted to draw his gun, but the Kid, with the marvelous dexterity for which he is noted, seeing the attempt, drew his own gun and killed Landusky. The case is spoken of as one in which a man was killed after he got the drop on another.

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At once Kid, or Harvey, to give him his proper name, fled. It was rumored that he had gone to South Africa, but this was an error. He went, it is believed, to Wyoming, where he had been before. He roamed about a good deal, and at one time was located in the Hole-in-the-Wall country, which has sheltered so many criminals and found an apt pupil.

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Johnny and Lonnie Curry remained about the Little Rockies and renewed an old quarrel with Jew Jake. Jake is a well-known character in Northern Montana. About 10 years ago he was living in Great Falls, and one day went on an excursion to Nelhart, then a new camp. Bob Pontet was city marshal of the Falls at that time and was on the train. The two had a row. When Pontet tried to arrest Jake the latter resisted and they began firing at each other on the train. Scattering bullets wounded several people, including some children, and one bullet went through Jake's hip, necessitating the amputation of he leg. Jake was punished further by being sent to the penitentiary. When he got out he went to Landusky and opened a saloon and heartily entered into a quarrel with the Curry boys that had started before he went to the penitentiary.

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Johnny and Lonnie, when they had nothing else to do, used to go into Landusky and bombard the old man's place. One time they kept him in a state of siege for several days. Jake, on the other hand, always traveled abroad with a sawed off double-barreled shotgun, looking for the boys, but neither side ever made a killing.

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After the Kid killed Pike Landusky, Johnny Curry took up with the Widow Landusky. She and a man named Winters were contesting title to a ranch, which she wanted to give to Johnny, but Winters had taken forcible possession, and refused to be ousted. Johnny, who, by the way, was one-armed, rode out one day and told Winters to get off the ranch within a specified period or he would kill him. At the expiration of the period Johnny rode to the ranch and called Winters out. The latter came unarmed. Johnny then put into practice a favorite trick of his. Putting his reins in his mouth he opened fire on Winters with his gun held in his one hand. Johnny was riding a green horse that was not properly educated in the trick. It grew restive under fire and refused to stand still. This gave Winters time to reach down for his double-barreled shotgun and empty the contents of both barrels in Johnny's chest, killing him instantly. This was the first break in the trio. Winters was never arrested.

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Lonnie came next. He had become enamored of an outlaw's life and roamed up and down the country, living a free and easy life. Last year he, with Bob Lee and Kid Curry, held up the Union Pacific train at Wilcox, Wyo. Sheriff Hogan pursued them, but they killed him and got away into Hole-in-the-Wall country. Some months after Lonnie, with Lee, under the alias of Bobby Curry, opened a saloon at Harlem, in this state. They attempted to realize on one of the drafts stolen from the Union Pacific train through the bank at Forty Benton. This led to the discovery of their whereabouts. They got wind of impending trouble, sold the saloon for a song and fled. Lonnie could not cover up his tracks and was traced to Dodson, Mo., near his old home. He was surrounded while visiting his sweetheart. He tried to escape through the back yard, but when he found the escape fruitless, he opened fire on the officers and was killed by them.

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It was not many months before this that Lonnie had turned over the large horse herd belonging to himself and the Kid to Bob Thornhill, who now has the horses in the Missouri valley on the ranch below the breaks.

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Kid Curry has a number of peculiarities. For one thing he is known through Northern Montana as the best roper of cattle ever seen on those ranges. His work with the rope is said to be a marvel of accuracy. He is an admirable horseman, but is desperately afraid of a bucking horse, a trait in his character for which no one has ever been able to account. It is told of him that once while staying at a ranch in Wyoming he, out of gallantry, offered his horse, a beautiful and gentle animal, to the belle of the countryside to ride to a dance. After he had done so he made the awful discovery that that there was not another gentle horse in the corral. He tried to beg a horse from the other cowboys, but they heartlessly refused. In terror lest the girl should hear of his seeming cowardice, the Kid meekly accepted the glass-eyed, biting, fighting pinto bronco that was loaned him. The beast made him ride for all he was worth. He arrived at the dance pale and nearly exhausted, and a few days after he left the country, so keen was his mortification.

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Kid Curry is fond of dress and his taste in that direction is rather flashy. He is absolutely reckless and careless, and since he has been an outlaw has been known to take the most desperate chances. No one who knows him believes he will ever be taken alive. A dead shot with a revolver and rifle, he will be a hard man to capture.

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The identity of the third man has been guessed at by every man who is working on the case, and there are many guesses. Billy Pinkerton says he has information that he is a half-breed. Others think he is a man who worked for George Cunningham, the man whose horse was shot out from under him by the robbers. This man was seen on the morning of the robbery leading horses seen near the scene of the robbery, and since then he has disappeared. It is reported he is on a big drunk in Havre, but many people believe he was engaged in the affair.

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Charles Jones is another man suspected, and the authorities incline strongly to the belief that he is the man wanted. Jones was one of the men engaged in the robbery of the Northern Pacific train at Gray Cliff, below Livingston, this state, about seven years ago, and in the subsequent killings in evading arrest. His accomplices in the crime were all killed by the posse near Kallspell, far across the state from the scene of the crime. Jones was convicted of murder and sentenced to hang for his part in the killing in resisting arrest. The supreme court granted a new trial and he got off with a sentence of 10 years. May 10 last he was released, after serving six years and four months, the other time being cut off for good behavior.

--The Anaconda Standard, July 14 1901.

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70 miles from the robbery, William Jackson, who knew Logan, encountered the robbers, was greeted by Logan, and noted that one of them had a bandaged head, suggesting he had been shot and hit by Sheriff Griffith. Logan also spotted hotel owner Jack Ellis and asked him to misdirect the pursuing posse, which was only a few miles behind them. (San Francisco Chronicle, July 6, 1901 and the Anaconda Standard, July 8, 1901.)

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A cow puncher riding north from the Missouri river met three of the bandits about 70 miles north of Malta. They asked the cow puncher to notify men following them that they were going south. The cow puncher had only gone about four miles when he met Sheriff Griffith with a posse of 45 men, compromising the best gun men in eastern Montana. They were only about eight miles behind the robbers.

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The posse is growing larger constantly and their horses are being changed frequently. The cow puncher said the third man in the party had a bandage around his head. This was probably caused by one of the two shots fired by Sheriff Griffith, who was on the train.

--The San Bernardino County Sun, July 6, 1901.

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This was the last true Wild Bunch robbery, and the first sign of Harvey Logan after a mysterious three-month absence.

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A saloon girl named "Latrine Liz," said to have been friendly with Sundance and Logan, may have played a support role in the robbery. (The Anaconda Standard, July 8, 1901.) A 4th person was reportedly seen watching horses across the river, which may have been Laura Bullion or another confederate of the gang. (The Anaconda Standard, July 4, 1901.)

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Soon after the robbery, according to Brown Waller, a woman rented a rig in Glasgow, drove through a rainstorm, walked to Tampico, took a train to Hindsdale, obtained a buggy, drove to a coulee near the Walsh ranch, and dug up a cache of money from the robbery. I have no idea where he obtained this claim from, but if true, the woman would have to have been Laura Bullion (if not the enigmatic "Latrine Liz.).

(  July 5. The robbers may have traded/purchased new horses at the Morton sheep ranch on the Little Porcupine Creek.

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A rancher in Valley county, Mt.,claimed to have met the robbers who told him to pass on to the posses that they were well and happy (The New York Tribune, July 6, 1901),.

Three men on exhausted mounts showed up at the ranch, claiming they were trailing horse thieves. They exchanged their own horses and $100 in unsigned Malta bills for fresh mounts, and continued on their way.
July 7. William Pinkerton quoted as claiming Sundance was nicknamed "Long Bob." (Chicago Inter Ocean, July 7, 1901.)    
July 10. William Ellis, a rancher near the Little Rockies who knew Logan, runs into him and his two partners on a trail, and is greeted by Logan. He notes that one of the other men had dried blood on his cheek.    
July 14. Three men answering the description of the Malta robbers spent the night at the Benton stage station.   All were tired and took turns sleeping and watching. One of them looked like a "half-breed" (Logan), and was reported to be sick. They left at 4 AM, looking for some location along the Missouri river (presumably to cross). (Maysville, Ky., Daily Ledger, July 26, 1901.) Frank Lamb claimed the robbers took a boat to an island in the center of the river (Smokov speculates Cow island if the tale is true) and hid there for two boring weeks before splitting up.

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WAGNER TRAIN ROBBERS

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Three Men Answering Their Description Stopped Five Hours at the Benton Stage Station.

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Three men answering the descriptions of the Wagner train robbers stopped five hours at the Benton Stage station on Sunday July 14. They left at 4 a.m., going south. They had a pack horse and three saddle horses. All were tired, and said they had been looking for a location along the Missouri river. They took their turns sleeping and watching, and one looking like a half breed, was sick.

--Maysville, Ky., Daily Ledger, July 26, 1901.

July 16. While Sheriff Griffith and much of the posse decide to give up the chase, under sheriff Crawford of Choteau county, detective Callahan, Stock Inspector Lund, and several other men decide to strike out the next morning for Cow Island and the badlands, in one last hunt for the robbers. (The Anaconda Standard, July 17, 1901.)   If Cow Island was the spot where the robbers were holed up, the posse should have encountered them unless they were well hidden or spotted them and managed yet another escape.
July 26. Harvey Logan shoots Jim Winters in retaliation for Johnnie’s shooting.   Logan, hiding with a Winchester, shot Winters twice as he came outside to wash up. Abe Gill, Winters’ stepbrother (or some students according to Gary Wilson), came out and saw a fleeing figure.

Week of Aug. 25. Tom O'Day is arrested in Thermopolis for allegedly robbing two South Dakota men near the old D ranch. (Cheyenne Daily Leader Sep. 3, 1901.)    
Mid-September. Harvey Logan and Annie Rogers stay in Mena, Ar.

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"Deaf Charley" Hanks checks into a tenant house and saloon on College street in Nashville (possibly under the name of William Parkey)

   
Sep. 18-25. Harvey Logan and Annie Rogers stay at the Serwich Hotel in Shreveport, La.    
October. Somewhere in this time period, Ben Kilpatrick meets Laura Bullion.

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Butch and Sundance register their brands with the territorial government in Rawson.

  One legend has it that he "won" her in a poker or dice game. 
Oct. 8. Harvey Logan and Annie Rogers stay at the Linck Hotel in Nashville.    
Oct. 10. Logan and Rogers depart for Nashville.    
Oct. 14. Annie Rogers arrested after trying to pass stolen banknotes.    
Oct. 26. "Deaf Charley" Hanks is nearly caught in Nashville, making an exciting escape from police.   At some point during the escape, dogs were set on his trail, and Charley shot and killed two of them. (The Anaconda Standard, Nov. 7, 1901.)

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DESPERATE ESCAPE

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Suspected Criminal at Nashville Fight

Way Through Line of Officers, Tires

Horses and Kills Blood Hounds

in a Thrilling Flight

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Nashville, Tenn., Oct. 28. A desperate man fought his way clear of two city detectives here and after a thrilling chase made good his escape. In his race for liberty he utilized a two-horse wagon team, a horse and buggy and a riding horse, all forcibly taken, while two dead blood hounds mark the first portion of his trail.

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Officers believe the man is one of the gang that held up the Great Northern express near Wagner, Mont., last June, his attempt to get change for a $20 bill of the series secured in the robbery attracting the attention of the police to him.

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At 10:30 in the morning a raw boned man about five feet ten inches high, with florid complexion, offered the bill in payment of a small purchase made at a store on the public square. Difficulty in making the change caused the salesman to closely notice the bill which proved to be on the Montana bank to which the stolen bills were consigned.

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The police were quietly notified, the clerk meanwhile delayed the matter of change.

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Detectives Dwyer and Dickens were soon on hand and approaching the man demanded his name.

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"Ferguson" was the reply and after another question or two Detective Dwyer informed the man he was under arrest.

Quick as a flash Ferguson had a revolver in each hand and started for the door. A hand-to-hand fight ensued, both officers grappling with the stranger who proved more than a match for them. Using his pistols as clubs he fought his way to the door and fled down the street.

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A passing ice wagon caught his attention and the three Negro occupants were soon out of his way. Then at a terrific clip, the wagon was headed across the Cumberland river bridge into East Nashville, a fusillade of shots following it.

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Out Woodland street went the flying team but a sudden turn into First street, brought it to grief. One of the horses fell and broke his leg, but the fugitive was not to be delayed. Running across First street, he held up an old negro who was driving by in a buggy and the flight continued. Out on the commons he sped.

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Once the buggy overturned but quickly righted. Finally the tired horse was abandoned and after a dive into Shelby Park on foot, the supposed bandit secured another horse, hitched at a point near the park. Then after a sensational ride the horse was left and the fight continued on foot. Further out the pursuers found two of the bloodhounds used in the chase shot to death a short distance apart, and after that the trace of the man was lost.

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When the buggy was abandoned the man threw away a wallet containing $1,040 in ten and twenty dollar bills, of the Montana bank. Chief of Police Curran now has the money.

The Plymouth Tribune, Oct. 31, 1901.

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Fights His Way to Liberty

Nashville Tenn. Oct. 28 . A desperate man, George Parker alias Butch Cassity, cowboy, murderer. and train robber wanted for complicity in the great Northern $83000 express robbery at Wagner, Mont., escaped from the very clutches of the law this morning and the chase after the fleeing desperado makes up one of the most exciting days in the history of the Nashville police department. News of the thrilling dash of the bandit spread through the city in a very few minutes and it was not long until many citizens armed with pistols rifles and shotguns joined Chief of Police Curran and Sheriff Hurt and their men in an effort to apprehend the man but as the case stands he outwitted them all. He went to the Newman Co. dry goods store and after making small purchases presented a $50 bill in payment. It was found that the bill was one of those stolen from the express train. A telephone message was sent to the police and the bandit was detained. Detective Dwyer and Dickens responded. Detective Dwyer asked the man his name to which he responded, giving the name of Ferguson.

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"We are officers and you are under arrest," said Dwyer at the same time, placing his hand on the man's shoulder.

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Quick as a flash, without uttering a word and before the officers could pull their pistols, the prisoner with both hands threw back his coat and jerked from their holsters a brace of forty five caliber pistols holding them in either hand, commanding the officers to permit him to pass them. Dwyer had his pistol while the other officer had his pocket "billy" filled with shot. They grabbed the prisoner from each side and a desperate hand-to-hand encounter followed in which neither of the three men had a chance to use a pistol. Dickens brought his billy into play up on the head of the bandit but he fought on like a demon. For three minutes the three men struggled in a small space near the foot of the store only a few feet from the door. In some unaccountable manner the desperado, a man of Herculean strength, threw the officers from him and made a dash into College street.

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Before the officers could recover themselves, the man ran down the street where a large ice wagon was passing. On the wagon were three negroes. The bandit threw one pistol in the holster he wore, catching one of the horses by the bridle. He commanded the negroes to leave the wagon, stating that he needed the team. Two were on the pavement in a jiffy but one refused to give up and did not leave the driver's box until after his life had been threatened. The desperado, grabbing the reins and a big whip, jumped to the driver's seat, whipped up the horses and was off in a minute, the team going up the grade, fire-engine fashion. As the bandit drove up College street, Detective Dwyer re-opened fire on the fugitive and missed. The desperado proceeded on his way to the Cumberland river bridge applying the lash to the steeds at their every jump. The wagon swayed to and fro as it went over the bridge, narrowly escaping a collision with other vehicles. In the flying ride the desperado lost his hat. With coolness and deliberation, the bandit decided upon his next move. He was certain he was being pursued by two and perhaps a dozen officers and citizens down Bridge avenue. At the corner of First street he noticed a buggy with a good looking bay horse attached. His brain acted quickly. The ice wagon team was slow hitched to a cumbersome wagon. This team could not stand the race against more fleet footed animals and the driver decided to abandon the vehicle. He threw the horses, killing one and leaping from the wagon marked with four bullet holes, leaving a trace of blood behind on the seat, he told a negro who was standing near by to take charge of the team. Again he showed rare presence of mind. Running across the street he held up an old negro who was driving the bay horse which belonged to Maj. M. J. Dodson. After securing the Dodson rig the bandit drove on at a frightful rate. Across the rough fields he went to a saw mill near the river, passing across several gullies where telephone poles are trimmed for use. There were several hundred of these poles. The bandit did not falter for an instant when he found himself hemmed in but whipped up the faithful steed and sent him in a mad dash over the timber, buggy and all. Some of the poles were a foot or two apart but he did not mind this, his only thought being to bush the horse along in the sensational drive for liberty. Leaving the pole yard he came to a fence. He hesitated a moment and then tore down a section driving through without stopping for an instant. The buggy turned over but the next instant it was set aright. The horse was whipped up and again was sent across the country at a gallop stopping not for wire fences or other obstructions The horse was tiring and to stay with him would mean arrest. Abandonment gave hope, so jumping from the buggy which had remained intact during the long, hazardous drive. he started through section of Shelby Park on foot.

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The bandit noticed a horse tied near the river. He cut the hitch strap, mounted the horse bareback, and again started off in a gallop. The ride for the next few hundred yards was as sensational as the trip across the telephone poles. This time the animal had to jump through wire fences and over gullies and ravines anywhere from ten to fifteen feet deep. At last he was stalled in a triangular wire fence with a thirty foot gully a few feet ahead. The animal was then abandoned by the fugitive.

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The man was being closely pursued by Detective Dwyer and Patrolman W. H. Giger, and several shots were tried by the officers and the bandit when last seen was going due east. Penitentiary bloodhounds were put on the trail but the path had been traversed by officers and they could not track him.

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Capt. Henry Curran all available policeman and Sheriff Hurt and his men along with several Constables were all in the chase by this time. When he abandoned the buggy, fearing he should be apprehended, perhaps, he threw a wallet bulging with greenbacks in the air. Capt. Curran now has the money, $1200 in $10 and $20 bills of the Bank of Montana in his possession. They answer the description of the stolen money in every detail. When last seen, the man was bleeding at the head perhaps from a pistol wound but more probably from the effect of the clubbing he received from Detective Dickens at the Newman store.

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In all probability he is in league with Anna Rogers alias Maudie Williams and has been here since the time of her arrest. Following the trial of the woman a story was afloat that three men, confederates of the woman, were present at the trial. The police investigated but failed to discover anything. Perhaps the story was true. Telegrams have been sent all over the country, especially to the surrounding towns, to be on the lookout for the fugitive. Several hundred people assisted the officers today, scouring the country. An effort was made to locate Supt. Gaylor of the Pinkerton Agency at Chicago who left here Friday night. He is now in the South at work on the case.

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The fugitive is regarded as one of the most desperate criminals in the West. He is known in criminal records as a bank robber, highwayman, cattle and horse thief, as well as train robber. He has served a term in the Wyoming State penitentiary for grand larceny but was pardoned January l9, 1896.

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At midnight the police and county officers had found no trace of the fugitive, and it is believed he has made his escape.

-- The Adair County News, Nov. 6, 1901.

Nov. 1. Ben Kilpatrick and Laura Bullion arrive in St. Louis and check into the Laclede hotel. Kilpatrick is arrested at a St. Louis cathouse the next day, and Laura Bullion the following morning after passing stolen banknotes from the Wagner robbery.

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Sundance signs a legal document as witness in Chubut.

  When Laura Bullion was arrested, she was wearing a cheap, tailor-made tan dress, a white fedora, two cheap jeweled hat pins, black shoes, and an opal ring on her left hand. (The Anaconda Standard, Nov. 7, 1901.)

She was also smoking a cigarette.

Nov. 7. Laura Bullion "practically acknowledged that she had been a member of a gang of robbers for several years" to Chief Desmond under questioning, then fainted. (The Cincinnati Enquirer, Nov. 8, 1901.)    
Oct. 19. The Anaconda Standard reports that Ben Kilpatrick admits shooting Oliver Thornton in order to save his brother, whom Thornton allegedly was ready to fire on.   According to the Billings Gazette, Nov. 19, 1901, Thornton had a pistol leveled on Kilpatrick's brother (presumably Felix) when Kilpatrick shot him.
Dec. 4. Callie hunt, after being abandoned by Will Carver, gives an interview with the Pinkertons, informing on the gang.  

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Dec. 9. Harvey Logan began staying in Lilian Sartain's room at the Central Bar with she and Mayme Edington.  
Dec. 11. Tom Nixon, of the Bank of Winnemucca, identifies Ben Kilpatrick as one of the robbers. (Noted in Arizona Republican, Dec. 12, 1901.)   Nixon was a horrible eyewitness--first he seemed to describe Logan, then he mistook Kilpatrick for Sundance.
Dec. 12. Laura Bullion sentenced to five years, and Ben Kilpatrick to 15 years, for their parts in passing stolen banknotes.    
Dec. 13. Harvey Logan gets into a legendary fight in a pool hall, escapes out a back door and falls 20 feet to the ground. He is captured several days later in Jefferson City.   Logan was playing pool Patrick Sullivan's Saloon (Ike Jones' saloon) with Luther Brady and Jim Boley when he got into an argument. Logan began to strangle Brady and when Boley tried to help, he continued choking Brady with one hand and shot Boley with the other. Then he proceeded to clean out the rest of the establishment, when two police officers arrived and broke billy clubs over his head. He shot both, then fled, falling 20 feet down onto a railroad cut, injuring his ankle, but escaping. He left behind a blue coat and a hat.
Dec. 20. Over 1,000 people are counted visiting the jail to get a glimpse of Logan.   For a time, he is treated like a celebrity, but after Christmas and a mysterious letter, he tired of being gawked at and hid under a blanket. 

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1902

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

January. The Pinkertons first use the term “Wild Bunch” in a letter to the Union Pacific.   While some think the gang never referred to themselves by this moniker, rediscovered writings of Logan's from the Montana Historical Society show Logan himself affirmed the gang called itself that over the "Train Robbers Syndicate."
Jan. 16. Union Pacific Chief of Detectives W. T. Canada and Marshal Hadsell of Cheyenne meet with Harvey Logan in jail.    
Jan. 21. Harvey Logan indicted for Attempted Murder and other charges.    
March 3. Etta and Sundance sail on the SS Soldier Prince from Buenos Aires to New York City for a visit to the States. The Pinkertons claim she is homesick and visiting her family.   Butch, meanwhile, went to Bahia Blanca and Rawson by sea to purchase mules, wagons and supplies for Cholila.

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During the trip, Sundance sends a letter home from a Chicago hospital.

April 3. Etta and Sundance register at Mrs. Mary Thompson’s rooming house at #17 East 15th street, New York. Together, they tour Coney Island, and visit family in Atlantic City, New Jersey. About the same time, Butch is filing papers in Argentina.  
April 5. "Deaf Charley" Hanks shot and killed by "Pink" Taylor and two other deputies in a San Antonio cathouse.   Hanks shot and hit Taylor in the gut, but his belt buckle stopped the bullet. Eighteen $20 bills from the robbery were found on him. (The San Angelo Press, April 23, 1902, claims over $400 in $10 and $20 bills from the robbery.) A few days later, the deputies put in for the $1250 reward.

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Harvey, Hughes and myself entered the room bunched up together, Harvey slightly in front. I was prepared for trouble for before entering the room. I had removed my slx shooter from the scabbard and had stuck it into the belt of my trousers. I had on no vest and as I walked into the room kept my hands folded over my belt, my right hand resting on the butt of my gun. Just before we entered, "Red" Souter inclined his head to the right to indicate that the man was on that side of the door. When I first saw him, he was sitting just to the right of the door and not more than four feet from us. At that moment, he swung around in his chair, drawing his gun. As he did so and rising, I noticed that he pulled his hip pocket out with the gun. He fired at once, the muzzle of his weapon being almost against Harvey's stomach. Harvey and Hughes grabbed him at once. As near as I could see, Harvey had hold of his shoulder. His right hand was free. I pulled down Hughes' shoulder with my left hand and fired over it into the man's breast. All this happened within a second or two. My second shot followed the first immediately. After my second shot, the three moved to the other corner of the room All this time, the man's right hand was free and he was pointing his pistol over Hughes' shoulder at me. I pulled down on him the third time but a woman [Lilly West or Mattie Freeman, the two soiled doves working that night] got in range behind him and I was afraid to shoot. A moment later they moved, and I fired the third time. That was the bullet that hit him in the head.

.

I want to make it clear that the man's gun was pointed at me all the time after the first shot. Of course, I know now why he didn't shoot, but I had no way of knowing then that he would not fire at me. I know now that he didn't fire again because my first shot had so paralyzed him that he couldn't pull the trigger. Instinctively, he kept me covered, but the bullet through his heart had taken the strength out of him and he couldn't shoot. Neither Harvey nor Hughes had drawn their weapons and I believed then and believe now that if I din't kill him he would kill one or all of us.

--Account of "Deaf Charley's" shooting by "Pink" Taylor from the Houston Daily Post, April 24, 1902.

  May. Sundance and Etta again go to Dr. Pierce's Invalid's Hotel again. (Rumored to be for one or both having VD, though it could have been for Sundance's ongoing leg injury from a bullet or a horse falling on him.) They then go visit Sundance's family in Pennsylvania.  
May 16. Butch cashes a check for $3,546 at the Hotel del Globo at Trelew.    
June 10. Wyatt Hanks is arrested by Sheriffs Goodfellow and Irvine for passing bills from the Malta (Wagner) robbery. (The San Angelo Press. June 18, 1902.)   Jesse Nickell and Peter Fulcher were also arrested in the case.
June 18. Annie Rogers acquitted of guilt for passing bills from the Wagner robbery.    
June 25. Sundance buys a gold watch from Tiffany’s.    
  July 3. Butch (or perhaps a disguised Etta) and Sundance, possibly rob a Rock Island, Omaha and Denver Express train near Dupont, Il. However, since a man was shot with his hands up (or as he slipped and the robbers thought he was trying to run, according to other claims), this doesn't seem to be in keeping with their style.

BOLD ACT OF BANDITS.

A Chicago. Rock Island and Pacific Railway Train Is Held Up.

SCENE OF CRIME NEAR CHICAGO.

Express Messenger Kane Is Shot Through the groin by One of the Desperadoes-- One Robber captured.

Joliet, Ills. July 5. The Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific railroad's through express train No. 5, bound for Omaha and Denver, and which left Chicago at 10 p. m., was held up by robbers at Dupont. Ills., an hour later. Express Messenger Kane was shot through the groin by one of the robbers, and is in a critical condition. The local safe was forced open, but the amount of the booty secured is not known. Charles Nessler, who climbed over the tender of the engine and told the engineer and fireman to stop the train has been arrested. Nessler. however, is believed to be the unwilling accomplice of the robbers, as he obeyed their commands at the point of a revolver. The detectives are hot on the trail of the robbers. A special train is waiting at Coal City for a pair of bloodhounds which are to be rushed to the scene of the hold-up.

.

According to Nessler's story, only two robbers were concerned, though the detectives think there were more. Nessler is about 22 years old, of frank appearance and intelligence, and claims to be of respectable parents. He says he went to Niles Center recently to visit a cousin. He started home, and having no funds was beating his way, taking the train at Chicago. At Englewood they climbed on the bumpers back of the tender, and had scarcely secured this position when two men also climbed up. They said nothing in particular until Midlothian station was reached. Then one of the men climbed over the end of the tender upon the coal and ordered Nessler to follow. Both men had adjusted black masks to their faces. At the point of a revolver, Nessler was told to go forward to the cab and tell the engineerto stop the train half a mile beyond. Thoroughly frightened, he did so.

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The engineer and fireman regarded the request as a joke and laughed.

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"Look up there," said Nessler.

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The trainmen did so and saw two revolvers pointed toward them. this is no joke," said the robber. "Stop the train or I'll kill you." The engineer shut off the steam and brought the train to a standstill at Dupont switch.

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The engine crew were taken back under guard, Nessler being compelled to remain In the cab and keep quiet. Demand was made on the express messenger and baggagemen to open the door of their car under threats to blow it up with dynamite. The door was opened and the robbers rushed in. A struggle ensued and Messenger Kane was shot in the groin.

.

The robbers attempted to open the through safe, but were unsuccessful. The local safe, however, was forced open. It is not known what money was taken. It is reported that a bag of jewelry and some money was found in the safe, but railway officials say practically nothing of value was secured. The robbers disappeared.

.

Kane was taken to Linley Park for treatment, and later removed to Englewood Hospital. The police here have a satchel and a quantity dynamite found in a car near the scene of the robbery. None of the passengers were molested.

TRAIN ROBBERY.

Bandits Hold a C. R. I & P. Express near Chicago.

July 5. At the general Offices of the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific railway a dispatch was received of a daring attempt at train robbery. The dispatch is as follows: "Train No. .1, which left Chicago at 10 p. m., was held up near Durant, Ills.. 19 miles from Chicago. Express Messenger Kane was shot through the groin by one of the robbers. The bandits undertook to cut off the two front cars of the train. It is thought that there were three robbers in the party. One of them, who came under the tank and undertook to give orders to the engineer is under arrest, and has been taken to Joliet. The messenger was taken to Englewood for surgical treatment. It is not thought his injuries are fatal."

.

Engineer Goodell and Conductor Coffey were in charge of the train. The dispatch is signed by Conductor Coffey.

--The Evening Bulletin., July 5, 1902, Maysville, Ky.

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ROBBERS' TRAIL GROWS WARM.; Men Who Held Up Rock Island Express Train Seen Near Chicago -- A Posse Closing In.

CHICAGO, July 5 -- The pursuit of the robbers who held up the Omaha and Denver express on the Rock Island Road Thursday, near Dupont, narrowed down this afternoon to a search for two young men, believed to be experienced criminals, who lived in an Englewood rooming house for two weeks before the robbery.

--New York Times, July 5, 1902.

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IN PURSUIT OF BANDITS

Half a Hundred Men Are Scouring Country for the Rock Island Robbers

NO TRACE FOUND AS YET

BELIEVED DESPERATE BATTLE WILL ENSUE IF PURSUERS CATCH SIGHT OF QUARRY

EXPRESS MESSENGER KANE WILL RECOVER

Charles Nessler, Who Claims He Was Forced Into the Deal, Is Under Arrest -Goods Stolen Consist of Cheap Jewelry.

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CHICAGO, July 4.-With half a hundred men on their trail, and the promise of a desperate battle and probably death for their portion if they should be overtaken, the two bandits who halted the Rock Island railroad's Denver Limited train at midnight Thursday and escaped after seriously wounding one of the express messengers, are still at large.

..

All during the night and through today they pushed on through the farming country, stealing a buggy or a wagon here and there, and abandoning the teams when they were too exhausted to carry them farther. Farmers and residents in the little town in the vicinity of the raid swept over the surrounding fields and prairies in the hunt, but never a glimpse was had of the fugitives. Occasionally a rumor of their whereabouts was obtained, but the utmost haste in organizing a pursuit failed to overhaul them.

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Kane Will Recover.

.

James Kane, the veteran express messenger, who was shot down by the robbers while he stood with his hands elevated above his head, was brought to Chicago, and, it is believed, will recover.

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Charles Nessler, the dupe and decoy of the bandits, who was captured on the ground after they had fled, was brought from Joliet during the day by Sheriff Magerstadt, but the officers do not believe he will be of much assistance in running down the fugitives.

..

The attempt upon the strong boxes of the United States Express company that were journeying toward Omaha and Denver is admitted to have been one of the best planned raids of recent years, but it was poorly executed, and the bandits tried to carry out the programme without sufficient force to protect themselves from an attack.

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Looking for Big Money.

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The detectives engaged in the investigation and the pursuit now being pushed all over Illinois are satisfied that the robbers hoped to force the big safe which contained somewhere in the neighborhood of $90,000, and only the precipitate shooting of the messenger defeated them in this project. When they fled they carried with them several packages of cheap jewelry, valued at about $300, and a quantity of catalogues and patent medicine bottles, which they apparently thought were bundles of valuables.

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General Agent Wygant, of the United States Express company, says that the robbers secured less than $150.

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Kane Is an Old Messenger.

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OMAHA, Neb., July 4.-Express Messenger Kane, who was shot during the hold-up on the Rock Island road at Joliet last night, lived in Omaha, and was well known there. The train arrived in this city considerably behind time. Passengers on the train, with few exceptions, knew nothing of the affair until after it was over. Several Omaha banks, for whom consignments of money were carried, report the safe arrival of their currency.

--The Saint Paul Globe, July 5, 1902.

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--The Saint Paul Globe, July 5, 1902.

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"KID" CURRY'S GANG.

Believed That They Held Up the Rock Island Xpress.

.

Chicago (Special). That members of the "Kid" Curry band of bank and train robbers, wanted for alleged complicity in the recent Union Pacific holdup, perpetrated the robbery of the Rock Island express train at Dupont, Il., is believed probable by detectives, 100 of whom are working on the case.

..

Charles Nessler, the boy who was stealing a ride on the train when it was stopped, described the men to detectives and his description is said to tally with photographs and descriptions of "Butch" Cassidy and the "Sundance Kid," alias Harry Longbaugh, alleged members of the Kid Curry gang. It was officially stated by an officer of the United States Express Company that the robbers secured only $50 worth of jewelry.

..

They carried away a package of worthless vouchers and other papers, but overlooked a package containing $100,000.

--The Fulton County news., July 10, 1902. 

  July 4. Butch Cassidy is supposedly seen celebrating in Salt Lake by a reporter.  
July 5 (approx.). An elderly couple, a young married couple and an 11-year-old girl found dying of thirst in the desert are taken to the Bassett ranch for recovery. (Colorado Springs Weekly Gazette, July 17, 1902.)    
July 10. Etta and Sundance sail to Buenos Aires aboard the Honorius from New York, working as a purser and stewardess.    
July 29. First notation from the Pinkertons that Butch and Sundance are in South America.   They had to know earlier. They may have been clued in when they intercepted the DeYoung photo from Sundance's sister if he made any mention of their upcoming departure in 1901.
Sep. 20. E. J. Harrison, at whose restaurant Harvey Logan had been boarding before his arrest, brings packages of pipes and tobacco to the Knoxville jail, inside one of which is hidden a 23" hacksaw blade. Harrison claims the packages came to him in the mail, but is arrested.    
Aug. 9. Etta and Sundance register at the Hotel Europa in Buenos Aires.    
Aug. 10. Butch details their livestock holdings in a letter to Matilda Davis (Elza’s mother-in-law) back in Utah.      
Aug. 15. Etta and Sundance sail up the coast on the SS Chubut, then ride the rest of the way to their ranch.     
Aug. 14. Sundance closes out his bank account in Buenos Aires.    
Aug. 15. Etta and Sundance sail up the coast on the SS Chubut, then ride the rest of the way to their ranch.    
Oct. 31. Boone Kilpatrick is arrested in Ozona, Tx., for passing stolen banknotes from the Wagner robbery. (Omaha Daily Bee, Nov. 1, 1902.)   I have not been able to find a disposition of the case, but he was selling cattle by January.

Nov. 22. Harvey Logan found guilty of 10 counts of robbery.    
Nov.30. The Sixth U.S. Circuit Court sentences Logan to 20 years of hard labor.     
November. Logan shoots a letter to Edward Hanlon out of his cell by using a rubber band. A note on the envelope asks the finder to mail it..   

The letter was sent to Ed Hanlon, who reported it to the press.

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LETTER FROM CURRY.

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North Montana Man Claims to Have a Missive From the Desperado.

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Edward Hanlon, an old friend of Kid Carry's, who resides in the Little Rockies, has received a letter from the train robber.

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The letter is written in pencil, in bold hand, and its contents mirror daring character of the writer. Curry states that he managed to get the letter out of the jail in the following unique manner:

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With an ordinary rubber band he bound the missive into a small wad and with another band shot it through the bars into the street as a small boy would shoot a stone in a flip. On the back of the envelope he wrote the words, "Please mail this letter, and the supposition is that it was picked up by some pedestrian, who mailed it in accordance with the written request.

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"I will get out of this scrape yet," writes the most desperate criminal since the days of Jesse James. "I will show those people that they are not fooling with a soft thing. They call me the Napoleon of Crime, and you should see how they flock to see me when the trial is on.

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And when I get out of this, Ed, look out for me. They talk about Harry Tracy, but if I don't give 'em a better run for their money than that dub Tracy, then my right name is not Harvey Logan. I'll cut my way through h--1 before they'll take me again.

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I am now waiting for my sentence. It'll be a light one for the people here are with me and I've got all sorts of friends. Well, good-bye, old friend. It won't be so long before I'm back in Montana, and when I am, there'll be hell to pay.

--Fergus County Argus, Dec. 3, 1902. 

     

.

.

1903

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

  1903. Some time during the year, Butch and Sundance may have caught and killed a Pinkerton agent, burying the body, which Etta's dog later dug up while guests were dining with them.  
1903. The Pinkertons claim Etta and Sundance were seen in Baggs, Wy.    
January. Ann Bassett returns home.    
Jan. 9. General Manager D. S. Elliott, Messenger C. H. Smith and Fireman F. W. O'Neill identify Harvey Logan as one of the Wagner robbers.    
Feb. 21. In Thermopolis, Tom O'Day is shot in the face and wounded by Louis Bagby over an argument dealing with a racehorse.  

CATCHES A BAD MAN NAPPING

.

Business Man of Thermopolis Takes Four Shots at Tom O'Day and Lands One.

.

THERMOPOLIS, Wyo., Feb. 21. (Special Telegram.) Tom O'Day, notorious bad man, was wounded in a fight here today with a citizen and for the first time in his checkered career he received a bullet, although he has been fired at no less than 300 or 400 times. O'Day quarreled with Louis Bagby, a local business man, over the handling of one of O'Day's racehorses.

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Bagby palled a six-shooter and fired four shots at O'Day point blank. The first shot took effect in O'Day's left cheek, but the others went wild.

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O'Day for the first time in many years was unarmed, having left his gun in an adjoining room, but he attacked Bagby and drove him from the house. He afterwards appeared and paid a fine. Bagby was arrested, charged with assault with intent to kill. O'Day was for years a member of the Currie gang. He was tried for complicity in the Belle Fourche bank robbery, but was acquitted. He is a big man, of iron nerve, a crack shot.

--Omaha Daily Bee, Feb. 22, 1903.

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QUEER WEAPONS USED BY BRAVE O'DAY WHEN SHOT

.

Thermopolis, Wyo., Feb. 21.--Tom O'Day, who was tried and acquitted on a charge of robbing the Bridger, Mont., bank, and who is widely known as a man of reckless courage, was this morning wounded in a fight with Louis Bagby, a business man, but routed his assailant, in spite of the fact that he carried no weapons.

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O'Day is the owner of a race horse and Bagby has been taking care of the animal for him. At breakfast O'Day accused Bagby of misusing the horse. Bagby was enraged by the charge and, whipping out a six shooter, shot O'Day through the face, inflicting a serious wound. O'Day sprang to his feet and Bagby continued firing until four bullets left his gun. Though unarmed, O'Day made no attempt to escape, but seized cups and plates from the table and rained them on Bagby. Bagby took to his legs, followed by O'Day, but escaped down the street.

.

Without waiting for attention to his wound, O'Day went to the office of the Justice of the Peace and gave himself up, offering to pay a fine for disturbing the peace. The Justice refused to consider his proposition, believing that O'Day was right in the quarrel. Bagby has not yet been arrested, but will probably be so before the excitement caused by the fight quiets down.

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O'Day's action in fighting, unarmed, an armed man is in accordance with his reputation. He is said to be absolutely fearless, and to have at one time been a member of the celebrated Curry gang. He has been shot at no less than 400 times during his career.

--Wyoming Tribune, Feb. 22, 1903.

March. Etta, Butch and Sundance visit Gaiman and Trelew on the coast of Argentina.    
  March 17. Frank Dimaio claimed he received a cable from the Pinkerton offices instructing him to take Etta, Butch and Sundance into custody, which specifically named Etta Place by the name "Etta." Proof of this cable is lacking both in the Pinkerton archives and Dimaio's own notes from the era, and Dan Buck believes his memory was faulty.
Summer. Pinkerton agent, Martin Sheffields, tracks Butch and Sundance down, decides he likes them, and cuts a deal to remain silent about them in return for some amount of cash.     
June 27. Harvey Logan makes a spectacular escape from the Knoxville Jail, galloping down Prince Street, right onto Hill Street, and right onto Gay. He was last seen galloping across the Tennessee River on what would later be known as the Gay Street Bridge. An $8,000 bribe possibly aided in his escape. At this point, conflicting sightings of Logan begin to emerge. Most modern historians believe he rode with Sam Adkins for North Carolina, and hid out there.

.

The source for this is a cousin of Adkins.

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But another report by his attorney and a relative of Sheriff Fox has him in Georgia and later in Kentucky, while the story around Logan's lost writings has it that he departed for Kansas City with a relative after hiding in Knoxville for two weeks.

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If the either the claim by his attorney or family is legitimate, it demolishes the Adkins scenario.

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Whatever the case, Logan eventually headed for Montana, and wound up in Texas.

June 28. Sheriff J. W. Fox's faithful steed, stolen by Harvey Logan during the escape, wanders back lame to the Knoxville jail on its own after being run out of a corm patch by a black family.    
July. "Driftwood Jim" McCloud, a friend of Tom O'Day's, is arrested for the February murder of young sheepherder Ben Minnick near Thermopolis, Wy.   There had been ongoing bad blood between cattlemen and sheepmen, and after a lynch mob broke into and shot two murderers in the Basin City jail on the 19th, Sheriff Fenton called for reinforcements to help transfer McCloud there.
July 4. Logan attorney, L. C. Houck, reportedly meets with Harvey Logan in Atlanta.  

TALKED WITH HARVEY LOGAN.

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Knoxville Attorney Says He Met the Escaped Bandit.

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Knoxville. Tenn., July 9. A letter received here today from L. C. Houck, an attorney of this city, who is now at Lithia Springs, Ga., states that he saw and conversed with Harvey Logan last Saturday. He states further that Logan enjoined him to say nothing about meeting until five days had elapsed. He inferred from Logan's conversation that he proposed to sail for a foreign country. Logan is the Montana train robber who escaped from the Knox County Jail, June 27.

--The St. Louis Republic, July 10, 1903. (The Guthrie Daily Leader states it was in Atlanta, however another section of the July 10 Republic says: A Knoxville attorney writes to friends in the Tennessee city telling them that he met and conversed with Harvey Logan, the escaped train robber convict, last Saturday at Lithia Springs. Ga. He says he did not tell of it sooner because Logan enjoined him to say nothing of the meeting for five days.)

  July 12. A cousin of Sam Adkins, named Melton, claims he gave a canoe ride to Adkins and another man believed to be Harvey Logan, ferrying them from Tennessee into North Carolina. They then made camp atop a mountain but disappeared after only a few days.  The party searched the wilds in the extreme western part of the state where Logan was supposed to have taken refuge. With the exception of one man--old man Melton--who said he furnished the fugitive and a pal with food, no trace of the bandit was found, and the officers have come to the conclusion that if he ever was there, he is there no longer. The only evidence to support the theory he has ever been hiding in that country is the story of Melton, and this some of the officers are inclined to doubt.

--Statesville Record and Landmark, July 31, 1903.

July 15. Two men in Red Oak, Ky., believe they recognize a stranger as Harvey Logan and attempt to arrest him, but the stranger shoots both, and makes his escape.  

HARVEY LOGAN.

.

He Shot Two Men Who Attempted to Arrest Him.

S.

Adairvlle, Ky., July 15. It is reported that a stranger made his appearance near Red Oak Tuesday and was recognized by Russell Ellis and Ernest Fox as Harvey Logan. They procured weapons and attempted his arrest. A battle ensued, but Logan was too quick for them. Ellis was shot through the chest and Fox was wounded in the head. Three shots were effective. Logan made good his escape. Logan is the bank robber who recently escaped from prison in Knoxville.

--The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Ky. July 15, 1903.

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Fox (the Cincinnati Enquirer, July 15, 1903) claimed to be the son of a Knoxville attorney and relative of Sheriff Fox, that he had been to the trial and seen Logan personally, so that was how he recognized him! Apart from the stranger's being good with a gun vs. two opponents, this report could also be credible because of a separate report from a man in an August newspaper account, who also reported talking to Logan in Kentucky. These two, taken with the report of Logan's lawyer's that he consulted with him on July 4 when Logan is supposed to have been on the run with Sam Adkins, are a death blow to the claim he was hiding in North Carolina with Adkins.

  July 17 (approx.) Melton returns and finds that Logan and Adkins are gone.  
July 21. After Fuller sets out with a force of 90 (other reports say 40) combined militia and deputies, Tom O'Day and a large group of men are spotted on Cottonwood creek, six miles from Thermopolis, waiting to free McCloud. In the face of such large opposition, the band gave up the plan.   McCloud was never charged with the murder, but was convicted of robbing a post office. He briefly escaped from jail with fellow inmate Tom Horn, but both were recaptured.

.

PRISONER'S LIFE SAVED BY OFFICERS

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Effort to Hold Up Wyoming Deputies Fails.

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CHEYENNE, Wyo., July 21.--A bloody battle was narrowly averted in the mountains six miles north of Thermopolis today, when Sheriff Fenton transferred Jim McLoud, the alleged murderer of Ben Minnick, from the city jail at Thermopolis to the county Jail at Basin. Sheriff Fenton left Thermopolis at 6 o'clock with his prisoner under the escort of the Basin Light Artillery of forty men, and fifty deputies. Armed men had been sent out at sunrise and they reported that a large force of cattlemen and the friends of McLoud were camped on the trail near Cottonwood Creek and from preparations being made they intended to hold up the Sheriff and his party and deliver the prisoner. Consequently, when Fenton left Thermopolis he went ahead, expecting a battle.

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Scouts guarded the advance, the front and the rear and either flank, but when the cattlemen saw that the soldiers were alert for battle they quietly slipped away and by making a detour carried Thermopolis. With them was Tom O'Day, the notorious character, who is alleged to have been mixed up in the killing of Minnick, and for whom Sheriff Fenton has a warrant. McLoud was at once placed in the cell formerly occupied by Walters, the condemned murderer, who was shot to death by a mob Sunday morning, and a strong guard placed about the Jail, expecting a battle.

--The San Francisco Call, July 22, 1903.

Late July? Harvey Logan reportedly seen in Kentucky by Ed Kelly, claiming he would be heading for Missoula.  

HARVEY LOGAN SAID TO BE COMING TO MONTANA

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Missoula Police Receive Letter From a Man Claiming to Be Cousin and Old Pal of the Bandit.

.

Missoula. Aug. 21--A strange letter from Knoxville, Tenn. came to Chief of Police Hollingsworth's address yesterday. The writer states that Harvey Logan, the Montana desperado who escaped from the jail in Knoxville several months ago, is now either at Missoula or a short distance away, and is coming in this direction.

.

The letter is signed by Ed Kelly, who declares that he is a pal and cousin of the famous train robber. He states that his object in telling of the whereabouts of Logan is revenge. An extract from the Letter reads: You may doubt this, but I know that Logan is either in Missoula at this writing or else is not too many miles away. I saw him at a certain place in Kentucky less than a week ago, and then he left for the Northwest. saying that he would stop in Missoula for a while. He has friends there. His object is to work there as a laborer until the excitement about his escape has subsided. Then he will go after the Great Northern and Northern Pacific trains again.

.

"I hope you can locate Logan, and that he will be sent to the pen. He promised to aid me in a certain way if I would help him to get away, but failed to stick to his word, and now I will run him down. When he left me he had on a black felt hat, brogan shoes, a gray shirt and a brown suit of clothes."

.

Chief Hollingsworth does not believe that the letter was written by a friend or relative of the escaped outlaw, but that the writer was none other than Logan himself. His theory is that Logan has returned to Knoxville and wrote the letter to throw his pursuers off the scent.

--The Butte Inter Mountain, Aug. 21, 1903.

  Aug. 3. Unknown members of the Wild Bunch may have tried to blow up a bridge and wreck a Northern Pacific train near Livingston, Mt. (Minneapolis journal, August 3, 1903.)  
Aug. 9. Bob Meeks, serving 35 years for the Montpelier robbery, escapes from a Blackfoot, Id., insane asylum, but is recaptured.    
Aug. 21. Traces of Harvey Logan are reported found at Great Falls, Mt. (The Salt Lake Herald, Aug. 22, 1903.)    
  Aug. 28. Harvey Logan and two confederates may have failed at robbing another train near Malta.  

DETECTIVES SPOIL HOLD-UP OF FLYER

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Kid Curry's Attempt to Rob Great Northern Train Frustrated by Officers.

.

HAVRE, Mont., Aug. 30. -What is supposed to have been an attempt to hold up the west bound flyer of the Great Northern by. "Kid" Curry and his gang on Friday night near Malta, it has just been learned, was only frustrated by detectives riding on the engine.

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Three suspicious looking strangers boarded the train and one climbed over the tender when they were discovered by officers who covered them with guns and ordered them off. They promptly slid off the side of the tender, disappearing in the darkness.

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For three days the train crews, mail crews and express agents on passenger trains between Glasgow and Havre have been heavily armed and a score of detectives have been riding up and down the line anticipating a holdup.

.

Several days ago the company received what they considered reliable information that Harvey Logan, alias Kid Curry, had returned to Montana and would attempt to hold up a train. The men who boarded the train at Malta Friday night were heavily armed. Malta is but a few miles from Wagner, the point where the Great Northern holdup occurred two years ago. Harvey Logan, alias Kid Curry, lives in Dodson, Mo., a. small town about eleven miles from Kansas City.

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He was the leader of the robbers who held up the Great Northern train in July, 1901, and secured $45,000 in unsigned national bank notes after dynamiting the safe. He escaped from the county jail at Knoxville, Tenn. on July 27 last, while awaiting removal to the Columbus, Ohio, penitentiary, to which he had been sentenced for twenty years after having been convicted of uttering altered bank notes - the same that had been taken from the Great Northern car. He is charged with other crimes and there is a standing reward of $1,000 for his arrest and conviction.

--The Saint Paul Globe, Aug. 31, 1903.

Sep. 13. First newspaper allusion to Tom O'day being drunk at Belle Fourche.   There were now banded together five of the most daring men Wyoming ever had within her borders, and their headquarters was at the Lost Cabin about six miles from Thermopolis.

.

From Lost Cabin they went to Belle Fourche S. D. where in broad daylight they they up and robbed the Belle Fourche bank. All the robbers escaped with the single exception of Tom O'Day who was drunk and fell off his horse and was captured. .

--Pinkerton Supt. James McParland, quoted in the Sep. 13, 1903, New York Sun.

.

This is the first possible record of the saloon claim that I can find in the papers, but he did claim this at his trial.

Sep. 15. Harvey Logan forces a Montana acquaintance to give him a horse and gear.  

"KID" CURRY IN MONTANA

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Noted Bandit and Escaped Convict Positively Identified by Men Who Know Him.

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Borrowed a Horse and Saddle to Press on North. Capture Will Not be Easy.

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Special to The Journal. Helena, Mont., Sept. 18. Harvey Logan, commonly known as Kid Curry, the noted train robber who recently effected a sensational escape from the Knoxville, Tenn., jail, while awaiting transportation to a federal prison to' serve a 20-year sentence, after having been convicted of forging signatures to the national bank notes stolen in the Great Northern train robbery at Wagner, Mont., in 1901, is again in Montana. A special from Chinook says that Curry was seen there last Tuesday. He was positively identified by men who were personally acquainted with him during the many years his gang made its rendezvous in northern Montana.

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For several weeks the state has been flooded with Pinkerton and railroad detectives who, however, had not come in close contact with Curry. He has innumerable friends in northern Montana and it is doubtful if his capture will be easily effected despite the fact that his whereabouts are now known. Curry called at the ranch of James T. Moran near Yantic, Tuesday night and enforced the loan of a horse, saddle and bridle. He informed Moran with whom he is personally acquainted, that he intended going further north. Last night the horse, bridle and saddle were returned, but by whom it is not known.

What Moran Says.

Mr. Moran in an interview said: "When Curry first appeared at the ranch, I took him for a tramp, so dilapidated was his appearance. We had a short conversation and before a dozen words had been uttered I recognized my caller. In the course of a few moments he made known his wants, the best horse, saddled and bridled, on the premises, and seeing that he was armed and knowing well his disposition, I promptly acceded to the demand. Curry told me that he had visited several Montana towns and was aware that detectives were on his trail, but gave no evidence of fear. He told me he was going further north, but did not state how far. He probably crossed the international border into Canada.

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"Twenty-four hours later the horse, bridle and saddle, were returned in a mysterious manner, so I am led to believe that Curry's professed movement to the north was a subterfuge."

-- The Minneapolis Journal, Sep, 18, 1903.

  Sep. 22. A train holdup near St. Joseph, Mo. was attributed by local authorities to Harvey Logan. It is doubtful Logan was involved.
Nov. 3. Tom O'Day is apprehended near Lost Cabin with 23 stolen CY horses.    
Nov. 20. Tom Horn is hanged for the killing of 14-year-old Willie Nickell.    
Nov. 26. The Sheriff of Casper hears that a large force of rustlers is coming down from Hole in the Wall to break Tom O'Day out of jail. (Keep in mind that Harvey Logan had escaped, and this was probably on his mind.)   He hastily deputized 150 men, and ordered O'Day shot if they assaulted the town.

DESPERADOES EXPECTED AT CASPER, WYOMING.

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Tom O'Day's Friends are Heavily Armed.

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MARCHING ON THE JAIL

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Nearly 300 Have Left "Hole in the Wall"-- Sheriff Has Sworn In 150 Extra Deputies and a Desperate Fight Is Expected--Will Shoot Prisoner Rather Than Surrender Him.

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Cheyenne, Wyo., Nov. 26. Sheriff Webb of Casper, today received a warning that between 250 and 300 heavily armed friends of Tom O'Day had left their "hole in the wall" rendezvous with the intention of raiding the Casper Jail and rescuing O'Day who was arrested a few days ago for alleged horse stealing. The sheriff at once swore in 150 extra deputies and armed them with repeating Winchesters. Tonight every road leading into Casper is patrolled by deputies and one hundred men surround the jail. Inside are others with instructions to shoot the prisoner in case the deputies outside are unable to repel an attack. The citizens of the town have armed themselves and the strength at the Sheriff's command is fully 250 men.

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The "Hole in the wall" is seventy miles from Casper and the friends of O'Day are expected to reach Casper between midnight and morning. They were last seen passing the McDonald ranch in Red Valley, on the road to Casper nine miles from the Hole.

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The attacking party is said to have been recruited from the ranks of the "bad men" of half a dozen counties and is led by Jack Smith, a notorious desperado. Foreseeing a possible repulse, the outlaws have prepared to stand a siege in the hole, which is a natural fortress.

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The first news of their approach to Casper is expected from pickets who have been stationed far out on the roads. If the Jail is attacked a sanguinary battle will result and O'Day in all probability will be shot to death or lynched.

--The Stark County Democrat, Dec. 1, 1903.

Winter. Harvey Logan stays at the Lamb ranch in Fremont county, Co.  

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1904

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

  Early 1904. A Pinkerton report claims Etta and Sundance were seen in Fort Worth.  
  Jan. 21. "Frank Jones" (Harvey Logan?) reportedly accosts a constable in Culberston, Mt., steals his horse and frees a prisoner. (The Anaconda Standard, Jan. 22, 1904.) Constable Moore, with horse thief Jack Trailer under arrest near the Jack Murphy ranch, was accosted by a man identified as "Frank Jones" (a known alias of Sundance), a well-known outlaw. "Jones" stole his horse and freed Trailer.

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Was this one of the Dixons? A mistaken identification of Harvey Logan? An outlaw really named Frank Jones? I cannot say with certainty.

February. Tom O'Day's trial for horse stealing begins.   It took three trials (and accusations of jury tampering) during the month to get a verdict and conviction. O'Day was sentenced to six years.
Feb. 29. Butch writes a letter that Sundance will be traveling to buy bulls the next day (March 1).    
  March. Logan, having hooked up with George Kilpatrick and Jack Sheffield, departs Texas, headed for the fateful robbery at Parachute.  
March 3. Under custody of US Marshal Crocker, Cousin Bob Lee arrives in Cheyenne and is jailed.    
 March 9. Etta, Butch and Sundance host a party for Gov. Lezana, who dances with Etta and spends the night (probably) in Butch’s room. .  
April. Butch is arrested for the Guillermo Imperiale robbery but is eventually released.    
  May. Etta, again using the Ackley alias, checks into a California hotel. Assuming the woman was Etta, she checked in as the spouse of the same husband listed in the hotel she was residing in at Grand Junction back in 1898 before coming down to Springville. It appears she and Sundance intended to make the opening day of the World's Fair but would miss it by a few days--or that they made it and were on their way home after a short visit. (More likely the former.)
May 24. Harvey Logan is spotted at Walt Punteney’s ranch on Bridger Creek.    
Summer. Sundance and Etta, possibly with Butch, attend the St. Louis World’s Fair, then visit family and friends. Butch may have gone to Baggs, Utah, and given Tom Vernon a set of shot glasses from the Fair, though Vernon claimed this happened in 1905. (If the story is true, Vernon was off on the year.)  
June 1. Logan, Kilpatrick and Sheffield drift into the Parachute area and under the names of J. H. Ross, John Emerling and Charles Scubbs, find work with the railroad for a few days, then work briefly at a restaurant.    
June 7. Denver & Rio Grade train robbery near Parachute, Co. Harvey Logan, using the name Tap Duncan, commits suicide after being wounded by a posse.  As the westbound Denver & Rio Grande pulled out of Parachute, Co., a man many believe to be Harvey Logan scrambled aboard and ordered the engineer to halt the train at Streit Flats, where two confederates, said to be Dan Sheffield and George Kilpatrick, awaited. After dynamiting the safe, the robbers sought to escape but wound up fighting a running gun battle with a posse consisting of Sheriff Frank Adams, Elmer Chapman , Joe Dobey, James Dooley, Rolland Gardner, and Willis Kissie.

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In their last change of horses at the Larson ranch, the matriarch, Mrs. Larson, is claimed to have tricked Logan into taking a half-blind, out-of-shape mare, which undoubtedly contributed to their being chased down.

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To the determination of one woman, a little old lady named Mrs. Larsen, the police are indebted for the death of the bandit leader. After the Denver and Rio Grande train robbery at Parachute, Col. recently, Mrs. Larsen saw a stranger trying to steal one of her horses. She knew the stranger was desperate. She knew he was taking her best horse. The only way she could prevent this was to appear sympathetic with him.

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"Want to get away in a hurry," she asked.

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"Well, I want to get away," said the stranger.

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"I thought you did, the way you were acting," said Mrs. Larsen. "Take that little mare over there in the corner. They can't catch her in a thousand years."

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The stranger took the little mare, which was half blind and spivened and hadn't done a day's work or galloped a mile in a year.

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As soon as the stranger had ridden away, Mrs. Larsen called her two sons and told them a horse thief had come and taken one of the animals from the corral. They armed themselves with carbines and started away in the direction the stranger had taken. In an hour they met a posse hunting for the Parachute train robbers. This was the undoing of Harvey Logan, alias Kid Curry.

--Charleston News & Courier, Sep. 11, 1904.

June 9. The Parachute man is shot, then commits suicide.   On the morning of the 9th, the three arrived at the Joe Banta ranch, and forced the family to give them breakfast before leaving with three of their horses. Apparently, Logan's gave out, and they wound up at the Larsen ranch, where Mrs. Larsen conned Logan (or whomever the man was) into taking the useless mare.

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Slowed by the nag, the three were finally forced into a fight at Gibson Gulch where Logan --turning his back on a target he mistakenly thought was finished off--was wounded, whereupon he committed suicide, while the other two escaped on foot into the trees.

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The coat on the body is said to have had the same clothier's label as Logan's coat when he was captured in Knoxville. There is disagreement over whether the body lacked a wrist scar Logan had from an earlier shooting after Belle Fourche (examinations both do and do not mention the scar). The body lacked a missing lower tooth Logan was known to be missing. Yet it also displayed buckshot scars Logan was not known to have. However, a scar on the back of the neck corresponded to the sort of wounds Logan received in his famous bar fight in Knoxville.

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The two robbers who escaped were heard calling the dead man "Sam." (Other reports say "Tom.")

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Jim Ferguson later wrote to Charley Siringo that the dead man had stayed with him before the robbery, and was not Logan.

June 11. Sheffield and Kilpatrick, on foot and starving, reportedly emerge from the mountains and turn up at the Glen ranch, four miles south of Parachute, and force a ranch hand to cook dinner for them. Then they force another hand to leave and walk to town to get ammunition for them, but the ranch hand ran into a posse, which surrounded the ranch, waited until dawn to rush it, and then found that the two had slipped away.  

HAD THE BANDITS CORNERED.

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Train Robbers, However, Elude Posse and Disappear In the Night.

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Glenwood Springs, Colorado, June 12. After one of the most exciting manhunts in the history of Colorado, the two remaining bandits concerned in the Denver and Rio Grande robbery near Parachute Tuesday night were cornered yesterday at a ranch house about four miles south of Parachute by a posse of deputy sheriffs. The two desperadoes after having been two days practically without food were forced to get out of the mountains to secure something to eat and ammunition to hold off the officers pursuing them.

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They arrived at the Glen ranch on Rattlesnake Hill about 4 PM and forced a ranch hand to cook supper for them Then they compelled a man named Frank Walker to go to Parachute for a supply of cartridges. After Walker had gone about a mile he met a portion of the sheriff's posse and told them of his experience. The posse immediately returned to the ranch house and surrounded the cabin in which it was believed the robbers were concealed. Night had fallen and guards were stationed but this morning at daylight when the posse closed in on the cabin the men had disappeared. All trace of them is now lost.

-- New York Sun, June 13, 1904.

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An article by local historian Nellie Duffy claims this was actually a posse that had dinner cooked for them, but she gives no citation for this claim other than using newspapers overall as source material, and I can find no subsequent clarification denying it was Kilpatrick and Sheffield involved in this incident as reported. As the two robbers were on foot, without food, lacking mounts and ammunition, with the river too swollen to cross safely, this is precisely what they would have had to do in order to survive. Jim Cox claimed to have trailed the robbers all the way to Hole in the Wall after they obtained horses near Glenwood Springs (though Smokov questions the claim), which seems to lend credence to this tale, so for now I am listing this as reported unless I can find a subsequent article correcting what was reported on the 13th.

Aug. 10. Butch details their livestock holdings in a letter to Matilda Davis (Elza’s mother-in-law) back in Utah    
Oct. 22. First explicit newspaper claim of Tom O'Day being drunk in the saloon.   Tom had been sent in ahead of the gang to observe "the lay of the land" about the bank and to inform the other members of the crowd if things did not look propitious for the daylight robbery. But Tom took one drink after another and finally fell into a drunken sleep in a saloon, propped against the wall and snoring comfortable in his chair. They rode into town, firing at everything in sight, and chattered up to the bank, where they secured a considerable sum of money. O'Day was roused by the firing and ran out of the saloon to the aid of him companions. He found the robbers closely beset by the townspeople, who had flocked to the scene, armed with rifles and who were shooting from behind every building that offered shelter.

All the robbers except O'Day made their escape. At Tom's trial, though the evidence against him was perfectly clear, he put on such a terrifying front that the witnesses who were to testify against him were frightened out of their intention, and there was nothing to do but let him go free.

--Santa Cruz Sentinel, Oct. 22, 1904.

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A report later in the year from Cheyenne also noted he had been in a saloon, drinking:

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More stories of O'Day's cowardice are coming to light constantly. It is said that he agreed with the Curry gang to go into Belle Fourche S. D., prior to the bank hold up in 1897, and learn the lay of the land in order that he might pilot the gang when they arrived. Instead of making good, he became drunk and was drinking in a saloon when the robbery occurred. Being unable to escape with the gang, he was arrested as a confederate, but could not be proven guilty.

--Cheyenne Daily Leader, Dec. 2, 1903.

Oct. 24. The Pinkertons learned Etta and Sundance had been in the US, and believed they were at Fort Worth.   They had returned home by now, according to Donna Ernst.
Dec. 30. Butch writes and orders supplies from Richard Clarke.    

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1905

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

   Early 1905. Harvey Logan, using the name Andrew Duffy, arrives in Cholila. Duffy is believed to have been identified as a Montana saloon owner. However, Duffy's name never appears in Wild Bunch lore--even if they may have known him--and there appears to be no good explanation as to why Butch and Sundance would trust a no-name saloon keeper with the secret of their identities and/or presence in Cholila.
January. Two men and a woman check into the Hotel Argentina in Villa Mercedes, claiming to be investors.

Prison officials learn that Ben Kilpatrick is bribing a guard, and using another prisoner, to smuggle out letters to Laura Bullion and various members of the Wild Bunch.

  The men start racing their horses through town so as to establish a pattern for this odd behavior, consistent with Butch’s past strategies.
Feb. 14. Two English-speaking bandits hold up the Banco de Tarapacá y Argentina in Río Gallegos, 700 miles south of Cholila. Butch and Sundance are quickly blamed for it.   Netted up to $100,000. This is said to be the robbery where Etta talked her way into the vault area of the bank to make diagrams of it. During the escape, a legend has it that she shot out a telegraph wire with her rifle. However, an Argentine official is said to have visited their ranch a day after the robbery, and some think this is an alibi for them.

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This robbery would be their undoing, and set things in motion to drive them from their ranch.

Mid-February. Etta, Butch and Sundance are recorded in a census at their ranch.    
April 19. Butch writes to Richard Clarke that supplies that had been ordered should be delivered to his ranch foreman, Dan Gibbon, as he was going to be leaving Cholila.    
April 22. Sundance’s sister receives a letter from him for the last time.    
May 1. Butch writes his last letter from the ranch to a neighbor, stating they were leaving that day. Etta, Butch and Sundance then head for Puerto Montt, Chile, having sold parts of their ranch for $18,000 pesos to Thomas Austin of the Cochamo Co.    
May 9. They arrive at lake Nahuel Huapi, sailing over to Chile on a boat called the Condor. Wenceslao Solis, a friend and employee, returns with their saddles and instructions to continue liquidating their assets.    
June 28. Sundance writes from Valparaiso to a friend: We arrived here today, and the day after tomorrow my wife and I leave for San Francisco.    
July 27. A woman named Ethel Brown receives an appendectomy near Sacramento.   Brown was an alias used by Sundance in this period, and this event would have occurred days after Etta and Sundance would have arrived back in California. There is insufficient evidence to definitively tie this to the story told by Percy Seibert, however.
July 29. A "Mrs. E. Place" arrives in New York aboard the SS Seguranca from Colon, Panama.    
Summer. Sundance and Butch settle in the city of Antofagasta, Chile. Eventually, Sundance "accidentally" shoots the police chief and is aided by US vice-Consul Frank Aller in settling the issue for a $1500 fine (or bribe)   Author James Horan's research notes suggest Etta was present when the police chief came up to the table, and that she excused herself just before the shooting. It is also possible that a woman left before that shooting, possibly notifying authorities.
Dec. 15. Elza Lay has his sentence commuted by Gov. Miguel Otero for his part in putting down a prison riot and saving the lives of the warden’s wife and daughter.   According to WS ranch manager William French's memoirs, Lay would then drop by for a visit, and over the course of their conversation would mention the fact that "Tom Capehart" had gone to South America with Jim Lowe (Butch Cassidy).

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Under no circumstances could Lay have been talking about the "real" Tom Capehart. He could only have been referring to the Sundance Kid! (See the note under Sep. 23, 1906.) 

Dec. 19. Etta, Butch, Sundance and another man (possibly Harvey Logan or Robert Evans) rob the Banco de la Nacion in Villa Mercedes, Argentina.   Netted over $32,000. This is really significant because it is an enormous amount. While on the run in South America, Butch and Sundance were often apparently penniless. It is the author’s speculation they may have been banking money in Chile, and this could be the basis for Etta’s supposedly trying to obtain a death certificate for Sundance in 1909. If she did seek such a document, she probably was trying to withdraw the money from whatever bank it was stored in.

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During the robbery, the bank manager was pistol-whipped (some accounts assert shot in the head) by the unknown third man.

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One claim has it that Etta cut her hair short, and that she wore a wig in this period.

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1906

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

1906. According to a report by Percy Seibert citing Sundance, Etta--suffering from appendicitis (or gall bladder problems)--was taken back to Denver for an operation. Sundance then abandoned her after shooting up a saloon/cathouse, fearing the police would be searching for him.Sundance eventually returned and went to work for a man named Letson as a muleteer, but left the job, winding up at the Concordia mine with Butch.   At this point, Etta Place officially disappears from history.
January. Butch was seen by Bill Connell at a "Texas Cowboys" rodeo event in the Sociedad Sportiva arena in Buenos Aires.    
April. Sundance, accompanied by outlaw Robert Evans, returned to Cholila to collect the proceeds from the sale of some livestock left with friend Daniel Gibbon, a Welsh rancher. He then departed alone, while Evans hooked up with William Wilson. Butch, meanwhile, was hired on by the Concordia Tin Mine and was eventually joined by Sundance, who had been working as a muleskinner.    
  Spring. Will Coburn claimed to have visited with Harvey Logan in Cholila.  
May 12. Wm. Pinkerton writes Ft. Worth Chief of Police JH Maddox, requesting he find out all he can about whom Etta Place is (though he did not refer to her by name).    
July 21. A Flagstaff prostitute by name of Fannie Porter is bailed out of jail two months after knifing a man.   As reported in the Coconino Sun:

Fannie Porter, one of the women of the Williams half world,* who has been in jail here for the past two months, on charge of stabbing a man, was released on bond furnished by Williams parties Thursday.

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* A polite way of saying a prostitute from Williams, Az. Prostitutes then were called "Fairies of the half world."

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The fate of the famous Fannie Porter has never been known with certainty, and has only been speculated. Was this woman the Fannie Porter? We cannot be certain. But her name turns up repeatedly in Flagstaff records, accused of a variety of Red Light District crimes, until her death on Sunday, October 20, 1912.

Sep. 23. A newspaper article appears throughout the US about the Wild Bunch, telling about Butch and Sundance robbing the bank at Villa Mercedes, and the name "Etta Place" is published for the first time. A photo of Etta and the Fort Worth 5 appears in the article.  

Some believe this is where an "error" takes root of mistaking Etta's "real" name of Ethel for an incorrect "Etta."

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In his memoirs, WS ranch manager, William French, recorded that he read what can only have been this article, around a year (it would have been around 10 months) after speaking with Elza Lay, and being told that "Tom Capehart" had gone to South America with Jim Lowe (Butch Cassidy). French further noted that a photo of "Tom Capehart" was in this article, but while Jim was called Butch Cassidy, "Tom had again changed his cognomen."

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As the photo was of the Fort Worth 5, and he knew Butch as Jim Lowe, Ben Kilpatrick as "Big Johnny" Ward; and as the article stated Will Carver and Harvey Logan were dead and French makes no mention of Capehart's being expired, he can only be referring to the Sundance's Kid's photograph as the "Tom Capehart" he knew.

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Thus, there is no other conclusion that Lay orally, and French by photographic ID, claimed the Sundance Kid was the "Tom Capehart" that worked at the WS ranch.

October. Abe Gill, Jim Winters’ stepbrother, vanishes, and his fate is never learned. A variety of accusations are leveled at everyone from Harvey Logan, Jim Thornhill, a cowboy named Pat Herron, or even a group of Indians of doing away with him.    
Late 1906. Before returning to South America, Percy Seibert claimed to have watched a silent movie at Coney Island titled Butch Cassidy & the Wild Bunch.   No such movie is known to have existed. Either Seibert--though certain of the title--was mistaken, it was a repackage of The Great Train Robbery, or he made up the incident.

Christmas, 1906. Mining engineer Percy Seibert meets and befriends Butch and Sundance at a party after his boss, Clement Rolla Glass, had hired them as guards/drovers.

   

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1907

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

Feb. 13. Cousin Bob Lee released from prison for his part in the Wilcox robbery.    
November. Butch and Sundance depart the Concordia mine and head to Santa Cruz, Bolivia.    
Nov 12. Butch posts a letter from Sucre, the Bolivian capital, to his friends at the Concordia mine.        
Late 1907. Butch and Sundance are in Santa Cruz, Bolivia.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

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1908

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

Feb. 16. Butch writes his last known letter, to Clement Glass.    
June 3. Tom O'Day is released from prison.    
June 13. Barely out of jail, Tom O'day is arrested in Thermopolis for playing in an illegal poker game at the Capital saloon in violation of local anti-gambling laws.    
July 2. Tom O'Day passes through Casper on the way to Thermopolis, assuring a reporter he plans to live an honest life. (Natrona County Tribune, July 8, 1908.)    
  Aug. 19. Butch and Sundance may have robbed a payroll at Eucaliptus, south of La Paz  
Nov. 4. Butch and Sundance make their final robbery of a mine payroll near Tupiza.    
Nov. 5. They arrive in the town of Tomahuaico, staying overnight and then forcing engineer A. G. Francis to act as a guide for them.    
Nov. 5 They arrive and spend the night in Estarca, allowing Francis to go the next morning as they continue on to San Vicente.    
Nov. 6. Butch and Sundance are said to have been killed in the famous shootout in San Vicente.    
Nov. 7. Butch and Sundance are buried in San Vicente.

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Concha notifies the Aramayo Mine that their payroll has been recovered (but does not return it).

   
Week of Nov. 8. Tom O'Day marries Mabel Anderson. (Natrona County Tribune Nov, 18, 1908.)   The marriage apparently didn't last as he married a prostitute named Jean by 1910.

 

   

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1909

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

Jan. 2. Clement Rolla Glass, Butch and Sundance's old employer, dies mysteriously in a Buenos Aires hotel of both a shot to the gut and head, which is ruled a suicide.    
March 21. A Pinkerton report claims an informant has Logan and Sundance, in June of 1908, living on a ranch at Villa de Mercedes.    
March 27. Elza Lay marries Mary Calvert.    
  July 31. After a person--believed by some to be Etta--contacts diplomat Frank Aller in Chile, seeking help in obtaining a death certificate for Sundance from Bolivian authorities to "Settle his estate," Aller contacts the American Legation in La Paz. If Etta, how she knew of their deaths is a complete mystery. She may have wanted the death certificate to satisfy herself that he was dead, or she may have wanted it to retrieve money banked in Chile.
Aug. 23. "Gunplay" Maxwell encounters deputy Ed Black in the Oasis saloon in Price, and lures him out to a duel, coming out the loser.   There had been bad blood between the two because Black had testified against Maxwell in Nevada. Maxwell, though he was never much more than a wannabe member of the Wild Bunch, fired one shot that only grazed Black, while the deputy put three slugs into him, thinking he missed as some of the slugs passed through Maxwell's body, kicking up dust in the street behind him. With his last breath, Maxwell begged Black to hold his fire as he died.

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Ironically, Maxwell had visited the sheriff's office earlier and admired his .41 calibre Colt, remarking he'd hate to go up against a gun like that--and Johnson killed him with that very gun. He had also been planning a robbery in the area, and a disguise kit was found on him. (Inter-Mountain Republican, Aug. 26, 1909).

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So ended the career of a mediocre outlaw.

Oct. 8. In Shoshoni, Tom O'Day beats up a rancher, who goes after him with a gun, but is kept from killing him. O'Day is arrested and released after paying a $15 fine. (Cheyenne Wyoming Tribune, Oct. 8, 1909.)    
     

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1910

Thanks to Dan Buck for help on the Bolivian activities during 1910.

Date/event

May have happened

Notes

Week of Feb. 6. Tom O'Day, Charles Carmichael and Jay Smith allegedly broke into a railroad car in Shoshoni, Wy., and stole 13 cases of beer. They were arrested a week later, but charges were eventually dropped.    
March 8. Pinkerton Pacific Division manager, J.C. Fraser, writes to the New York Pinkerton Manager, George D. Bangs, that an informant: “Gave me to distinctly understand that Parker was dead and was deader than hell, and that it was a damn good thing he was dead.”          
August. Frank Aller is in La Paz, and reiterates his request for a death certificate in person to Alexander Benson, Charge d'Affaires ad interim, American Legation.    
Aug. 31. Benson writes the foreign minister in La Paz about the death certificate; the foreign minister writes the prefect in Potosi, in turn, the prefect writes the subprefect in Sud Lipez & Sud Chicas (presumably in Tupiza), in turn, and the subprefect of Porco (Uyuni) also got involved, presumably because the Concha squad was from Uyuni.    
Sep. 3. Benson writes Aller regarding his correspondence with the Bolivian Foreign Office.    
Sep. 16. Aller writes Benson thanking him for his actions, adding further details, and enclosing a copy of his original 31 July 1909 letter, "About which I spoke to you while in La Paz."    
Oct. 4. The Potosi prefect writes the foreign minister back, telling him that the subprefect of Sud Chichas (Tupiza) has looked into the matter and replied with a “certificate” issued by a Sud Chichas judge. An enclosed letter from the judge “certifies” that the investigation of the deaths of the two North Americans did not result in their identification and they had not found any documents on the matter. It goes on to say the two men were killed by a force from Uyuni, and that all the money and the bandits’ personal affects were recovered.    
Oct. 18. The foreign minister writes the subprefect of Porco complaining that he has heard nothing from him. (Odd because two weeks earlier the subprefect of Sud Chichas had already replied with a certificate.)      
Oct. 19. The Potosi prefect writes the foreign minister that per the subprefect in Uyuni, the men who participated in the shootout are unavailable--Captain Concha has been transferred to Santa Cruz, the two soldiers have left the service, and the comisario has left the police force. (The prefect seems to be unaware that Torres did not leave, but was killed.) No attempt seems to have been made to find Concha, the soldier, the comisario, nor was an attempt made to contact the Aramayo officials, who certainly would have known something. Moreover, again quoting the Uyuni subprefect, the prefect says that queries have been sent to the corregidor (an appointed mayor) and parish priest in San Vicente.     
Nov. 8. The Porco subprefect writes the Potosi prefect saying that the San Vicente corregidor reported that there are no documents in San Vicente about the “death of the two Yankees,” and that the San Vicente priest has not responded to “repeated requests” for information.     
Nov. 17. A letter mentions the San Vicente priest has still not answered.    The reluctance of the priest to cooperate is tantalizingly interesting. He may have had no knowledge of the events…he may has been awaiting permission from Church authorities to act--or he may have known the account of how Butch and Sundance died was a lie, and did not wish to put his name to a false document. We simply do not know.

Dec. 26. The Potosi prefect sends Benson the foreign minister the death certificate and a ten-page report issued by the district attorney in Tupiza.

    On January 21, 1911, Benson writes Aller, enclosing a copy of the "complete record of the case."

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Date/event

May have happened

Notes

     
     
     
     
     

 

   

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Answers to some common questions.

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"What were the real names of Butch and Sundance?"

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Robert Parker and Harry Longabaugh.

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"How did Sundance get his nickname?"

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He spent a year and a half in jail at Sundance, Wyoming.

...

"How did Butch get his name?"

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He took the name Cassidy from his mentor, rustler Mike Cassidy, who worked at the Parker family ranch when Butch was a teenager. The nickname "Butch" has several possible origins:

People started calling him that when he worked at a butcher shop, and the name stuck.

Matt Warner named him that because he had worked in a butcher shop.

Matt Warner named him that after his rifle--named "Butch"--when Bob Parker tried firing it, and its kick knocked him over.

"George Cassidy" started calling himself that because it sounded "tougher" than George, and was a whole lot better than his original nickname as a youth, which was "Sallie"!

..

"How accurate was the movie?"

..

On a scale of 1-10…about a 4. It was great entertainment, and introduced three fascinating people to a generation of people who never heard of them. (If you haven't seen it--go buy the DVD!) But it was factual only in the most general sense. It's most egregious misrepresentation (other than relegating Etta Place to simply a girlfriend) was in claiming Butch and Sundance headed to South America to keep robbing in greener pastures. The truth is, they went down there to "go straight," and start a ranch in Argentina, not Bolivia. They only returned to robbing when two men and a woman started robbing banks--which they got blamed for. Forced to abandon their ranch, they returned to doing the only thing they knew how to do--rob banks.

..How

Was there really a "Super Posse" led by Joe LeFors? Did Butch and Sundance have to jump off a cliff to escape it? Did it follow them to South America?

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Sorta. No. No.

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The idea of having a special posse with their own train and horses ready to go had been implemented a time or two over the years, but never in the sense of hiring a group of high-end specialists from around the country as the movie portrayed--and it never came anywhere near Butch and Sundance! In the incident portrayed in the movie, the posses were actually chasing Harvey Logan and his men after the Tipton robbery. Butch and Sundance were nowhere near the area, and were on their way to Nevada to rob the Bank of Winnemucca.

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No one jumped off any cliffs to escape any posses, though various members of the Wild Bunch (Matt Warner, for one) almost drowned at times, swimming rivers to escape capture.

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LeFors, a legend in his own mind, was also no brilliant lawman. He chased the Wild Bunch on more than one occasion and never caught any of them. (His best claim to fame was arresting bounty hunter Tom Horn.)

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Undercover Pinkerton agent, Charley Siringo--who had no better luck in capturing Butch and Sundance, or his main quarry Harvey Logan--declared LeFors incompetent.

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Neither LeFors nor any "Super Posse" ever went to South America after Butch and Sundance, but various Pinkerton agents did.

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By the way--there was no "Lord Baltimore"character in what has been come to be called the "Super Posse."

..

"I've heard that Butch Cassidy didn't really die as the movie showed, but that he came back to the US. Is that true?"

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Before noon, I have some doubts. After noon, I don't. The most likely answer is that he died in San Vicente.

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Did he die as the Bolivians claim, committing suicide after he and Sundance couldn't defeat two lesser opponents? I have my doubts. He certainly didn't die fighting half the Bolivian Army! But assuming the Bolivians fundamentally reported the truth, the conclusion I draw is that Butch and Sundance got trapped in a hut at the end of a walled-in courtyard, probably couldn't hit their last two opponents because they were hunkering down and firing wildly so they wouldn't be exposed and get hit, and the rest of the town eventually joined in the fight. Butch then realized the jig was up, shot Sundance for getting them into the jam in the first place by coming into San Vicente when he had wanted to avoid the town altogether, then committed suicide. That being said, there is certainly a chance the two were actually captured and sumarily excuted.

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"Didn't Butch's sister say he came back?"

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Not only her, a bunch of people said he did! First we'll deal with the sister, who was only a baby when he left, and never knew him: Unfortunately, she has zero credibility. The reason is, her story changed, and once the story changes, your credibility is gone.

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In her first imterview, she claimed Butch had no idea what became of Etta and Sundance after leaving them.

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But after her story came out, Kerry Ross Boren contacted her with evidence he had that Etta fought with Pancho Villa in the Mexican Revolution--and lo and behold, suddenly the story was now that Butch was drinking in a Mexcian cantina, and up came Etta, tapping him on the shoulder! Then she took him home to Sundance, they spent time together, and he eventually left them at a bullfight.

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Once something like that happens, your credibility is shot.

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Apart from his sister, a wide variety of people claimed Butch came home in the 1920s including two close female friends, Ann and Josie Bassett, and reportedly Matt Warner and Elza Lay (though there's a question on them). Beyond these, quite a few less-noteworthy people claimed to have seen him.

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The problem is, a fraud named Bill Phillips went around in the mid-1920s and 1930s claiming to be Butch--and he was good at it. We aren't certain what part he may have played in these reported "Butch sightings." He may even have conned Butch's sister, which some good historians I know (excluding Dan Buck) believe, though she vehemently denied Butch was the man known as Bill Phillips.

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So the bottom line is:

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Many people claimed Butch returned home and was seen at the same time a skilled fraud was posing as Butch.

Some of these people--if they were telling the truth about encountering him--knew Butch well enough they should have been able to unmask even the most artful impostor.

We can make plausible arguments for and against these sighting claims so they prove nothing.

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My personal opinion is that Sundance absolutely died down there, which means by extension Butch would have died with him.* But is there at least a little room for debate on Butch? Perhaps.

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* While there is no good evidence for it, some speculate it was Harvey Logan, a man named Hutcheon, or some other outlaw who actually died with Sundance.

...

Didn't they do DNA on their bodies, and prove it wasn't them?

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The cemetery is a mess, with remains piled atop each other, and no good records of who is buried where. A team tried to find the bodies, but found the wrong bodies to test.

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"How good could they shoot?"

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Regarding Butch:

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He could ride around a tree at full speed and empty a six gun into the tree, putting every shot into a six inch circle.

--George Streeter, as quoted by Charles Kelly.

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Regarding both:

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"Cassidy looked around and selected four empty bottles. He tossed two to Longabaugh and kept the other two. Outside, both outlaws settled into a semi-crouch, then threw the bottles high in the air. I never saw anything like it. I never saw two guns drawn faster, and I was with men skilled in firearms all my life. Before I knew it the Colts were in their hands and they were shooting. The four bottles crashed in splinters. They repeated this trick several times. Sometimes Butch missed, but the Kid always hit the falling targets. However, against Mr. Glass they weren't too good at firing at fixed targets. As Butch said, 'I guess we're better when our targets don't stand still.'"

--Percy Siebert as related to James Horan.

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"What happened to Etta Place?"

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No one knows. She is the great mystery of the Wild West. The best information we have comes from Butch and Sundance's boss and friend, mining engineer, Percy Siebert, who claimed Sundance told him that in 1906** she came down with appendicitis (though I think it was gall bladder disease), and he took her back to Denver for an operation. (San Francisco hospitals were overcrowded and probably not set up for it after the earthquake.) After checking her into the hospital, Sundance promptly went out, got drunk at a saloon/cathouse, and shot up the place. Fearing the police, he ran out and seems to have gone to the hospital, left his money with a Dear Jane letter for Etta (probably in recovery from the operation), and abandoned her.

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** No records for this have ever been found, though I have discovered that an "Ethel Brown"--Brown being an alias Sundance used in this time period--had an appendectomy near Sacramento mere days after she and Sundance would have arrived back in San Francisco in 1905, but there is no proof this was Etta Place.

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What became of her after that is unknown. She is thought to have been living in San Francisco in 1906, but nothing definite is known. She may have sought a death certificate for Sundance in 1909. Speculation of her fate after that is all over the place.

Some say that she...

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Became a Madame in San Francisco…

Opened a cathouse in Fort Worth…

Married a boxing promoter…

Fought with Pancho Villa in Mexico…

Ran a sanitarium...

Led a bandit gang in Argentina...

Robbed banks in the 1920s...

Had a daughter who was a bank robber...

Had a son who inspired the James Bond character...

Died in a South American shootout...

Died in 1918...

Was shot by an abusive lover in 1922…

Committed suicide in 1924…

Died in 1935…

Died in 1959…

Died in 1962…

Died in the 1970s...

…And the list goes on and on.

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.."Could she have died in San Vicente with them?"

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No. Butch and Sundance forced a man to act as guide for them on the way to San Vicente, and they were alone.

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"Was she a prostitute?"

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There isn't a shred of hard evidence that she was. The myth that she was came from the Pinkertons, who simply presumed that the only kind of women the Wild Bunch consorted with were prostitutes so she herself had to be one.

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The Pinkertons pulled out all the stops in trying to find out who she was, which included showing her photo to every police chief in every town in Texas Sundance was known to frequent. Had she been a prostitute, anyone that attractive would have been recognized and known by local authorities, and they had no more idea who she was than the Pinkertons did. (And anyone who looked like her could easily have found a wealthy husband, and would have had no need to become a prostitute.) Further, no men historically ever came forward and claimed to have been any of her clients. More critically, jilted prostitute Callie Hunt--when eagerly "ratting out" the gang to the Pinkertons--didn't mention a word about a girl named Etta being one of Fannie's girls, or Sundance's even having a relationship with one of the girls from Fannie's Sporting House during the Pinkertons' interrogation. Neither did Fannie Porter herself (nor any of the women from her Sporting House) affirm Sundance's running off with one of her girls in her subsequent interview with the Pinkertons.

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That said, is it theoretically possible Etta could have had a job as a saloon girl (which were not prostitutes, but often earned good money in wages and tips), and a saloon is where Sundance could have met her? Yes. But again, there's no evidence.

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She was probably from some middle-class family, attended Finishing school, had a good education and a good head on her shoulders (she kept the books for the ranch in Cholila, and was always described as charming and intelligent), and just where Sundance met her remains a mystery.

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All we can be sure of is that she had terrible taste in men, and that she was perhaps the great beauty of the Wild West.

..

"Was she a teacher?"

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That she might have been a Denver school teacher seems to trace itself to Pinkerton agent Frank Dimaio.  There is no specific evidence for it, though the Lamb family--friends of Harvey Logan--also seemed to believe that she was from Denver. She clearly was a very intelligent girl, and was certainly qualified to be a teacher. But just as with the case of the prostitute claim, no one ever came forward claiming to have been a student of hers. I do know of a young 4th grade Texas schoolteacher of British extraction named Ethel who was around in early 1900 and then mysteriously vanished from the radar before the 1900 census began in June and not mentioned again despite other family members regularly being mentioned in census and social records throughout the next decade. But examples like that invariably lead to a dead end and no resolution just as in the case of an unemployed music teacher named Ethel Bishop. Bishop, discovered by Donna Ernst, lived a few blocks from Fannie Porter's in 1900. Investigating that case with a descendant of the woman, the less-than-fully-cooperative individual made some comments to Donna that might have implied a tie-in to Etta Place, then died without confirming or denying whether Ethel Bishop was Etta Place, and so the trail ended.

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That's how it always winds up in the search for the real Etta Place.

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"Was she that attractive for the time?"

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"She was a goddess--everyone was enamored of her."

--Comment by Argentinian researcher Francisco Juarez, who interviewed a number of Etta's enamored male neighbors in Cholila while they were still alive.

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"Were she and Sundance married or just living together?"

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They were absolutely married. Sundance himself wrote a friend they were married, and repeatedly referred to her as his wife. Additionally, she was always known to be wearing a wedding ring, though many historians thought it was just for show. However, a while back I enhanced her photo to show she also is wearing an engagement ring as well.

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Not only that, but the enhancement reveals she is wearing a set of Victorian courtship jewelry, a fact historians never realized. In that era, a prospective suitor give his Intended a two-item set of jewelry as their relationship progressed: a necklace and bracelet would actually come before she received an engagement and wedding ring. Etta is wearing both a bracelet and a simple gold necklace. That's not unusual. But interestingly, she has the necklace improperly hanging over an ascot she wears instead of the ascot hanging over the necklace, which would be the normal way of dressing. (You can see this in the photo of she and Sundance at the top of this page.)  The necklace and ascot couldn't possibly hang together like this unless the ascot were deliberately tucked under the necklace to display it. This suggests she intentionally wanted the necklace visible in the photo because it meant something to her, and it further implies a prolonged courtship, not that Sundance simply picked her up in a cathouse and ran off with her between Winnemucca and late 1900. My belief is--assuming he didn't know her earlier from a relationship with Butch if there was one--that he met her in Denver or Galveston and courted her in 1899 through 1900 when the timeline shows he disappears from late July, 1899, until the Winnemucca robbery in September, 1900.

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But in the end, we have no idea.

...

"Was there anything else noteworthy about her, other than her looks?"

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"She could ride like a Sioux wind spirit."

--James Horan.

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Apart from her riding ability, she supposedly had amazing rifle skills. When the local governor visited their ranch in Argentina, instead of Butch and Sundance showing off with their guns, they brought Etta out to impress him with her rifle shooting. Just what she could do has been lost to history. At minimum, she could shoot like a junior Annie Oakley, and there is one apocryphal story of her being able to hit birds in flight.

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I suspect she was able to rapid-fire like the Rifleman--a talent Matt Warner also had--though she wouldn't have fired from the hip.

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She could also have been a first-rate cook in a Mexican restaurant if she'd wanted to open one.

..

"Hasn't new research proven she was never named Etta, but rather Ethel?"

..

No! This Ethel thing has been blown out of proportion. All we know for sure is that her name was signed in as Ethel a couple of times in the US by Sundance, and that in Argentina she appears to have gone by that name. From that, a belief has grown that she was never known as Etta, but only as Ethel, and history has been wrong for a hundred years. The error, claim some, is traceable to "a 1906 newspaper misprint, which is the first time the name Etta Place actually appears in print, which caused everyone to mistakenly believe her name was actually Etta."

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First, the fact that an outlaw uses a name in a hotel registry and in South America is no proof that was her real name. It's equally likely that name was an alias.

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Next, let's ask if the supposed "error" name has support outside of a "newspaper misprint" to support it.

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The answer is--yes!

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The inconvenient truth for those touting an "Ethel only" theory is that 100% of the people in the US who ever claimed to know Etta Place--or knew of Etta Place from others who had known her--referred to the woman only by the name of Etta, and never by the name of Ethel!

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Some of those people are Nobodies, but some have some pretty significant names, including:

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Ann Bassett.

Josie Bassett.

Maude Lay.

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All of these are women we absolutely know were intimately familiar with the Sundance Kid and/or Butch Cassidy.

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"Ethel only" people will then attempt to discredit them as witnesses, and in the case of Ann Bassett, who loved to tell stories, that's not too hard to do. It's harder to do with Josie, but it's hardest of all to do with Maude Lay. A good Mormon girl, Maude Lay had a decent reputation, had no agenda to make money off her story, never went out of her way to promote her story publicly, never had a story that changed, and has no issues with credibility--except when she discusses Etta Place. Then her story throws a wrench into some people's theories.

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The next step is to suggest her memory was bad, criticize her daughter and grandson as either relating the story wrongly, or flat-out lying, and so on.

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Part of the problem is that Maude's story about Etta Place was not repeated by her daughter and grandson publicly until fraud "Harry Longabaugh, Jr." first told it in the early 1970s, long after Maude's death in 1958. This raises red flags and gives the nay sayers ammunition. So ironically, one of the greatest attestations of her credibility--her shunning of the spotlight--becomes her greatest liability!

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Be that as it may, grandson Harve Murdock is adamant he heard stories about Etta Place from his grandmother firsthand in the 1950s, and Maude never referred to the woman by any name other than Etta.

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Never Ethel.

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Now beyond that, there is an even more critical problem for those who believe she must only have been known by the name Ethel--the very man who tells us more about what Butch and Sundance did in South America than anyone else: Percy Seibert.

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Historian James Horan was fortunate enough to meet and interview Seibert in the 1950s, and among the subjects that came up was Etta Place. Now when Horan related Seibert's recollections about what he was told about her, what name did Seibert use?

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According to Horan's lengthy description of the conversation related in The Outlaws, Seibert repeatedly responded to and used the name Etta, and quoted Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid calling her Etta, not Ethel.

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If what the revisionists believe is true, when Horan brought up the issue, and asked about "Etta Place," under normal circumstances the first words out of Seibert's mouth--or the mouth of anyone who should have known her "real" name--should have been, "Well, her name was really Ethel."

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Horan's ears should have perked up, and he should have pressed the point, found out why her "real" name was Ethel, then been delighted at this startling new bit of information he could reveal in his books about one of the West's most mysterious women that had been lost to history for decades.

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Instead, the ubiquitous cognitive dissonance that fell upon the Pinkertons causing them to believe a "newspaper misprint" and forever get the name wrong seemed to persist, and Seibert--supposedly knowing Ethel was her real name since Butch and Sundance would obviously have spoken the name correctly to him--deliberately used the name Etta, perpetuating a historical error instead of taking the opportunity to correct it for posterity.

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Or (playing devil's advocate) perhaps Seibert went ahead and used/explained how her name was really Ethel, and Horan--for whatever reason--decided he didn't like that, deliberately ignored what Seibert really said, and overwrote the name Etta for Ethel, twisting what Seibert said, and willingly perpetuated a myth when he could have gone down in history as the man who corrected a major historical error.

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Neither scenario makes good sense.

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The most logical scenario is that Seibert. as reported, used the name Etta because that was the name Butch and Sundance used to him, so Seibert repeated it, then Horan logically followed suit.***

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*** By the way, Horan had possession of one of the South American wanted posters calling her Ethel, but between his conversations with Frank Dimaio and Percy Seibert apparently considered it so insignificant he dismissed even mentioning the name difference. So he actually knew before any of the modern historians about the name Ethel Place.

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Dan Buck believes that Horan used exaggeration and poetic license in his retelling of the meeting with Seibert. But whether he did or did not embellish the tale, we know for a fact that he did have an extensive interview with Seibert, during which the subject of Etta Place was covered. As the chronicler of the event, Horan officially quoted Seibert as only using the name Etta, and with no tape recordings or witnesses attesting to the contrary, we cannot use speculation to rewrite Horan's record with information the writer himself did not use, in order to promote a revised name agenda. Thus, we must presume that Seibert used the name Etta and claimed or implied that Butch and Sundance used it as well since that is how his  face-to-face interviewer reported it..

..

After Seibert, there is one more wrench thrown into the works: John Gardiner.

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A young Scotsman**** who detested Sundance and was head over heels in love with Etta, calling her his "first and only love," his recollections about her quoted by friend Frank O'Grady (an admittedly less-than-perfect witness with a flare for exaggeration) follow suit with every other alleged close friend of hers: Gardiner was never recorded as calling her by the name Ethel--only by the name Etta!

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**** For the record, Dan Buck questions whether Gardiner ever knew Etta Place.

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So when you take these facts into consideration:

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Dual similar names floating around at the same time, one of which (Ethel) was written down and known to be used in South America…

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A list of people who claimed to know her/know of her in the US, and at least one good witness from South America (Seibert), all of whom used the name Etta regarding her…

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The conclusion to me is that you had a person actually known by two different names, and the historical name is the name her close friends actually knew her by, not the formal name.

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So while we cannot know for sure--and while it is possible Etta and Ethel were both aliases--I do not believe the question is whether it was Etta or Ethel; I believe it was both Etta and Ethel.

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"But how would someone named Ethel come to be called Etta?"

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Very easily. Assuming Ethel was ever her name, Etta is an acceptable derivation from it for a nickname. (I've done a pretty intense study, and even Juliettes have been called Etta.) But most likely she got the name as a child. Etta is exactly how a child learning to talk might pronounce Ethel, and it could easily stick.

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The theory that perhaps the Argentineans mispronounced Ethel as Etta does not hold up, and even Dan Buck has backed off on it last time we talked about it.

..

"There is a lot of mention about someone named Harvey Logan. Who was he?"

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Forgotten by history, in some ways he was a successor to Jesse James. Born and raised in the South in the aftermath of the War Between the States, he went west with his four brothers, two of whom died, and became an outlaw. He was perhaps the main force behind the Wild Bunch, with a deserved reputation as the toughest member of the gang, unsurpassed with a six gun. In the movie, he was portrayed by 6' 9" Ted Cassidy ("Lurch" from the Addams Family and "Hatchita" from MacKenna's Gold), though in real life he was a shrimpy little guy who could fight like an MMA star, and had no problem cleaning out a saloon. He and Butch never had a knife fight, but reportedly there were some issues at times over which one of them was the titular head of the gang. Butch was more the tactician, while Logan was more the opportunist, and each one of them led various members of the Wild Bunch on different robberies.

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Unlike Butch, Logan was a cold-blooded killer with a list of dead lawmen to his credit, and was never shy about using a gun to get out--or in--to trouble. He was so fast with a six gun, history records this about him:

.

Curry put a red poker chip on the back of his hand and then held his arm out, shoulder high. He spread his legs just a little, then just turned his hand and dropped the poker chip. Before that poker chip hit the ground, he had drawn his gun and emptied it. Five shots in the flash of an eye.

--Ed Tolten, Mormon bishop and lawman.

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He is commonly thought to have committed suicide after being wounded by a posse hunting him for a train robbery in 1904, but rumors persist that he joined Butch down in South America, and it was another man who died. (Some of his relatives claim he lived into the 1930s.)

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In the photos above, there is one of a man who looks like a hobo, sitting in a chair, rolling a smoke. That's Harvey Logan, also known as Kid Curry (and by the ridiculous moniker Kid Fearless before that). Another photo of a dead man wearing a hat, who looks a bit like Robert Mitchum, is reportedly that of Logan after his suicide.

...

"Did any of the Wild Bunch write their memoirs?"

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Only Matt Warner, an early partner of Butch's who was in jail during the heyday of the Wild Bunch's activities. His book is Last of the Bandit Riders, and is interesting reading.

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Walt Punteney, meanwhile, appeared to have tried his hand at being a poet during a 1913 visit to his sister in Nebraska:

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A recipe for a happy day:

A heart full of thankfulness. A thimbleful of care; a soul full of hopefulness, an early morning prayer; a smile to greet the morning with, a kind word as key to open the door and greet the day what'ere it brings to thee; a patient trust in Providence to sweeten all the way--all these combined with thoughtfulness will make a happy day. Walter Putney.

--The North Platte semi-weekly Tribune, July 29, 1913.

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The rest of the gang either died or did not write their memoirs.

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The biggest tragedy is that neither Elza Lay, who lived into the 1930s, nor Laura Bullion, who lived into the 1960s, wrote their memoirs. What stories they could have told!

..

But…

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Jack Stroud discovered an account in a US newspaper purportedly given by Sundance of the Winnemucca robbery! (While Mike Bell previously found a copy over in England.) It has some major inaccuracies, and so many doubt Sundance was the source. Because of an anecdote identical to one told by Matt Warner, I think it possible Warner could be the source or had some input, but we simply do not know.*****

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***** New research by Larry Pointer suggests an outlaw named Herb Grice may have written it, but the evidence is not conclusive.

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THE ANACONDA STANDARD, SUNDAY MORNING, JULY 10, 1910

ANACONDA, MONTANA

This narrative of the holdup of the Winnemucca (Nevada) bank was prepared for the Standard by Harry Lonbaugh (Lonbaugh he spells it), the notorious outlaw, while in the mountains of Bolivia, South America, where, at latest accounts, he still was pursuing the career of a bandit and political revolutionist. He gave the copy to a friend who, returning to the United States, has transmitted it to the Standard. The Winnemucca bank was held up in 1902. The robbers made off with $16,000 in gold. As will be observed, Lonbaugh writes terse, idiomatic English. He is very sparing in his use of capitals, commas and periods, and some editing has been necessary to overcome these deficiencies. But scarcely a word has been changed. - Editor of the Standard.

"The Winnemucca Holdup by One of Them." - When the sheriffs of 14 western states and the Pinkerton Detective company read this title, they will put their ear to the ground, then jump up and go off on a hot trail-once they have found it-that makes a hunted man wish he had not done it.

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Days and dates cut no figure with this, summer and winter are the only periods of time that we reckon with. On one bright sunny day after loafing at Powder Springs for a month waiting for Kid Curry, we started for the Winnie bank, Butch Cassidy, George Carver and myself (Harry Lonbaugh).

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Carver was known to the man hunters as "Flatnose" George. We called him "colonel" because he was such a large well-proportioned man, with a military appearance, straight as an arrow and strong as a horse. The boys sent me over to Winnemucca to size up the situation and pick out a trail for the getaway. I caught a freight train at Ogden and rode the bumpers into Winnemucca. It was raining when I got off the train and there were but few people on the street, so, without attracting attention, I made my way to a livery barn and got permission to sleep on the hay pile. I had been in town two days, had got the lay of the land down pat. The bank had a back door. There was a high wall around the back yard. Half a block down an alley there was a vacant lot; a good place to leave the horses while we were collecting the legal tender.

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The pay roll was big enough to go after. My work in town was finished and I was ready to go back and join the boys at Twin Falls, Idaho.

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While on my way to the depot a man passed me and in the glance that he gave me I read recognition. No train for me after that look. It was cayuse or break into jail. So back to the barn I went. There I bought a pinto and saddle. I took and paid for three days feed for the pony. Then I went back to the hayloft and waited for darkness. I wrote a letter to the boys, telling them to wait. After mailing the note, I went back to the hay loft and jumped out of the back door into a manure pile. Then I went to the pasture and got my horse. It was about 300 miles to Twin Falls. I made it in six days. The cayuse was for sale when I arrived but nobody would have him as a gift.

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HOLDING UP A STORE

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We went to Three Creek postoffice without incident, having bought a lot of horses. We never stole a horse with which to make a raid. Though on a getaway we took any kind that had good eyes.

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It was necessary to have grub cached at several different places on the trail for use on the way back from Winnemucca. Not having any money, we had to hold up the store at Three Creek. The place was run by an old man and his wife. We called on them after they had gone to bed. The old man said he wouldn't trust us for a bill of goods, so we showed him our guns. After looking at the .45s half a minute, he said: "Yes, I'll fill your order."

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We loaded two pack horses with grub, and were about to leave when the old man said: "Boys, I've got some good hats on the top shelf, perhaps you would like one apiece."

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"Sure." We would.

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Butch and I got one. There was none large enough for the colonel. We rode into Winnemucca one morning before daylight and put our horses on the vacant lot. After eating breakfast that morning Butch and the colonel strolled about town. I kept out of sight for fear some one would recognize me and give the alarm. About 3:30 Butch gave me the hurryup signal. When I crossed the street and met him he said: "The sheriff is organizing a posse at the livery barn, so it's a chase for us whether we take in the bank or not."

,

Colonel came up while we were talking. He said it was suicide to attempt the holdup at that time, and advised postponing it for a month or so.

,

Butch said no, he said no futures for him. It was a gaze of run anyway and he was going to do something to run for.

,

"All right," said the colonel, "but here is where we get a permanent address."

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ENTERING THE BANK

We then went into the bank. The colonel had a rifle under his long coat. He acted as doorkeeper, Butch carried the war bag to put the money in. My part was to do the scare act. I went to a window that had a sign over the top that read, "Paying Teller." A nice pale man, with his hair parted in the middle, asked? "What can I do for you, sir?"

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"Hand over that money," I answered, at the same time pulling a pair of .45s on him, "Up with your hands," I said, "Stick them up everybody."

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There was a tall, slim, sallow-faced kid working a typewriter over in the corner. He did not hear me at the first, then I yelled at him: "Stick 'em up, Slim, or I'll make you look like a naval target!" When the poor fellow turned around and saw what was going on he collapsed. He put his hands up, but could not keep them there. Anybody that wished could come into the bank, but the colonel made them join the row of high reachers that stood against the wall.

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Butch went down the corrider and through a gate in the wire fence. He had just got inside the corral when a man came out of the back room. Butch greeted him with a smile and said: "Friend, my associate would like to speak to you at this teller's window."

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When he got in line of my .45, he said: "What is going on here? What does this mean?"

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"It grieves me to inform you that the bank is losing out," replied Butch, who was then transferring the pay streak to the war bag.

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"Say friend," I said to the late arrival, "just feel how fine and soft the atmosphere is above your head, feel it with both hands at once."

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They were all up and nobody made a move, while Butch went into the vault and filled the war bag with gold coin.

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COURTESIES OF THE OCCASION

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The job was done and we were starting away when the paying teller said: "Boys, you have a nice little stake there, but I don't think you will be able to hold onto it."

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"Think again," replied the colonel as we went out the door and fastened it behind us.

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We went out the back way and when I got on top the wall I saw the posse lining up in front of the bank. Butch passed the war bag to me and just as I was about to drop it to the ground a man with a gun came to the mouth of the alley. He was about as mean a looking specimen as I ever saw. He looked like pictures I'd seen of the western bad man. He had a long black mustache and eyebrows almost as long as the mustache.

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"There's a gun fighter," I called to Butch, "get him quick."

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The Colonel jumped onto the wall and fired, tearing up the dirt in front of the bad man, who threw down his gun and ran away. We ran to the horses. Butch had a fine bay mare, and, as he was the lightest man, I handed him the sack. We had to go out on the main street in order to hit the trail toward the east. Away we went, the colonel in the lead, me behind.

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The posse evidently intended to hold an informal reception in front of the bank, with the wild bunch as entertainers. They were lined up in brave array behind boxes, barrels and brick piles that stood along Main street. So when we went out onto the street two blocks east, their breastworks were of no use. We had an open trail ahead and only a few more blocks to go when we would be out in the open country with nobody in front to stop us.

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It looked like plain sailing when, great balls of codfish hook, Butch dropped the war bag, which busted when it struck the ground. The bay mare seemed to go straight up when she lost the weight. The colonel was 200 yards away before he knew that something was wrong; then he wheeled around and came back. While Butch and I were scraping up the yellow boys and putting them in a new sack the colonel smoked the posse out of sight with a .30 U.S.

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After making the bag fast to the saddle we hit the road again, leaving $5,000 or $6,000 in the street. AS we raced along faces were peeping from windows like owls from hedge rows. The trail ran alongside the railroad a mile and a half to a place where we had fresh horses and more guns cached.

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We had not gone far till we saw that we were up against something that we had not counted on. We were chased by a locomotive. Who'd have thought of that?

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On it came. The engineer had it wide open and the fireman was doing his damndest. I could tell that by the roll of black smoke that was belching from the stack. We were about half way to our fresh horses when the engine got in range.

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At the first volley my old roan was shot in the belly. I was about 50 years behind Butch, who kept banging away with his .45. My horse began to lose ground. I had emptied my gun once and put in a fresh round. The engine was within 20 yards of me. The bullets were flying thick, the air seemed to be sizzling with hot lead. Then the colonel got into the game. He was a good shot, and that crew soon found it out. He began pumping lead straight at the cab. I could see the splinters fly at every shot. Finally one of the shots broke a steam pipe somewhere; then nothing could be seen of the engine but the black front; the cab was a fog bank. The moving fort was put out of commission or they would have got me, for I had to walk the last 100 yards and carry my saddle.

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GOOD HORSES IN NEVADA

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We had eight horses at the cache. Two of them were pack horses. So we tied the war bag onto a pack saddle and started for the Hole in the wall. We had some good horses and rode them to a ranch where we had left five of the best horses that we could find in Idaho. But, say- if you want to get good fast, long-winded race horses, go to Winnemucca. They have got them, or at least they had some, once upon a time.

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The posse was onto us before we had time to change mounts. They did not give us time to eat/ we had to smoke them back while we finished changing our outfit.

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I am sure we had 10 miles start of the bunch when they left Winnemucca, and we had changed mounts several times during the night. How did they keep our trail? There they were, anyway, but with tired horses. They chased us across the pasture. We cut the wire fence and went out in the open about 300 yards ahead of them. We rode like blazes until noon. Then stopped for a lunch. Butch had just built a fire and put on the coffee pot, while I had opened a couple of cans of Three Creek meat, when the colonel who was on guard, shouted: "Here they come again! And they're coming some too!"

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One look at the posse was enough to make us bust a whole in the atmosphere again for them fellows back there were sure burning the breeze. Away we went, not in a canter. But gained on us steadily. We were nearing the southern foothills of Bruneau mountain. If we could only make timber line, we were safe. All afternoon we rode, with the posse sometimes within a quarter of a mile of us. About 5 o'clock we saw a small grove ahead. There we were nearing the timber we saw the posse spreading out and knew that to stop meant to be surrounded. So we trotted through the grove and down into a gulch, which we followed for a mile before the posse discovered that they had only surrounded our tracks. We were now in a rough country. A tired horse is no good at hill climbing, so we got off and walked, driving the horses ahead. We kept out of range of the posse till dark. It would be a hard matter to track us in daylight, and in the dark impossible.

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Since striking the hills we had been going due north toward a pass at the head of Jabridge canyon. When we were sure that we had shaken the posse we turned east and travelled as fast as the tired horses could go for three hours. There we camped. Hungry? Tired" Well, I should say we were all but dead.

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TRIALS AND TRIBULATIONS

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Thirty-six hours in the saddle riding as only a hunted man can ride, and all the while with nothing to eat. To add to our misery it began to rain. It is always cold up in that mountain at night. I would have given a hatful of that coin for a cup of hot coffee. But we dared not make a fire. We ate a lot of the old man's canned stuff, then took two hours turn on guard. The colonel went on first. When he came off and tried to wake Butch he made so much noise that I woke up and went on watch. It was a long two hours. Once I went to sleep standing up. I fell down and skinned my face. That kept me awake for the balance of my watch. I went and tried to wake Butch. I kicked him in the ribs, I pulled his hair. Not a move out of him; then I whispered in his ear: "They're coming!" It was like magic: Butch was on his feet in a flash, and I heard the .45 click as he came up. "Where at?" he asked.

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"About 15 miles west," I replied, "and you stand over there under that tree a couple of hours and let us know when they get closer."

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I then turned in for a four hour sleep with the cold drizzle still falling. How was the posse faring? Much better, for they could build a fire nod make a lot of noise cutting boughs for shelter. Their number was being constantly recruited with fresh men and horses while we still had 40 miles to go before we would get fresh mounts.

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We travelled all day up the gulch that we had camped in the night before. It led to the pass that we were trying to make. We were within two miles of the pass when the colonel, who had gone ahead to look for signs, gave us the stop signal. We went up and peeped over the ridge. We saw 25 men riding slowly toward the pass. We doubled back to our last camp and made a fire, cooked some grub, boiled coffee and had a feast.

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We went around the mountains and into Idaho by an east side pass, coming out at the head of Three creek, down in a little gulch where there was horse feed. We divided the cleanup and , as the pack horses were played out and we couldn't get to the cache in Jabridge, we concluded to bury the money there, each man to plant his own separately and not let the others know where he put it.

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Colonel put $6,500 in an empty lard pail and went down the gulch, I put my share in the war bag and went up stream, leaving Butch in camp. As I was returning after hiding the coin I saw the colonel on the top of a hill above the trail. When he joined us again he seemed to have got a hunch, for he started to tell where he had hidden this pile. "Shut up!" I said "We don't want to know where it is, Some one may lift it, then you could blame us."

RESTITUTION

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We sat down and figured up the old man's bill for groceries and hats, then doubled the amount and put it in a sack, which we left at the store as we passed that night. We had three days' peace and rode slowly to Snake river. There the chase took on so much new life that it made the first edition look like a cakewalk.

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Once we were 52 hours in the saddle. Up through Idaho and over into Wyoming we went with a posse in sight every day. We were making for a small lake in the Hole in the Wall. The colonel knew the place, Butch and I did not.

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We were trying to get grub enough to last three months, as we intended to keep under cover that long. The colonel had gone to a camp wagon by himself, while Butch and I tackled another. We had got all the grub that our horses could carry and were riding away with it when we saw a horseman riding along the opposite ridge. He was riding for first money. He sure was getting some speed out of a big bay horse. That was the last we ever saw of the colonel; it was he. He had sighted a posse.

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DEATH OF THE COLONEL

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Butch and I cut the grub adrift and hit a course to the east. The man hunters never let up. They drove us across the Red Desert into Utah, into Nevada and back into Idaho. Then we shook them and went over to Powder Springs to wait for the colonel, as he knew that we could not make our way to the lake. We remained at the Springs three weeks and were making preparations to leave one evening, when a posse came onto us unexpectedly. Both sides were taken by surprise. There was a savage fight that lasted about five minutes. We made a getaway without horses and went back and dug up the money, still not knowing that jolly, big-hearted, kind old colonel had cashed in. The posse had to him.

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The law had chased us 2,000 miles on horseback. During the trip we used up 122 horses. We had suffered hardships to the limit of human endurance. We had lost a comrade that we loved like a brother. Now if you ask, is the pay worth the work? I would say no. But it is a game that once you button onto the law won't let you break away from unless you go to jail.

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The colonel had told Butch where he had buried his money. It is there yet on the top of a hill about four miles from Three Creek, Idaho. I wouldn't go back after it if it was multiplied by ten thousand.

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."I heard that Tom Cruise and John Travolta were going to remake Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid.  Is that true?"

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Thank God it did not happen! Anyone else with such an idea, please contact Dan Buck and myself for help...

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